Radiology

News

Department of Radiology

Announcements

First in the World Time-of-flight PET-MRI Scanner Arrives at Stanford

Photo of Stanford's new PET-MR scannerIn December of 2013, we received the first whole body time-of-flight PET-MRI scanner, capable of simultaneous PET and MR imaging. The PET-MR device is located at the Richard M. Lucas Center for Imaging. Stanford Radiology is a known leader in the field of advanced MRI techniques for both neurological and whole body imaging, much of which is undertaken under the auspices of the Lucas Center, led by Gary Glover, PhD. Stanford Radiology has also long been a leader in the field of molecular imaging, as evidenced by the success of the Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford (MIPS) led by Sanjiv Sam Gambhir, MD, PhD. Thus, we are the natural site to fully exploit the potential of this new PET-MRI scanner.

During the past several years, we have built a working group developing PET and MRI research projects to prepare for the use of this remarkable machine and to advise the scientists and engineers who were developing it. This group, co-led by Greg Zaharchuk, MD, PhD and Andrei Iagaru, MD, consists of radiologists, nuclear medicine physicians, and scientists focusing on all of the major applications of PET-MRI, including oncology, cardiac, musculoskeletal, and neurological applications, both for adult and pediatric patients, as well as technical development and innovation. Additionally, a clinical hyperpolarizer will soon be added to the machine, enabling hyperpolarized carbon-13 metabolomic imaging to be combined in real-time with PET-MRI. This exciting research journey will capture the specific benefits of combined PET-MRI and will allow meaningful future clinical use of this new imaging technology.

Simultaneous PET-MRI may improve clinical outcomes through improved diagnostic accuracy, therapy planning, and disease monitoring. We are excited and highly motivated by this opportunity and welcome everyone interested to contribute to its growth and success at Stanford and worldwide.

VA Radiology Service Wins an Oscar!

Payam Masabam accepts Oscar Payam Masabam and VA Radiology Service
Please join us in congratulating our VA Radiology Service for winning the Oscar! This was no doubt due their VERY hard efforts and terrific team-work.

This was the inaugural year of Stanford VA Health Care System-wide awards and the “Academy Award” style of the annual Director's Town Hall meeting. One clinical and one administrative winner were chosen by the office of the Chief of Staff and Director. The administrative winner was the payroll section.

Congratulations on your Oscar for a job VERY well done!

3155 and 3165 Porter Drive Open House

2013-grand-opening.jpgOn October 14, 2013 we celebrated the opening of our new world class facilities at 3155 and 3165 Porter Drive. The Open House included a reception, ribbon cutting by Don Listwin, Sanjiv Sam Gambhir, MD, PhD, Dean Lloyd Minor, MD and Beverley Mitchell, MD and tours of our proteomics, molecular biology, and chemistry core facilities.

View photo's of the Open House
Visit the Canary Center for Cancer Early Detection

The New "Molecular Imaging Primer" Electronic Textbook is Now Available

Molecular Imaging PrimerThe Molecular Imaging Primer is an electronic textbook by Sanjiv Sam Gambhir that introduces clinicians and researchers to the expanding field of Molecular Imaging (MI) of living subjects. Students at all levels (e.g., undergraduates, graduates, medical students, residents, post-doctoral fellows, as well as research scientists) who are entering the field, or are already in the field but needing a booster shot, should find this book useful. Where past imaging was directed at the gross physical and anatomical levels, MI is shifting imaging to the molecular and cellular levels, opening up new pathways of discovery to expand MI applications in basic science research, and clinical diagnosis and treatment. Not available in print, this eBook is exclusively available on the iPad.

  • Released for the First Time after 5 Years of Development
  • Designed Specifically for the iPad from the Ground Up
  • Written as a Textbook that Can be Used in Classes or Labs
  • Contains 492 pages with over 100 Illustrations, 55 Imaging Examples, 49 Clinical Examples, and 164 Probe Structures
  • Zoom to Full-Screen by tapping any Figure, Illustration, Movie, or Probe
  • Fully Linked References take you Directly to PubMed
  • Fully Searchable for any Word throughout the Book
  • Multiple Choice Questions with Answers that can be Checked in Real Time
  • Ability to Take your own Electronic Notes
  • A Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) Section with Answers that Should be Helpful to Individuals New to the Field
  • Dedicated Section for Industry-Related Links to Websites of Companies Involved in all Aspects of Molecular Imaging
  • Quick Navigation throughout Book via Table of Contents (TOC) and In-Text Links
  • Will Electronically Update Periodically Keeping the Book Current

REQUIREMENTS
This eBook can only be viewed on an iPad using iBooks 2 or later. iOS 5 or later is required.
Optimized for iPad 3 with retina display.

HOW TO DOWNLOAD TO YOUR IPAD
Download the free iBooks App onto your iPad. Go to Store, and search by either ISBN ('9780989541404'), or Author ('Gambhir'), or Book Title. Click 'Sample' to download free preview. Click 'Buy' to purchase (Apple ID required).

Visit iTunes for More Information

Stanford Interventional Radiology and MIPS Research Received JVIR Editor's Award for Best Manuscript of 2012

Research collaboration between the Hofmann Lab and the Gambhir Lab received the The Journal of Vascular and Interventional Radiology (JVIR) Editor's Award for Outstanding Laboratory Investigation of 2012. The paper, "Intratumoral versus intravenous gene therapy using a transcriptionally targeted viral vector in an orthotopic hepatocellular carcinoma rat model", by Kim YI, et al, undertakes an exploration of an emerging cancer treatment. "Gene therapy is an increasingly positive and exciting therapy in cancer treatment today," noted editor Ziv J Haskal, MD. "The study explored a more efficient method of targeting gene therapy in advanced liver cancer, often a difficult treatment situation because of advanced tumor stage and cirrhosis." Haskal praised the study's investigators for doing what interventional radiologists do best seeking innovative solutions within the specialty's technology.

View the announcement

View the article

Research on Imaging Therapeutic Stem Cells Received Media Coverage

Ultrasound imaging of Pre- and Post-injection of nanoparticle laden cardiac stem cells
A new paper from the Gambhir Lab by Dr. Jokerst entitled "Intracellular Aggregation of Multimodal Silica Nanoparticles for Ultrasound-Guided Stem Cell Implantation in Living Mice" has been published in Science Translational Medicine. The research details the use of nanoparticles to facilitate the initial placement of therapeutic stem cells into the host and the ability to track those cells over time. The paper has received news coverage in Stanford Medicine, Fox News, MIT Technology Review, MedCity News, Nature Medicine, and redOrbit.

Read the Science Translational Medicine paper

Read the Stanford School of Medicine article

Read the ArsTechnica article

Read the Fox News article

Read the MedCity News article

Read the MIT Technology Review article

Read the Nature Medicine article

Read the redOrbit article

Specialty Imaging: Hepatobiliary and Pancreas Textbook Now Available

Cover of Specialty Imaging: Hepatobiliary and Pancreas textbookA new book entitled, "Specialty Imaging: Hepatobiliary and Pancreas," edited by Dr's Michael P. Federle (Stanford), Brooke Jeffrey (Stanford) and Mitch Tublin (Pittsburgh) is now available. It is a comprehensive textbook dealing with disorders of the liver, bilairy tree and pancreas.

More information

Andrei Iagaru, MD Co-Chaired the 2nd Sino-American Nuclear Medicine Conference

andrei-iagaru.jpgAndrei Iagaru, MD Co-Chaired the 2nd Sino-American Nuclear Medicine Conference which was held in conjunction with the 2013 SNMMI Mid-Winter Meeting, January 23-27 in New Orleans, Louisiana. The 2nd conference welcomed more than twelve Chinese residents and CSNM leaders, and provided insightful and innovative education to attendees from around the world.

 

Stanford Radiology 2013 SNMMI Mid Winter Meeting Presenters

Meena Kumarand Dr. Erik Mittra at 2013 SNMMI Mid Winter MeetingStanford had very successful participation at the 2013 SNMMI Mid Winter Meeting. Dr. Meena Kumar, Euodia Jonathan, and Dr. Erik Mittra gave great presentations of their work.

 

Health Imaging Highlights JNM Study Where Combined Bone Scan and FDG Combo Could Improve Patient Care and Save $137M in Reimbursements

andrei-iagaru.jpgAn article in Health Imaging highlights a study from Andrei Iagaru, MD and colleagues that suggests combining bone scintigraphy using sodium fluoride-18 with 18F-FDG PET/CT could improve care for certain cancer patients and reduce healthcare costs. The study, "Combined 18F-Fluoride and 18F-FDG PET/CT Scanning for Evaluation of Malignancy: Results of an International Multicenter Trial", was published online in the Journal of Nuclear Medicine.


Read the Health Imaging article

Read the JNM abstract

2012 ARR Distinguished Investigators Award

Photo of Stanford Radiology Faculty named ARR 2012 Distinguished InvestigatorsThe Academy of Radiology Research is proud to announce Distinguished Investigators for 2012. This prestigious honor recognizes individuals for their accomplishments in the field of imaging research. Over the past few decades, the radiology research community has been responsible for many important advances that have had a profound impact on healthcare.

The Academy Induction Ceremony took place at this year’s RSNA on Monday, November 26, 2012. Dr. Stanley Baum, Chair of the Distinguished Investigator Working Group, presented the award. Congratulations to Stanford Radiology Faculty who are among those named as 2012 Distinguished Investigators!

Top (left to right):
Dan Spielman, PhD (RSL)
Jianghong Rao, PhD (MIPS)
Sylvia Plevritis, PhD (ISIS)
Sandy Napel, PhD (ISIS)
Craig Levin, PhD (MIPS)
Robert Herfkens, MD (Clinical)

Bottom (left to right):
Garry Gold, MD (Clinical, MSK)
Rebecca Fahrig, PhD (RSL)
Bruce Daniel, MD (Clinical)
Heike Daldrup-Link, MD (Clinical-Peds)
Kim Butts Pauly, PhD (RSL)
Roland Bammer, PhD (RSL)

Dr. Zeineh Awarded Epilepsy Foundation Research Grant

Photo of Michael ZeinehMichael Zeineh, MD, has received a Research Grant from the Epilepsy Foundation. The Research Grant Program stimulates epilepsy research by providing funding for investigators in the early stages of their careers.

