Radiology

Scan Times

Weblog of the Department of Radiology

Awards and Honors: July 19, 2010

Posted 9:45 AM, July 19, 2010, by jaruiz

Christie Draper, PhD, radiology postdoctoral scholar in Dr. Gold's lab; Garry Gold, MD, associate professor (diagnostic radiology); and Andrew Quon, MD, assistant professor (nuclear medicine), received the Society of Nuclear Medicine's (SNM) Correlative Imaging Council/Walter Wolf Award for their abstract, "Correlation between MRI and NaF PET/CT in Patients with Patellofemoral Knee Pain" (Draper CE, Fredericson M, Besier TF, Beaupre GS, Delp SL, Gold GE, Quon A). According to the SNM website, "[t]he Walter Wolf Award is given to the best abstract presented in a clinical or research aspect of correlative imaging. The award was named in honor of Dr. Wolf who was president of the CIC from 1999 to 2005." Dr. Draper presented their award-winning abstract at the June 2010 Annual Meeting of the Society of Nuclear Medicine (SNM).

Draper_100.gifChristie received her BS in biomedical engineering from Case Western Reserve University and her MS and PhD in mechanical engineering from Stanford University. Her dissertation work involved developing techniques to accurately measure knee joint kinematics from real-time MRI. As a postdoctoral scholar in Radiology, her research focuses on evaluating the potential of using 18F NaF PET/CT to diagnose and understand the causes of knee pain. In 2009, she was awarded the Clinical Biomechanics Award at the American Society of Biomechanics Meeting for her work evaluating differences between weight-bearing and non-weight-bearing knee joint kinematics.

Gold01B.jpg
Garry E. Gold, MD, associate professor of radiology and (by courtesy) bioengineering and orthopedics at Stanford University, received a master's degree in electrical engineering from Stanford in 1988 and his MD from Stanford in 1992. Dr. Gold has authored over 90 journal articles, 250 abstracts, and 7 patents in MRI. He has been the principal investigator or a co-investigator on over 30 funded research projects, and he is the principal investigator on two NIH-funded projects to improve MR imaging of osteoarthritis and the use of real-time MRI for the study of biomechanics. The International Skeletal Society awarded Dr. Gold the President's Medal, and this is the sixth time he was been awarded the Lauterbur Award for the best MRI paper from the Society for Computed Body Tomography and Magnetic Resonance (SCBT/MR). Dr. Gold reviews manuscripts for 10 peer-reviewed journals, including the Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (JMRI) and the Journal of Magnetic Resonance in Medicine (MRM), and he is on the editorial board of several publications. At Stanford, Dr. Gold practices clinical musculoskeletal radiology, teaching medical students, residents, and fellows. He teaches courses in imaging physics and human anatomy for medical students and graduate students, and he was awarded the Kaiser Award for outstanding and innovative contributions to education. He also serves as an advisor and co-advisor for many engineering graduate students and postdoctoral fellows.

Quon_100.gifAndrew Quon, MD, is currently an assistant professor of radiology in the Division of Nuclear Medicine as well as the chief of the PET/CT Clinical Service. Prior to coming to Stanford, Dr. Quon was a clinical staff physician at the University of California, Los Angeles, Medical Center (UCLA). He earned his BA in biology from the University of California, Berkeley, (UCB) before entering medical school at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center. After receiving his MD, Dr. Quon went on to complete his residency in nuclear medicine at the University of California, Los Angeles, Medical Center (UCLA). His research projects include investigations into the use of translational imaging agents, such as 18F-5FU, 18F-FLT, and 18F-NaF. He has published over 40 peer-reviewed articles on his research. In addition to the Walter Wolf Award, Dr. Quon's many honors include a 2007 Journal of Nuclear Medicine Scientific Paper of the Year Award as well as a 2006 AuntMinnie Scientific Paper of the Year.


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