Congtratulations, Dr. Zeineh!

Daniel Rubin Receives "Most Awesome Advisor Award"

We are very quick to critique things when they are bad, but not very good at pointing out when things are good. In the academic domain, when a mentor does a good job (meaning that he or she is resourceful, provides meaningful feedback, direction when needed, and advisees do not imagine fire emanating from the office before meetings) it often goes unspoken. The single graduate student can also lose perspective that his or her advisor is providing this duty to a huge number of students while maintaining his or her own publications, grants, and research.

This perspective was brought to the surface in the Rubin Lab, and it was apparent that many people appreciated everything that makes Daniel a really awesome advisor, but no one really talked about it. To show our appreciation, we have spontaneously presented Daniel with the "Most Awesome Advisor Award," which includes a semantically annotated version of himself with Radlex terms, each annotation encompassing a feature that makes him an awesome advisor. The plaque is signed at the bottom by his advisees, upside down like an x-ray, and we hope that he might hang it in his office as a reminder that we appreciate his hard work.

Important RSNA 2012 Events

Dr. Gambhir would like to encourage everyone to attend two important events being held at RSNA this year.

As you may have heard, RSNA will dedicate the 2012 annual meeting program to the memory of Gary M Glazer, MD. George Bisset, RSNA President, will be
making the introduction and Diane Glazer will be present to accept the
recognition on Gary's behalf. The dedication will occur during the opening
session which is Sunday, Nov 25th from 8:30 - 10:15am in the Arie Crown
Theater.

This is a tremendous honor and recognition of Gary's visionary leadership
and contributions to Radiology, so I wanted to be sure you were all aware of
the ceremony so you can plan to attend if you will be at RSNA.

Additionally, the Annual Oration in Radiation Oncology is being dedicated
to the memory of Malcolm Bagshaw, MD who passed away in September 2011.
This will be held Wednesday, November 28, at 1:30 p.m in the Arie Crown
Theater. Dr. Bagshaw was a former Chair of the Department of Radiology,
after Henry S Kaplan. In 1986, under Dr. Bagshaw, Radiology split into two
Departments: Diagnostic Radiology (which included a section of Nuclear
Medicine), and Radiation Oncology (which included Radiation Biology). Dr.
Bagshaw became the Chair of Radiation Oncology. The Annual Oration will
feature prostate cancer which was Dr. Bagshaw's major interest and for which
he was an international leader.

Finally, please save the date on your calendar for Stanford Radiology's RSNA
Alumni Reception which will be held on Tuesday evening, November 27th.
Details regarding time and location are forthcoming.

Research published in Nature Chemistry is highlighted by Nature News, Scientific American, and other media

Fluorogenic probe that can detect tuberculosis (TB) pathogen in sputum sampleThe research led by Dr. Jianghong Rao developed a highly sensitive and specific fluorogenic probe that can detect tuberculosis (TB) pathogen in sputum sample, providing a promising tool for rapid and convenient TB diagnosis at home.

Read the Nature Chemistry article

Read the Nature News article

Read the Scientific American article

Read the SCOPE article

Save the Date - Zeego@Stanford Opening Ceremonies
Oct. 12, 2012

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The Fahrig Lab and the Department of Radiology at Stanford University would like to invite you to a symposium and open lab in celebration of the opening of the new Zeego@ Stanford Lab on Friday, October 12th, 2012.

Beginning with:
A symposium on new C-arm imaging technology from 1:30pm to 4:00pm.

1:30pm C-Arm Technology: Past, Present and Future - Rebecca Fahrig, PhD, Stanford

1.55pm Keynote Speaker: The Angiographic Suite as the Stroke Unit of the Future - Charles Strother, MD, University of Wisconsin, Madison

2:25pm Questions/Answers
2:30pm Coffee Break
2:45pm C-arm CT and the Liver: 3D and Perfusion Imaging - Nishita Kothary, MD, Stanford
3:10pm The Role of 3D imaging in EP Cardiac Procedures - Amin Al-Ahmad, MD, Stanford
3:35pm The Future is F3: Functional Imaging, Faster Rotation, Fast Detector - Klaus Kingenbeck, PhD, Siemens
4:00pm End

Location:
Alway Building, Room M114
Stanford University
300 Pasteur Drive
Stanford, CA 94305

The Zeego@Stanford Open Lab from 3:00pm to 5:00pm.

3:00pm Demonstrations of the new Zeego in Grant S088
5:00pm Open Lab End

Location:
Grant Building, Room S088
Stanford University
300 Pasteur Drive
Stanford, CA 94305

Zeego@Stanford is an NIH Shared Instrument Facility

Remembering Dr. Henry H Jones (1917-2012)

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Dr. Henry Jones, with more than 50 years of service to Stanford Radiology (1948–2006), died peacefully at home, Saturday, August 11, 2012 with his wife Peggy and family nearby. Dr. Jones has left an enduring legacy for the Department and for the discipline of Radiology; his contributions, along with his wit and wonderful sense of humor, will be long remembered by his colleagues, friends, and students. Henry H Jones, MDPlease see Dr. Jones' "Lifetime Achievement Award" to learn more about his long career. You can also read his first-author paper "A History of the Department of Radiology at Stanford University" published in the American Journal of Roentgenology 1995 Mar;164(3):753-60, to read more about the history of our Department and Dr. Jones' role in helping to shape one of the most advanced, successful radiology departments nationwide.

A memorial service for Dr. Jones will be held at Stanford Memorial Church on Thursday, September 20, 2012 at 4:00 PM. A reception will follow at Paul Brest Hall/Rehnquist Courtyard at approximately 5:30pm.

2012 Department of Radiology Angel Funding Recipients

The Department of Radiology, the Angel Funding Review committee, and Dr. Sam Gambhir are pleased to announce this year’s winners of angel funding to advance their research and eventually apply for longer term funding. The novel projects funded include new partnerships within the Department, high risk projects, and first-in-man studies. Congratulations to all – wish you great success in your work and with your newly established collaborations.

– Angel Funding Committee and Sam Gambhir

biswal.jpgmoseley.jpgSandip Biswal, MD; Michael Moseley, PhD
Co-Investigators: Matthew Smuck, MD; Deqiang Qiu, PhD; Deepak Behera, DNB
Focused magnetic nanoparticle theragnostics for chronic pain



ghanouni.jpgsegall.jpghongYu.pnghovsepian.jpgPejman Ghanouni, MD, PhD; George Segall, MD; Hong Yu, MD; David Hovsepian, MD
A feasibility study to evaluate the safety and initial effectiveness of MR-guided focused ultrasound surgery in the treatment of facetogenic lumbar back pain


Iagaru.jpgAndrei Iagaru, MD
Co-Investigators: Arutselvan Natarajan, PhD; Erik Mittra, MD, PhD; Ranjana Advani, MD
Assessing response to treatment in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma patients using 64Cu-DOTA-Rituximab PET/CT


kothary.jpgNishita Kothary, MD
Co-Investigators: Sandy Napel, PhD; Sylvia Plevritis, PhD; Aya Kamaya, MD; Parag Mallick, PhD
Development of predictive models of vascular invasion in hepatocellular carcinoma


pitteri.jpglipson.jpgSharon Pitteri, PhD; Jafi Lipson, MD
A pilot study of correlative imaging, leukocyte telomere length, and circulating telomerase levels of patients with benign and malignant breast lesions


quon.pngwu.jpgAndrew Quon, MD; Joseph Wu, MD, PhD
Co-Investigators: Andrei Iagaru, MD; Patricia Nguyen, MD
Indium-111 labeled stem cell imaging for monitoring myocardial stem cell therapy


willmann.pngkamaya.jpgJuergen Willmann, MD; Aya Kamaya, MD
Co-Investigators: George A. Fischer, MD, PhD; Dimitre Hristov, PhD; Lu Tian, PhD
Early detection of treatment response in patients with colorectal cancer liver metastases using volumetric perfusion ultrasound imaging

Congratulations to Drs. Biswal, Moseley, Ghanouni, Segall, Yu, Hovsepian, Iagaru, Kothary, Pitteri, Lipson, Quon, Wu, Kamaya, and Willmann and to each of their Co-Investigators!

Stanford Radiology 3T MRI Grand Opening in Main Hospital

On July 9th, the Stanford Department of Radiology had an open house in the main hospital celebrating the opening of the MR3 Imaging Area and the addition of the new Discovery MR750w 3.0T MRI scanner with a ribbon cutting and cake ceremony.

3T_MRI_ribbon.jpg Pictured left to right: Teresa Nelson (MRI Supervisor); Sanjiv Sam Gambhir MD, PhD (Radiology Chairman); Robert Herfkens, MD (Director of MRI); Jerry Maki (VP Clinical Services); Joni Schott - (Radiology Administrative Director)


3T_MRI_cake2.jpg Pictured left to right: Sanjiv Sam Gambhir MD, PhD (Radiology Chairman); Jerry Maki (VP Clinical Services); Joni Schott - (Radiology Administrative Director); Robert Herfkens, MD (Director of MRI)


3T_MRI_cake1.jpg

Abstract on Combined NaF/FDG PET and CT Imaging Received Media Attention

The abstract "Evaluation of NaF PET/CT, FDG PET/CT, combined NaF/FDG PET/CT and CT alone for detection of bone metastases" (lead investigator: A. Iagaru) presented at the Society of Nuclear Medicine's 2012 Annual Meeting has been featured by several media outlets, including the National Cancer Institute.

The paper describes that a combination of dual imaging probes molecular imaging and anatomic imaging detects more cancerous lesions than individual scans.

Read abstract

Read National Cancer Institute article

Read Health Imaging News article

Read Orthopedics This Week article

Read My Cancer Blogs article

Dr. Goris Retired July 1, 2012

Michael Goris, MD, PhD, Professor of Radiology - Nuclear Medicine,
retired on Jul 1, 2012 after 39 years of exceptional service and
contributions to Nuclear Medicine and Stanford University. We wish him
a long and happy retirement.

Thank you, Dr. Goris!

Photos at the technologist's dinner for Dr. Goris's retirement:

IMG_1240.JPGDrs. Andy Quon, Andre Iagaru, Michael Goris, Sam Gambhir, and Erik Mittra

IMG_1239.JPGCelebrating Dr. Goris's Retirement

Goris (retirement) 3.jpg

Goris (retirement) 2.jpg


Remembering Dr. James F. Silverman (1932-2012), former Clinical Chief of Diagnostic Radiology

James F Silverman, MDJames F. Silverman was born and raised in Western Pennsylvania. He received a B.Sc. in Pharmacy (Univ. of Pittsburgh ’53). Following a tour in the US Army (1953-1955), Jim worked as a pharmacist in his father’s drug store before entering medical school at Hahnemann (MD ‘61), where he met and married a student nurse, his lifelong love, Barbara Stask. After an internship (Mt Sinai Hospital, NYC) and a first year residency in Internal Medicine (Philadelphia General Hospital), he established a general medical practice for four years in Newtown, CT. In 1967 he entered residency in Diagnostic Radiology at the Hospital of St. Raphael, New Haven, CT.

We first met Jim when he came to Stanford in 1969 to begin a two-year Fellowship in Cardiovascular Radiology, following which he accepted a junior faculty position. From the outset, it was clear that Jim was a skilled clinical radiologist and a natural teacher. The residents, fellows and attending staff valued his angiographic and interpretive skills and his commitment to responsive and prompt patient care. His academic interests resulted in 44 manuscripts, mainly in the fields of cardiac radiology and health policy research. To assist angiographers, primarily cardiologists, he published a book, “Coronary Angiography: An Introduction to Interpretation and Technique,” that included a tear-out 3-D model of the heart. His academic career flourished, and he was promoted to full Professor in 1984.

Jim’s interests in improving the quality of patient care led to his appointment as Clinical Chief of Diagnostic Radiology in 1974. He was the first physician to earn a Master's in Business Management (MS ‘77) from the prestigious Sloan Program at the Stanford Graduate School of Business. From 1979 to 1986 he served as Chief of Staff of Stanford University Hospital, converting a previously ceremonial post into an active management position. Jim instituted policies to expedite quality patient care by crafting strong working relationships between hospital administrators, physicians, hospital personnel and the Dean. His strong personality and affable demeanor led to many successful negotiations, despite the often contentious political challenges. During this period he also served as Associate Dean for Clinical Affairs, Stanford University School of Medicine.

In 1989, Jim and Barb returned to their roots in Western Pennsylvania where Jim accepted the position as Director, Medical Imaging Department, Jameson Memorial Hospital, New Castle, PA. After ten years, the Silvermans returned to California, purchasing a ranch near Chico. In retirement, Jim practiced part-time with the North State Radiology group until his untimely death.

Jim loved the outdoors; camping and hiking with family and friends, skiing, tennis, running and golf. He was our good friend and colleague for over 40 years; loyal, selfless, compassionate and great company. His devotion to his family was uncompromising and a source of constant joy to him. His wife and best friend of 50 years, Barbara, his daughter Susie and son Ben, their spouses and three grandchildren survive him.

Dr. Scott Atlas appointed Senior Fellow in Health Care Policy at the Hoover Institute

SWA_0033.jpgDr. Scott Atlas has left the Stanford Department of Radiology to accept a fulltime faculty appointment as Senior Fellow in Health Care Policy at Stanford University's Hoover Institution. Please read more about Dr. Atlas’ new role…


Congratulations Dr. Atlas! Wishing you the best!

 

Kim Butts Pauly gives plenary lecture at ISMRM

Kim Butts Pauly, PhD gave a plenary lecture at the 2012 ISMRM meeting in Melbourne. Her talk, MR-Guided Focused Ultrasound, was given in conjunction with the Friday May 11 Plenary Hall series, Emerging Medical Procedures & Devices with MRI.

ISMRM Junior Fellow Awards

ismrm_fellowsblog.jpg
Stanford University Radiological Sciences Laboratory announces two ISMRM
fellows who share the limelight at this year's 2012 ISMRM in Melbourne,
Australia: Priti Balchandani, PhD and Deqiang Qiu, PhD.

Congratulations!

Triple-modality MRI-photoacoustic-Raman (MPR) Nanoparticle Received Media Attention After Being Published in Nature Medicine

Triple modality nanoparticle helps delineate brain tumor boundriesStanford Radiology research published in the journal Nature Medicine showed that engineered nanoparticles homed in on and hightlighted brain tumors, precisely delineating their boundries and greatly easing their complete removal.

Stanford press release | Nature Medicine article

Read DailyTech article

Read Nanotechnology Now article

Read ScienceDaily article

Read Scotsman article

Read Stanford Daily article

Read TopNews Arab Emerates article

Research by Andrew Holbrook Receives Media Coverage

andrew-holbrook-webOS.jpgAndrew B. Holbrook, PhD, a research associate in the Radiologic Sciences Lab, has developed applications using the open-source webOS (Palm) to operate on a modified mobile phone and a HP TouchPad tablet allowing users to control an MRI scanner.

Read the full stories below

San Jose Mercury News - (2/18/2012)

Endgadget - (12/8/2011)

A Celebration to Honor Professor Norbert Pelc

Pelc_Group_0583.jpg Please join us for a celebration to honor Prof. Norbert J. Pelc's induction into the National Academy of Engineering, for "Development of algorithms and technologies for MRI, CT, and hybrid X-ray/MRI imaging." Norbert's contributions to the field and Stanford University have been remarkable. This recognition of his achievements is well deserved and we are all very proud his career success and the distinction that he has brought to himself and Stanford Radiology.

Come toast Norbert on this great accomplishment:

Date: Friday, February 17th
Time: 11:30am
Location: Lucas Center Expansion Light Court (1201 Welch Road)

From the NAE 2/9 press release: Election to the NAE is one of the highest professional distinctions that can be accorded an engineer. Academy membership honors those who have made outstanding contributions to "engineering research, practice, or education, including, where appropriate, significant contributions to the engineering literature," and to the "pioneering of new and developing fields of technology, making major advancements in traditional fields of engineering, or developing/implementing innovative approaches to engineering education."

Reseach Featured on the Cover of Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology

atvb_32-1.gifWork from Dr. Joseph Wu's Cardiovascular Gene and Cell Therapy Lab entitled "In vivo functional and transcriptional profiling of bone marrow stem cells after transplantation into ischemic myocardium" was featured on the cover of Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology.

[ read article | view cover ]

Reseach Featured on the Cover of the Journal Science Translational Medicine & Receives Media Coverage

Science Translational Medicine coverResearch from the Multimodality Molecular Imaging Laboratory (MMIL) entitled "Mathematical Model Identifies Blood Biomarker-Based Early Cancer Detection Strategies and Limitations" was featured on the cover of the journal Science Translational Medicine. Sharon Hori and Sanjiv Sam Gambhir developed a mathematical model relating blood biomarker levels to tumor growth, and computationally showed that current clinical biomarker assays are likely incapable of detecting a tumor smaller than an olive, where in some cases the tumor may have been present for at least 10 years. The mathematical model developed here can be applied to virtually any solid cancer and associated biomarkers shed to help identify better candidate biomarkers and other strategies for early cancer detection.

Congratulations, Sharon and Dr. Gambhir!

[ read article | view cover ]

Stanford School of Medicine article

ConsumerAffairs.com article

GenomeWeb article

Stage 4 Cancer article

"Stem Cell Labeling For Delivery and Tracking Using Noninvasive Imaging" is Now Available

Cover of Stem Cell Labeling For Delivery and Tracking Using Noninvasive ImagingA new book entitled "Stem Cell Labeling For Delivery and Tracking Using Noninvasive Imaging" edited by Dr. Dara Kraitchman (Johns Hopkins University) and Dr. Joseph Wu, (Stanford) is now available.

CRC Press

Clinically-Relevant Regulatory Networks in the Lung Tumor Microenvironment (1U01CA154969-01A1)

Dr. Sylvia Plevritis and a multidisciplinary team of Stanford investigators were recently awarded a U01 grant to reconstruct the first Tumor Microenvironment Interactome (TMI) of human lung adenocarcinoma, which will identify regulatory interactions between human malignant cells and their associated infiltrating immune cells, endothelial cells and fibroblasts. This work promises to reveal novel therapeutic targets, as well as potential combinations of existing therapeutics, that could lead to more effective treatment of human lung adenocarcinoma. This project, on its own presents a novel pathway to understanding cell-cell interactions and therapeutic targets, but also builds an important link to the Napel/Plevritis R01 (Tools for Linking and Mining Image and Genomic Data in NSCL cancer) by allowing for entirely new image-pathology associations with the tumor microenvironment.

Tools for Linking and Mining Image and Genomic Data in Non-small Cell Lung Cancer (1R01CA160251-01)

Dr. Sandy Napel and Dr. Sylvia Plevritis were recently awarded an R01 grant that seeks to link CT and PET images of lung cancer to microarray analyses of excised tumors. To do this we will develop tools and technologies that characterize these images with quantitative image features, and that explore relationships between these image features, genomic information from the microarrays, and other clinical data including survival. We are concentrating on a single disease, non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC), the leading cause of cancer death with an overall 5-year survival rate of 16% that has not changed appreciably over the past 15 years. However these tools are applicable to a wide range of imaging and disease scenarios, and have the potential to reduce the need for biopsies as well as to improve the specificity of disease diagnosis, a step in the direction of image-guided personalized medicine.

Announcements: ISIS June Seminar Series

ISISjune seminar2011.jpg
For more information, please contact Danae Barnes, administrative program manager.

Announcements: Rad Staff Retreat, Thursday, June 30, 2011

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Our 2011 Radiology Staff Retreat has been moved to Thursday, June 30th. The day will start with a continental breakfast at the Frances C. Arriaga Alumni Center and will include a focus on professional development as well as a barbeque with Joe and TJ at the grill in the Chuck Taylor Grove (near Arriaga), located behind the Avery Aquatic Center next to the running track.

ChuckTaylorGrove_350.jpg


You won't want to miss it! Our last retreat was in 2007!

If you have any questions, please contact one of the staff retreat committee members: Roni, Lourdes, Joe, TJ, Alice, and Teresa.

Announcements: ISIS May Seminar Series

ISISseminarseriesMay_350.jpg
For more information, please contact Danae Barnes, administrative program manager.

Announcements: Cardinal Walk on Friday, May 13th

Come walk 1.25 miles around our campus with your Stanford colleagues on Friday, May 13th!

The 5th Annual Cardinal Walk will begin at Roble Field at 12:10 PM. Provost John Etchemendy will be leading the walk. Last year, more than 1,200 Stanford members participated in the walk. There will also be a Spirit Contest, and trophies will given to the most spirited small, medium, and large groups!

Sponsored by BeWell, the walk is a free event. For more information, please access the BeWell website at http://bewell.stanford.edu/cardinal-walk-2011.

Announcements: Cancer Systems Biology Annual Symposium "Systems Biology of Cancer" May 2 and 3

CCSB Annual Symposium_350.jpg

Please download the agenda here: Stanford CCSB Annual Symposium Agenda.pdf.

Event Parking: Galvez Field Parking Lot. Breakfast and lunch will be provided.
Questions? Please contact Anita Samantaray, MPH, CCSB Program Manager, at 650.725.6070.

April Speed Dating Presentations: Finding Your Research Collaborator

"Speed Dating" presentations by our faculty are designed to be brief, 4-minute snapshots of a single research focus to help broaden awareness of departmental work and to stimulate new collaborations.

At the Wednesday, April 13th, noon research conference, the following faculty presented their research (please contact them if you have any questions):


Dr. Michael Moseley: "'New School' MRI: Susceptibility"

Dr. Daniel Spielman: "Imaging Metabolism Using Hyperpolarized 13C MRS"

Dr. Shreyas Vasanawala: "Body MRI"


Announcements: Stanford Center for Cancer Systems Biology (CCSB) April Seminar Series

CCSB April Seminar Series (2).jpg

For more information, please contact Anita Samantaray, MPH, CCSB Program Manager, at 650.725.6070.

Announcements: CBIS Seminar "X-Ray Visible Stem Cells for Enhanced Delivery and Engraftment in Cardiovascular Disease"

When: April 6, 2011 from 2:30-3:30pm
Where: Li Ka Shing Center, Room 120
What: Dr. Dara Kraitchman will present "X-Ray Visible Stem Cells for Enhanced Delivery and Engraftment in Cardiovascular Disease" presented by

Research Interests
Dr. Kraitchman's research interests are concentrated on non-invasive imaging and minimally invasive treatment of cardiovascular disease. She has been actively involved in developing new methods to image myocardial function and perfusion using MRI. Her current research interests focus on determining the optimal timing and method of administration of mesenchymal stem cells to regenerate infarcted myocardium using non-invasive MR fluoroscopic delivery and imaging. MRI and radiolabeling techniques include novel MR and radiotracer stem cell labeling methods to determine the location, quantity, and biodistribution of stem cells after delivery as well as to noninvasively determine the efficacy of these therapies in acute myocardial infarction and peripheral arterial disease.

Dara L. Kraitchman, VMD, PhD, FACC, is from the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, where she is also a member of the Department of Molecular and Comparative Pathobiology Institute for NanoBioTechnology and the Institute for Computation Medicine.

Abstract
Despite rapid translation of stem cell therapies into clinical practice, the treatment for cardiovascular disease with stem and progenitor cells has not yet yielded satisfactory results. Non-invasive imaging techniques could provide greater insight into not only the therapeutic benefit, but also the fundamental mechanisms that underlie stem cell fate, migration, survival and engraftment in vivo. Over the last several decades, microencapsulation methods have been developed for immunoprotection of cellular therapies. Recently, our group has developed a novel family of “imaging visible” microencapsulation techniques to enhance stem cell survival, prevent immunorejection of allogeneic stem cells, and enable tracking with MRI, X-ray, and ultrasonic imaging. Examples of the first X-ray visible delivery and tracking techniques for use in cardiovascular disease will be discussed.

For more information, please contact Teresa Newton, administrative associate.

Announcements: Earth Day 2011

Connecting the Dots: The Food, Energy, Water, and Climate Nexus

WHEN: Friday, April, 22, 2011
1:00 pm to 6:30 pm

Where: Bishop Auditorium
518 Memorial Way
Stanford University

Faculty participants from Stanford will include:
•Stacey Bent (TomKat Center for Sustainable Energy, Precourt Institute for Energy) Welcome

•Roz Naylor (Program on Food Security and the Environment, Environmental Earth
System Science, Woods Institute for the Environment) The Global Food Challenge

•Chris Field (Carnegie Institution Department of Global Ecology) The Food-Energy Nexus

•David Lobell (Program on Food Security and the Environment, Environmental Earth System Science, Woods Institute for the Environment) The Food-Climate Nexus

•Buzz Thompson (Stanford Law School, Woods Institute for the Environment) The Food-Water Nexus

•Mariano-Florentino Cuellar (Center for International Security and Cooperation, Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies) The Food-Security Nexus

•Dean Pamela Matson (School of Earth Sciences) The Way Forward, panel moderated by Dean Matson

Breakout session topics will include the carbon footprint of food; aquaculture; ecosytem services; and sustainable meat.

Registration is required with priority given to Stanford students, faculty, and staff, and to others in the Stanford community. Please register at: http://www.regonline.com/Register/Checkin.aspx?EventID=950047. For more information, please access: http://connectingthedots.stanford.edu/.

Announcements: 2011 Robert Hofstadter Memorial Lectures

On Monday, April 4th, and Tuesday, April 5th, the Department of Physics at Stanford University is sponsoring two 2011 Robert Hofstadter Memorial Lectures by theoretical physicist Professor N. David Mermin, Horace White Professor of Physics (Emeritus) at Cornell University.

1) “Spooky Actions at a Distance”
When: Monday, April 4, 2011, 8:00 PM; evening public lecture
Where: Hewlett Teaching Center, 370 Serra Mall, Rm. 200

2) “What Has Quantum Mechanics to Do with Factoring?”
When: Tuesday, April 5, 2011, 4:15 PM ; afternoon colloquium
Where: Hewlett Teaching Center, 370 Serra Mall, Rm. 201

For more information, please download this flyer 2011RobertHofstadterMemorialLectures.pdf, or visit the Stanford Physics Dept. website at http://www.stanford.edu/dept/physics/events/2011/hofstadter.html .

Announcements: ISIS April Seminar Series

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For more information, please contact Danae Barnes, administrative program manager.

Announcements: 2011 Center for Biomedical Imaging at Stanford (CBIS) Symposium on March 29

The 2011 CBIS Symposium, "Pushing the Limits of Imaging: Faster, Higher Stronger," will take place from 8:30 AM to 4:30 PM on March 29th at the Li Ka Shing Center on the 2nd floor. Dr. Rod Pettigrew, director of the NIH NIBIB, will be the keynote speaker. Please access the complete information for the symposium at http://cbis.stanford.edu/symposium/program.html.

Announcements: RIGS Match Event, April 4th at 7 PM

The Radiology Interest Group (RIGS) at Stanford has organized a panel of clinical medical students who have matched this year in various radiology residency programs. Students interested in applying to a radiology residency program are invited to come ask questions about the application and interview process as well as to hear the panelists share their strategies.

The event will be held on April 4th at 7 PM in the Lucas Center Conference Room (P083); dinner will be provided. Please RSVP (RIGS.Match.Event@gmail.com). To find out more information, please access the RIGS website at http://rigs.stanford.edu/.

Announcements: Stanford Center for Cancer Systems Biology (CCSB) March Seminar Series

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For more information, please contact Anita Samantaray, MPH, CCSB Program Manager, at 650.725.6070.

Announcements: ISIS March Seminar Series

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For more information, please contact Danae Barnes, administrative program manager.

Announcements: ISIS February Seminar Series

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For more information, please contact Danae Barnes, administrative program manager.

Announcements: Stanford Center for Cancer Systems Biology (CCSB) Annual Symposium "Systems Biology of Cancer"


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Event Parking: Galvez Field Parking Lot. Breakfast and lunch will be provided.
Questions? Please contact Anita Samantaray, MPH, CCSB Program Manager, at 650.725.6070.

Announcements: ISIS January Seminar Series

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For more information, please contact Danae Barnes, administrative program manager.

Announcements: Stanford Center for Cancer Systems Biology January Seminar Series


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For more information, please contact Anita Samantaray, MPH, CCSB Program Manager, at 650.725.6070.

Announcements: Stanford Center for Cancer Systems Biology November Seminar Series

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For more information, please contact Anita Samantaray, MPH, CCSB Program Manager, at 650.725.6070.

Announcements II: September 16, 2010

Medical Device Innovation: On September 27th at 5 PM in McCaw Hall at the Arrillaga Alumni Center, Jeffrey Shuren, MD, JD, director of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA)'s Center for Devices and Radiological Health, will be speaking about how the federal government can help private industry foster the development of lifesaving medical devices. Dr. Shuren will be discussing this issue with the following panelists: John Capek, PhD, executive vice president of medical devices at Abbott; Ross Jaffe, MD, managing director of Versant Ventures; Josh Makower, founder and CEO of Exploramed; and Stefanos Zenios, PhD, professor at Stanford’s Graduate School of Business.

To read more, please access "Media Advisory: Top FDA Official to Discuss Medical Device Innovation with Industry Leaders at Stanford."

Announcements I: September 16, 2010

Free Flu Shots: Stanford will be offering free flu shots for faculty, staff, students, and retirees beginning Oct. 6th. For a flu clinic schedule, please access http://flu.stanford.edu/.

Announcements: September 13, 2010

Stanford Staffers Social Mixer: Thursday, September 16th, from 5:30 to 7:00 PM at Bangkok Bay Restaurant, Redwood City.

Date: Thursday, September 16
Time: 5:30 - 7:00

Place: Bangkok Bay Restaurant
825 El Camino, Redwood City

RSVP: Elizabeth Lasensky: lasensky@stanford.edu
by September 14

Announcements: July 15, 2010

The Clayman Institute is featuring the photography of Heike Liss in an exhibit called
“Home is When I Belong.” The Liss exhibit will run Monday through Friday (10 AM to 5 PM) from June 28th until Octboer 15, 2010 at the Clayman Institute, which is located at the Serra House at 589 Capistrano Way on the Stanford campus.

The "Event Detail" page from the Clayman Institute includes the following description: "'Home is When I Belong' is an exhibition that brings together photographs from two series of works by Heike Liss, a German born artist who spends her time living, working, and traveling in California and Europe with her husband and children. The first series, 'home/away' (since 2002), contains photographs taken in hotel rooms during the artist’s travels. Liss says: 'I think of these images as portraits that speak of a sense of a lack of belonging: in a place, in a time, in the world.' The second series of photographs in Home is When I Belong is the artist’s more formal 'Family Portraits' (since 2003). Here Liss photographs people in their homes in and around Oakland, eloquently capturing the diverse range of family structures existent today. Across both series, Liss investigates how we define ourselves in relation to the fundamentally human concepts of 'home' and 'family.' Her photographs reveal some of the universal aspects of life experience and identity within varied socio-cultural situations.

For more information, please click here.

Announcements: July 12, 2010

First-Come, First-Served Stanford Staffers Ice Cream Social!
July 14th (Wednesday)
12:10-1:00 PM
In front of the Old Union

There will be prizes: $5.00 gift cards to a local ice creamery! For more information, please contact Sunny Toy at toy@stanford.edu.

Stanford Radiology Informatics Update

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Attention all Radiology Centricity RIS, Centricity PACS, RadWhere, Dictaphone Users

Beginning June 18th, Stanford Radiology Informatics is updating their on-call support contact information for the following applications: Radiology Centricity RIS, Centricity PACS, RadWhere, and dictaphone.

There is now one pager, one email, and one phone extension to address all radiology application issues. For this new contact information, please download this flyer Radiology_Informatics_New_Contact_Info.pdf to display in your area or save as a reference.

This information is also available on the radiology portal.

Note: Please continue to contact the IT Help Desk 3-3333 and/or vendor when appropriate.

Announcements: The Annotation of Images in a Semantic Web--The Challenges Ahead

On Wednesday, May 12th, from 11:00 AM to Noon, M. Scott Marshall, PhD, assistant professor of bioinformatics, will be presenting a talk entitled "The Annotation of Images in a Semantic Web--The Challenges Ahead," sponsored by ISIS (Information Sciences in Imaging at Stanford). Dr. Marshall is a faculty member in the Department of Medical Statistics and Bioinformatics at Leiden University Medical. He is also the project manager of Adaptive Information Disclosure in the Informatics Institute at the University of Amsterdam. He will be giving his talk in the Lucas Learning Center (P-083).

For more information regarding his talk, please see his abstract below or contact Danae Barnes, program manager of ISIS.

Abstract:
As steadily more structured vocabularies and ontologies are made available on the Web, attention is turning toward how to share and annotate data using these vocabularies. A new era of collaborative research is becoming possible, enabled by steadily increasing numbers of inter-linked resources. In order for these resources to add value to each other through "linking," a sustainable and common system of shared identifiers, vocabularies, and data provenance practice is required.

Announcements: The Social Neuroscience of Prosociality--From Empathy to Compassion

On May 18th at 5:30 PM-7:00 PM, Dr. Tania Singer will be giving a talk entitled "The Social Neuroscience of Prosociality: From Empathy to Compassion" in Building 320, Room 105. This talk is sponsored by the Center for Compassion and Altruism Research and Education in the Stanford School of Medicine.

Dr. Singer holds the inaugural chair of Social Neuroscience and Neuroeconomics at the University of Zurich, and is also the director of the Department of Social Neuroscience at the Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences in Leipzig, Germany. Her research centers on human social behavior and uses an interdisciplinary approach combining theories, paradigms, and techniques from a variety of disciplines including neuroscience; developmental and social psychology; and economics. No admission fee is required.

For directions to the conference location, please access: http://campus-map.stanford.edu/index.cfm?ID=01-320. If you have questions, please contact Thi V.A. Thach.

Dr. Geoff Rubin Presents "Inside Out" Through Stanford Mini Med School

As a lecturer in the winter quarter Stanford Mini Med School, Geoff Rubin, MD, provided an introduction to various imaging modalities in his presentation, "Inside Out: How Imaging Technology Offers a Portal to Human Anatomy and Disease," which is now available as an online video at http://med.stanford.edu/minimed/winter/. The lectures offered through the Stanford Mini Med School during the winter quarter were part of their "Medicine, Human Health and the Frontiers of Science" series.


Announcements: The History of Lasers at Stanford

The Stanford Historical Society is holding its 34th Annual Meeting & Reception on Tuesday, May 25th, from 4:15 – 6:45 PM at Cubberley Auditorium (485 Lasuen Mall, Stanford University). Professor Robert L. Byer, the William R. Kenan, Jr. Professor of Applied Physics, will be presenting a special guest presentation on "The History of Lasers at Stanford." A reception will follow. Please RSVP (YES only) by Friday, May 14, 2010, to stanfordhist@stanford.edu or 650-725-3332.

For a description of the talk, please download Annual meeting-May 25 2010.pdf.

Announcements: Dr. Hovsepian to Lecture on Women's Health May 19th

On May 19th from 6:30 PM to 8:00 PM, David Hovsepian, MD, professor of radiology as well as chief quality and safety officer, will deliver a lecture on Uterine Fibroids as part of Stanford Hospital & Clinic's free Women’s Community Education Program. Attendees will learn about the treatment options available to women who suffer from uterine fibroids and will meet one of the Hospital's patients. Dr. Hovsepian's lecture will be held on campus in the Alway Class Room M106 (at 300 Pasteur Drive). Please register for the talk, as seating is limited, by calling 650.498.6022. For more information, please download our flyer UterineFibroids.pdf.

Research Associateship Programs

The National Research Council (NRC) of the National Academies is sponsoring awards for graduate, postdoctoral, and senior researchers at federal laboratories and affiliated institutions.

For more information about how to apply online and a list of participating laboratories, please access the NRC Research Associateship Programs web site at:
www.national-academies.org/rap.

Announcements: March 18, 2010

"The Death and Life of the Great American School System: How Testing and Choice Are Undermining Education," presented by Diane Ravitch research professor of education, New York University: Wednesday, April 14, 2010, from 5:30 PM to 6:30 PM in Cubberley Auditorium, School of Education at 485 Lasuen Mall with a reception to follow. Dr. Ravitch will be discussing the privatization of American public education as part of the Stanford University School of Education Cubberley Lecture Series. For more informaton, please access http://www.facebook.com/event.php?eid=269748848837&index=1 or contact Linda Darling-Hammond.


Speech Recognition Coming Soon to Stanford Medicine Imaging Center

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By Yvonne Casillas, Business Systems Analyst

RadWhere Speech Recognition from Nuance
By the end of this month, speech recognition will begin its launch at Stanford Medicine Imaging Center.

The speech recognition project team at Stanford has been working hard over the last four months to understand the applications capabilities; to integrate with other systems; to build report templates, and to develop new dictation workflows.

Dr. Herfkens, the initiative sponsor for the project, meets regularly with the project team to provide input and define goals.

Each section has a champion assigned, such as body fellow John Chang, MD, and mammography fellow Jafi Lipson, MD, who is diligently working on the creation of report templates, which will be available for future use. Within a matter of time, the new dictation process will become a more streamlined and efficient workflow.

Phase Roll-Out Plan
The roll-out is scheduled to occur in six phases.

Phase I begins March 23, 2010, for body and neuro MR/CT at Stanford Medicine Calendar.pngImaging Center. The remaining radiology sections will launch over the next several months to be completed by June 21st. The Training for Phase I is scheduled from March 15th through March 19th.

Are you scheduled to work at Stanford Medicine Imaging Center between March 23rd-April 2nd? If so, please contact please contact Yvonne Casillas, business systems analyst, to schedule your training! We want everyone to be well prepared. Similarly, all other rollouts will have training set up one week prior to going live with the application.

Research Opportunity Database

The Stanford Medical Student Association recently launched a database that allows Stanford Medical School faculty to post a description of their research opportunities for interested medical students. For more information, please access the Research Project Database at https://www.stanford.edu/group/smsa/cgi-bin/view_research.php.

Announcements: July 23, 2009

Stanford Summer Theater (SST) Electra Festival: July 23rd-August 15th at Memorial Auditorium. Stanford Summer Theater (SST) presents the Electra Festival, which explores one of the great mythic heroines through theater and film. The Festival begins on July 23rd and ends on August 15th and runs Thursdays through Saturdays at 8:00 PM with a Sunday matinee on August 9th at 2:00 PM. All events are at the Memorial Auditorium, Stanford University. For tickets and other information, please click here, call 650-725-5838, or stanfordsummertheater@gmail.com.

Announcements: May 28, 2009

Third Annual Cardinal Walk: Friday, May 29, 2009, from 11:30 AM to 1 PM at Roble Field on Santa Teresa Street.

Event Schedule
11:30--Free t-shirts for first 1,500 walkers and free music and refreshments (No registration required!).

11:35--Spirit Contestants must check-in.

11:45--Spirit Contest judging on creativity and enthusiasm (trophies awarded)

12:05--Provost Welcome

12:10 to 1 PM--Campus Walk

For more information, please access http://stanford.wellsphere.com/3rd-annual-cardinal-walk-community/249295.

Announcements: May 20, 2009

Stanford Blood Center's Grateful Life Tour, May 22nd, 23rd, 26th, 27th, 28th, 29th, and 30th; June 26th, 27th, 29th, and 30th; and July 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, and 6th at all Stanford Blood Center locations: For the fifth consecutive year, the Stanford Blood Center is sponsoring the "Grateful Life Tour" blood drive ("Grateful Life Tour V") in which blood donors will get to choose either the traditional tie dye t-shirt with the "Giving is Groovy Grateful Life Tour V" design or a brand new design featuring "recylce life. give blood" on a 100% organic cotton t-shirt. The Grateful Life Tour will take place on May 22nd, 23rd, 26th, 27th, 28th, 29th, and 30th; June 26th, 27th, 29th, and 30th; and July 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, and 6th. For more information please access http://bloodcenter.stanford.edu/news/special_events.html#GLT. For maps and directions for all Stanford Blood Centers, please access http://bloodcenter.stanford.edu/bcinfo/maps.html.


Announcements: May 5, 2009

Organizational Meeting (5/6) for Kids Day at Clark: Wednesday, May 6, 2009, from 12:30 PM to 1:30 PM in Clark, S360. Bring your planning ideas to the meeting as we organize the Friday, June 12th, "Kids Day at Clark." Join us to discuss how to make an impact for the next generation of scientists and engineers! If you want to get involved, but you can't make it to the meeting, please write to: Jill Sakata.

Announcements: May 1, 2009

Avon Walk for Breast Cancer: Saturday and Sunday, July 11-12, 2009, from the Golden Gate Bridge to the Sausalito waterfront and back again. Registrants will walk up to 26.2 miles on Saturday and 13.1 miles on Sunday. For information on how to register, please access http://walk.avonfoundation.org/site/PageServer?pagename=sanf_home_2k8.

Announcements: April 17, 2009

CCNE Nano-Bio Seminar Series Presents Donald E. Ingber, MD, PhD, "From Biological Design Principles to Bioinspired Nanotechnologies": Tuesday, April 21st; Seminar & Discussion from 4:30-5:30 PM; Reception from 5:30-6:00 PM; in the Clark Auditorium, S001, Clark Building at Stanford University.

Donald E. Ingber, MD, PhD
Director, Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering
Judah Folkman Professor of Vascular Biology, Harvard Medical School and Children's Hospital
Professor of Bioengineering, Harvard School of Engineering & Applied Sciences

Abstract:
The burgeoning field of Nanotechnology offers exciting new approaches to attack fundamental questions in biology, create smart medical devices, and positively impact human health. Creation of biologically-inspired nanotechnologies also could revolutionize how materials are designed and manufactured for industrial, aerospace, and military applications. But the fields are constrained by a lack of understanding of how living cells and tissues are constructed so that they exhibit their incredible organic properties, including their ability to change shape, move, grow, and self-heal. These are properties we strive to mimic, but we cannot yet build manmade materials that exhibit these features, or develop devices to selectively control these behaviors. To accomplish this, we must . . .

uncover the underlying design principles that govern how cells and tissues form and function as hierarchical assemblies of nanometer scale components. In this lecture, I will review work from my laboratory and others, which has begun to reveal these design principles that permit self-assembly of 3D structures with great robustness, mechanical strength, and biochemical efficiency, even though they are composed of many thousands of flexible molecular scale components. We also are beginning to understand that biological materials are simultaneously "structure and catalyst": the molecular lattices that form the frameworks of our cells and tissues combine mechanical functions and solid-phase biochemical processing activities. In the course of the lecture, I also will describe how recently developed nanotechnologies have been used to create model systems for biological studies, and how they have led to new approaches to interface living cells with microchips, control mammalian cell and tissue development, and probe the process of mechanotransduction--how cells sense mechanical forces and convert them into biochemical responses. Finally, the more fundamental question of how nanoscale structural networks impact information processing (signal transduction) networks to control cellular "decision-making" also will be explored. Understanding of these design principles that govern biological organization is critical for any nanotechnologist who wants to harness the power of biology.

Sponsored by: Center for Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence Focused on Therapy Response(CCNE-TR) Program--NIH/NCI U54

Hosted by: Sanjiv Sam Gambhir, MD, PhD, and the Departments of Radiology and Bioengineering

Announcements: April 14, 2009

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10th Annual Student-Organized "An Art Affair," Stanford's Largest Arts Festival: Thursday, Friday, and Saturday (April 16th-18th) in White Plaza (free and open to the public). The art festival offers three days of artwork, performances, and interactive art with over 90 Stanford student visual artists and photographers displaying their work; an artist reception; DJ and dessert party; and film screening. Twelve ASSU Arts Grant recipients will also be displaying their work from their winter quarter projects, and there will be over 50 performances from Stanford arts groups, including music, dance, and theater. Contact Bria at bria@stanford.edu for more information or access http://soca.stanford.edu for a complete schedule.

Announcements: December 4, 2008

Free Noon Concert by the Voice Students of Claire Giovannetti: 12:15 PM on Friday, December 5, 2008, at the Campbell Recital Hall in the Braun Music Center. Bring your lunch with you and listen to some great music! For more information, please contact Raina Cornejo.

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The Radiology Interest Group at Stanford (RIGS) "Meet and Greet" will include a panel discussion, a light dinner, and informal socializing with the faculty. Please bring your questions about radiology and life as a radiologist. Faculty from both diagnostic and interventional radiology at Stanford as well as residents and fellows will be present. Please RSVP to Bhargav Raman (ramanb@stanford.edu).

RIGS supports "interest in the field of radiology and provides advice to those who wish to pursue radiology as a career. RIGS holds events to provide medical students a better idea of what radiology is and what the various imaging specialties are, to guide those applying to residencies in this field, and to encourage women and minorities to consider a career in radiology; these events also allow medical students the opportunity to meet radiology physicians and residents. In addition, RIGS is a resource for those interested in research opportunities in the field of radiology" (from the RIGS Web site at http://rigs.stanford.edu/). Please contact Harpreet Dhatt (harpsd@gmail.com) for more information.

To read prior Radiology Interest Group at Stanford (RIGS) postings, please access http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2007/11/radiology_inter_1.html and http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2007/08/inside_terroris_1.html.

Announcements: July 29, 2008

JP Morgan Chase Corporate Challenge: Wednesday, September 17, 2008, at 6:45 PM at Crissy Field Presidio in San Francisco. The 24th running of San Francisco's JP Morgan Chase Corporate Challenge is this September and provides an opportunity for companies to put together teams with a minimum of four members and no maximum number. To participate in this 3.5 mile run/walk, you must be part of a corporate team. If you are interested in forming a team from Stanford, please contact Paul Richardson, financial analyst in the SoM Blood and Marrow Transplantation Division, at (650) 725-1745 or paulr77@stanford.edu. For each participant who enters the Corporate Challenge, JP Morgan will make a donation to YMCA's Claire Lilienthal Learning Academy, a Presidio Community YMCA program that provides a safe space for learning for each student attending Claire Lilienthal Alternative School.

Last year, there were 5,340 runners and walkers who completed the 3.5 mile course from 233 companies. A total of 15 companies (5 from the men's division; 5 from the women's division; and 5 from the mixed divisions) will be invited to compete in the JP Morgan Chase Corporate Challenge Championship, on Saturday, October 4th, in New York City.

Announcements: June 26, 2008

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The Grand Opening of our new Stanford Medicine Imaging Center, Palo Alto, (451 Sherman Avenue) will be this Friday, June 27th, from 5:00 PM to 7:00 PM. Please come to our evening reception and take a tour of our new facility to celebrate our Grand Opening!

Date: Friday, June 27th
Time: 5-7 PM
Location : 451 Sherman Avenue
Light Fare, Wine, Music

Sherman Avenue is located one block south of Palo Alto's California Avenue business district, adjacent to the Olive Garden Restaurant, and just a half block east of El Camino Real. Public parking is available in lots located along Sherman Avenue.

RSVP to: cestades@stanfordmed.org or (650) 723-4527

Announcements: April 4, 2008

Lunchtime Barbecue to Celebrate Stanford School of Medicine's 100th Anniversary on April 23, 2008: A birthday BBQ lunch will be held on the Dean's Lawn (Campus Drive and Roth Way) from 11:30 AM to 1:30 PM on Wednesday, April 23, 2008. The Stanford School of Medicine (SOM) is celebrating a 100-year birthday, and all faculty, staff, and students are invited! For details, please read the following birthday party invitation from the April 2, 2008 Medical Center Report published by the SOM Office of Communication and Public Affairs:

A Birthday Party Invitation

All faculty, students, and staff are invited to celebrate the School of Medicine's 100th anniversary at a lunchtime barbecue on April 23.

Everyone coming will have a chance to make a contribution to history: attendees are invited to bring a contemporary item that reflects the "spirit of the present" for a time capsule that will be opened in 100 years.

Philip Pizzo, MD, dean of the medical school, will offer some remarks at the lunch, which will also feature music from a ragtime band.

Items for the time capsule don't have to be related to the medical school but simply represent the spirit of our times. Some suggestions include: a Stanford ID badge, a personal statement of "Life at Stanford in 2008," predictions for 2108, photographs or CDs, electronics (such as memory sticks), course catalogues or periodicals. Items may not be perishable or contain liquid and must be no bigger than a cubic foot.

Centennial organizers will also have guest books available to students, staff, and faculty to sign with written memories or predictions for 2108. People are also invited to submit their predictions and memories to the Centennial Web site at http://med.stanford.edu/centennial/guestbook.html.

The lunch will be held on the Dean's Lawn (Campus Drive and Roth Way) from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Shuttle service will be available for transportation from off-site locations. For more details on the lunch and other Centennial events, see the Centennial Web site at http://med.stanford.edu/centennial/events.html.

Announcements: March 14, 2008

Robert J. Gropler, MD, to Speak on "Diabetic Cardiomyopathy: Use of Imaging to Cross the Translational Divide": Monday, March 17th, seminar from 4:30 PM to 5:15 PM; discussion from 5:15 PM to 5:30 PM; and reception from 5:30 PM to 6:00 PM in the Clark Center Auditorium. As part of the Molecular Imaging Seminar Series, the Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford (MIPS) and Philips present Robert J. Gropler, MD, professor of radiology, medicine, and biomedical engineering from the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, Missouri. Dr. Gropler will be speaking on "Diabetic Cardiomyopathy: Use of Imaging to Cross the Translational Divide." Please find his abstract as well as directions to his talk below. This seminar is hosted by Drs. Sanjiv Sam Gambhir, MD, PhD, and Edward Graves, PhD.

Abstract:
There is a growing epidemic of diabetes mellitus in the United States with a projected increase of 30% in the prevalence of this disease over the next 10 years. Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in these patients. The myocardial metabolic phenotype of the diabetic heart (an over-dependence on fatty acid metabolism) appears to be an important contributor to the left ventricular dysfunction observed in these patients. Our work has focused on optimizing PET techniques to provide quantitative measurements of myocardial substrate metabolism in rodents that are applicable to the human heart. We are then applying these methods to better characterize the metabolic perturbations of the diabetic heart, including their contribution to left ventricular dysfunction, and the potential role of novel therapeutic approaches to reduce the cardiovascular manifestations of this disease.

Directions:
From the 101 Freeway exit on University Ave South/West: Proceed for several miles on University Ave., which becomes Palm Dr. after you pass El Camino Real. Take Palm Dr. past Arboretum Rd. Then, turn right on Campus Drive, and follow this road directly to the Clark Building.

From the 280 Freeway exit Sand Hill Rd. East: Follow this road for several miles. Take a right on Arboretum Rd. Then, take a left on Quarry Rd. Then, turn right on Campus Drive, and follow this road directly to the Clark Building. Turn right into the parking lot before the stop sign at Welch Road and Campus Drive. Parking is free after 4:00 PM right next to the Clark Building. If you have questions, please contact Susan Singh at 650-736-9781.


Announcements: March 13, 2008

**Special Guest Speaker**: Friday, March 14, 2008, from 12:00 PM to 1:00 PM in Lucas RLC P083. Dr. Michael Federle, professor of radiology at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, will deliver a talk entitled "Evaluation of the Incidental or Benign Focal Liver Mass."


Announcements: March 6, 2008

Bruce R. Rosen, MD, PhD, to Speak on Bio-X Frontiers in Interdisciplinary Biosciences: March 13th at 4:15 PM in the Clark Center Auditorium. Bruce R. Rosen, MD, PhD, will deliver a seminar entitled "Frontiers in Multimodal Brain Imaging"; please see his abstract below. Dr. Rosen is the director of the Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging at Massachusetts General Hospital and Professor of Radiology at Harvard Medical School.

Abstract:
The last decade has witnessed an explosion in the growth of our ability to study the workings of the brain. While the tools of molecular biology, neurochemistry, and electrophysiology continue to provide insights into neuronal events at the molecular, synaptic, and cellular levels, a new generation of non-invasive imaging tools has allowed us to extend this understanding from the cellular to the systems level, and from animal models to humans. One technology of particular note was the development of several means to image hemodynamic and metabolic events non-invasively using magnetic resonance. Coupled with advanced methods to quantify the morphological characteristics of cortical and subcortical structures, these "functional magnetic resonance imaging" (fMRI) studies have enabled investigators throughout the world to have an unprecedented view into the workings of the human brain and mind. Systems neuroscientists have applied these methods to map in detail the organization of human vision, hearing, smell, taste, touch, and motor control, and to directly address how our brains are both similar to and different from animal ancestors. Cognitive scientists have extended our understanding to higher order processing of functions like memory and attention, and they have begun detailed studies of distinctly human functions such as language. Scientists in fields as diverse as education and economics now use the tools of functional neuroimaging, and such studies have become powerful cultural icons in connecting the brain with behavior.

Though technological innovation was rapid during the last decade, it is certain to continue at an even more accelerated pace during the next. PET technology will continue to be the dominant means to obtain molecular imaging data, and will provide a direct neurochemical view into the synapse, with and without pharmacological interventions. MRI technology will also advance, and include ever-higher field strength magnets already approaching 12 Tesla. Such systems will allow us to study the building blocks of cortical organization, and permit us to directly map connections between functional regions. New technologies will also emerge, including direct tomographic imaging with light (Diffuse Optical Tomography--DOT) and novel means to combine MRI with electromagnetic recordings acquired with EEG and its magnetic cousin, MEG (magnetoencepholography). These technologies will extend our ability to capture views of brain function in "real time" in all patient populations, including small children, and they will ultimately allow us to test directly new computational and physical models of how the brain works, grows, and is perturbed in disease.

For more information, please contact Fiona Sincock.

Announcements III: March 5, 2008

"Movie Sequence" at Lucas: "The Third Man," Wednesday, March 5th, around 6 PM in the Lucas Learning Center.

"The Third Man"
(1949) British film noir, voted Best British film of all time . . . .
Director: Carol Reed
Screenplay: by Graham Greene
Starring: Joseph Cotten, Alida Valli, and Orson Welles
Place: Austria's capital city, Vienna
Time: Just after the Second World War when the city was divided into four zones controlled by the Allied powers of Great Britain, France,
the USA, and the USSR. For a movie synopsis, please access http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Third_Man.

"In Italy, for thirty years under the Borgias, they had warfare,
terror, murder, bloodshed--they produced Michelangelo, Leonardo da
Vinci, and the Renaissance. In Switzerland, they had brotherly love,
they had five hundred years of democracy and peace, and what did that
produce? The cuckoo clock."

Please join us!
Erika, Chardonnay, and Ulrich


For the "Movie Sequence" online calendar, please visit
http://www.google.com/calendar/embed?src=movie.sequence%40gmail.com&ctz=A

Announcements II: March 5, 2008

RecycleMania: January 27th through April 5th the Competition Continues between Stanford and 400 Campuses around the Country (www.recyclemaniacs.org).

By recycling, you help to

create jobs,

spur investment from the private sector,

promote economic growth, and

support innovation

(all that,
just by
recycling).


From Julie Muir of PSSI/Stanford Recycling:
"Stanford is placing in the Top 10 in most categories and beating Harvard and Yale (except notable total waste produced #84 out of 89-- ouch!). If we could just recycle 10 more pounds of recyclables per person, we could take on the top five schools in the Per Capita Recycling Contest--check your garbage bin! Take a look at the results for the California competition--I think you will be impressed!"

Want to see the RecycleMania results for yourself? New results are posted each Friday. Click here http://recyclemaniacs.org/results.aspx#whole

What's recyclable on campus? Click here: http://recycling.stanford.edu/recycling/acceptable.html

Want a desktop recycling tray? See one here: http://recycling.stanford.edu/recycling/other.html

Want someone to come to your department or hall/house to talk about the campus recycling program? Email juliem@pssi.stanford.edu

Want more information on Special Event Recycling? Click here: http://recycling.stanford.edu/specialevent/seindex.html

Want to learn more about how recycling at Stanford reduces GHG emissions, energy use, and pollution? Click here:
http://recycling.stanford.edu/5r/benefits.html

Announcements I: March 5, 2008

Professor Lucio Frydman to Give Talk Entitled: "NMR and MRI Applications of Spatially Encoded Ultrafast Spectroscopy": Friday, March 7th, from 11:15 AM to Noon in the Lucas Learning Center. Dr. Frydman is from the Weizman Institute of Science in Rehovot, Israel.

Pizza will be served after Dr. Frydman's presentation. For more information, please contact Betsy Sowder.

Announcements: March 3, 2008

Dr. Alexej Jerschow to Deliver Talk Entitled "23Na and 1H CEST MRI: Contrast in Cartilage and Intervertebral Disc": Friday, March 7th, at 10:00 AM in the Clark Center Auditorium. Associate Professor Alexej Jerschow, from the Department of Chemistry at New York University (NYU), will be visiting Stanford on March 7th to give a talk on his novel work at high field. He will be visiting the Lucas Center afterwards to see our facilities and to meet our scientists over lunch. For more information, please see his abstract below and/or contact Dr. Garry Gold.

Jerschow_400.gif


ABSTRACT:
Glycosaminogycan (GAG) plays numerous vital functions in the human body. GAG concentration [GAG] in vivo is a sensitive biomarker indicative of both osteoarthritis (OA) and intervertebral disc (IVD) degenerative diseases. By exploiting the exchangeable protons of GAG, we demonstrate that one can directly map the localized GAG concentration in vivo using a chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) method. This gagCEST approach is presented on both human cartilage and animal discs. We also show the observation of the Nuclear Overhauser Effect (NOE) from macromolecules in tissue, which contributes significantly to the CEST/MT contrast mechanism in MRI and may lead to further diagnostic abilities. GAG contrast may also be enhanced by employing intermolecular multiple-quantum coherences.

Monitoring the bound sodium pool can be an important tool for assessing the onset of tissue disorders. Practical clinical 23Na MRI methods, furthermore, often do not allow one to use sufficiently small voxel sizes such that only the tissue of interest is seen, and a large signal contamination can arise from sodium in synovial fluid. Methods are presented for the clean separation between the signal from bound or ordered 23Na over that of free 23Na, which is particularly important and can greatly enhance the potential of 23Na-MRI as a diagnostic tool. 23Na MRI also offers the possibility of monitoring local anisotropic motion. 3T and 7T in vivo volumetric 23Na images are presented. Monitoring GAGs via 23Na or CEST can also be important for assessing heart valves or corneae.

References:
W. Ling, R. R. Regatte, G. Navon, A. Jerschow, Assessment of Glycosaminoglycan Concentration in Vivo by Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer (gagCEST). Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. USA, in press 2008, http://www.pnas.org/cgi/content/abstract/0707666105v1.

W. Ling, R. R. Regatte, M. E. Schweitzer, A. Jerschow. Characterization of Bovine Patellar Cartilage by NMR. NMR Biomed., in press 2008, http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/cgi-bin/abstract/114294661/ABSTRACT.

Announcements: February 25, 2008

Parking Changes at the School of Medicine: Lots 15 and 16 on March 1, 2008.
The following is a memorandum jointly composed by several campus offices, including the School of Medicine Office of Facilities, Planning, and Management (OFPM), the Diversity and Access Office, and the Office of Parking and Transportation, that describes the changes that will take place on March 1st and the individuals and offices that you should contact with your questions or concerns.

MEMORANDUM . . .

With excitement we announce that on March 1, 2008, the School will break ground on the Learning and Knowledge Center (LKC). The relocation of the RAF Ramp will follow the ground breaking for the Learning and Knowledge Center by a matter of weeks. And then, as many of you are aware, we plan to break ground on the new Stanford Institute of Medicine building toward mid-summer. To accomplish these projects, Whiting-Turner Contracting, our general contractor for all three jobs, has informed us that they will need the entire L-15 and L16 parking lot area.

Effective March 1, 2008: Lot 15 will close displacing all remaining parking between Beckman and the Clark Center. With the closure, both L-15 lottery parking and the "D permit" pilot programs will end. The A-Carpool, Service Vehicle, and metered parking will all be moved out of the L-15 lot. The current entrance to the parking lot at the Clark Center will become a construction and delivery only entrance. There will be a flagman at Campus Drive to greet vehicles entering the delivery and construction area. Due to liability, there will be no exceptions--if your vehicle is not a construction vehicle or a commercial delivery vehicle, please do not get in the queue to enter this parking lot.

Individual Parking:
1. The D-Parking Pilot Program will terminate effective March 1st. Refunds and/or payroll deduction amounts will be adjusted according to how you decide to replace your D parking on March 1st. Please contact the Parking & Transportation Services customer service supervisor at 725-0594 to discuss your future parking preference, adjust your payroll deductions, or refund your unused parking fees.

2. The meters will be moved mostly to the ground level of Parking Structure-1, although there will also be a few spots in the Gates Lot.

3. A-Carpool parking spaces will be relocated to Parking Structure-1 and the L-18 Stockfarm surface lot.

4. A-permit holders, who were formally lottery permit holders, will find parking in Parking Structures-1 and -4 in addition to the Stockfarm and Jordan Quad surface lots and along Welch Road.

Until you feel comfortable with your new parking area, allow yourself a bit more time.

Disability Parking:
Disability parking is available in the following areas:

1. Quarry Extension Lot (L-9)--Located on Campus Drive West

2. Parking Structure 1--Campus Drive West and Roth Way

3. MSOB--Near the Medical School Office Building

4. Parking Structure 2--near Via Ortega and Panama

5. Parking Structure 4--Pasteur & Blake Wilbur Drive

6. Street parking along Welch Road near the Lucas Center

7. Gates Lot--on Campus Drive & North Service Road near Gates Computer Science

Additionally, we will monitor parking utilization in the disabled spaces alongside Pasteur Drive, Welch Rd, in the MSOB Lot and Parking Structure-4 garage. Should disabled parking in these areas be consistently utilized, we will explore increasing disabled parking spaces in nearby areas.

If you have further questions or concerns regarding disability parking, please contact the Diversity & Access office at (650) 725-0326 or diversity.access@stanford.edu.

Shuttle Information:
There are two Marguerite Shuttle lines that stop on Pasteur Drive, behind Edwards (the "Hospital Fountain" stop): the "B Line" (Clockwise (BCW) and Counter-Clockwise (BCCW)) and the "C" line. Both run every 15 and 30 minutes respectively from PS-5 and the Stockfarm lot [L-18]. For a shuttle schedule, please access
http://transportation.stanford.edu/marguerite/MargueriteSched.shtml.

For parkers in the PS-5 garage, there are Marguerite buses that will get you around the medical school, hospital, and elsewhere on campus. In fact, it takes only three minutes for the bus to get from the parking lot to the "Hospital Fountain" stop. Because there are two lines on the same route, you wouldn't have to wait more than eight minutes for a bus, often less than that. Both lines offer wheelchair lifts or and/or lowering in the front to ease boarding.

We apologize in advance for the inconvenience and added time that the changes to the L-15 and L-16 parking lots are likely to cause you. When the LKC and site work are complete, there will be a new small parking area at the front of the school. This lot will be primarily disabled and metered parking and should hold approximately 40-45 vehicles.

Deliveries: Deliveries will be possible at each of the following places. There will be only a few spots at any particular place so we suggest that you find a time and place wherein you are able to park in proximity to your destination and deliver according to that schedule.

1. The MSOB Lot accessible from Welch Rd will accommodate roughly three delivery trucks at one time.

2. The Lucas turnaround accessible from Welch Rd will accommodate one,
possibly two trucks at one time but is not meant for long-term parking.

3. The Quarry Rd Parking Lot accessible via Roth Way from Campus Drive
has been re-modeled to support three large trucks parked on the diagonal and 10 smaller delivery vehicles. These small delivery vehicle spots are also available for small contractors.

4. The former entrance to the Medical School parking lot will be open
for deliveries. To the right of the entrance alongside the Clark Center is an area that will support three delivery trucks. Towards the center of the parking lot in front of the Whiting-Turner trailer is space for six to eight more delivery vehicles and even closer to the center there is space for about four more delivery vehicles. It is important not to cram these areas or it will be impossible to turn around and leave. Additionally, one parking spot towards the center of campus will be assigned to the Praxair truck as it requires a spot for up to six hours a day. If you are a small contractor, the loading zone areas may be used to drop off materials and tools; however, there is no parking allowed at any time.

If you have further questions about the LKC and/or Connective Elements
projects themselves, please contact Maggie Saunders (madaca@stanford.edu) or
Paul Forti (pforti@stanford.edu) or go to http://lkc.stanford.edu/.

Announcements I: February 22, 2008

The MIPS Molecular Imaging Seminar Series Presents Mark M. Davis, PhD: Monday, February 25, 2008, in the Alway Building, Room M114, the reception will be from 4:30 to 5:00 PM, followed by the seminar from 5:00 to 5:45 PM and the discussion from 5:45 to 6:00 PM. Dr. Mark M. Davis is the Burt and Marion Avery Family Professor in the Department of Microbiology and Immunology. He will be presenting a talk entitled "Biochemistry by Other Means: Using Imaging to Deconstruct T Cell Recognition." His talk is sponsored by the Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford (MIPS); hosted by Sanjiv Sam Gambhir, MD, PhD; and supported by Philips. If you have questions, please contact Susan Singh.


Announcements II: February 21, 2008

Haas Center and the Tradition of Public Service at Stanford: Tuesday, February 26th, from 5:00 to 6:30 PM in Building 320, Room 105, of the Geology Corner. The founding director of the Haas Center, Catherine Milton, will be delivering a talk on the Haas Center and the tradition of public service at Stanford sponsored by the Stanford Historical Society. Ms. Milton is currently a visiting fellow at the John Gardner Center for Youth and Their Communities in the School of Education. For questions, please contact Charlotte Kwok Glasser at (650) 725-3332 or stanfordhist@stanford.edu.

Announcements I: February 21, 2008

"Representing Uncertainty via the Logarithm of Odds": Monday, February 25th, at 1:00 PM in the Clark Center S360. Kilian Pohl, PhD, from Harvard Medical School will be delivering a lecture on "Representing Uncertainty via the Logarithm of Odds." In this talk, Dr. Pohl will describe a new representation for capturing the uncertainty of objects in images based on the logarithm of odds. This representation addresses several problems in vision as it provides an intrinsic, probabilistic representation for combining and deforming objects. He will show how this representation preserves the statistical characteristics of interpolated shapes, which is an important aspect for many longitudinal neuroscience studies. He will also use the technology in order to solve the mean-field approximation in the level set framework. Conventional likelihood models are combined with a curve length prior on boundaries, and an approximate posterior distribution on labels is sought via the mean field approach. Optimizing the resulting estimator by gradient descent leads to a level set style algorithm where the level set functions are the logarithm of odds encoding of the posterior label probabilities. Applications with more than two labels are easily accommodated. The label assignment is accomplished by the maximum a posteriori rule, so there are no problems of "overlap" or "vacuum."

BIOGRAPHY:
Kilian Pohl received his doctorate in computer science from the Medical Vision Lab at MIT and is currently an instructor for Harvard Medical School. His main research area is computational image analysis with an emphasis on studying statistical models from a Bayesian perspective. Kilian has been the recipient of several awards such as last year's Medical Image Analysis--Medical Image Computing and Computer-Assisted Intervention (MICCAI) '06 Best Paper Prize for his publication, "Using the Logarithm of Odds to Define a Vector Space on Probabilistic Atlases." For more details about his research, please visit his website at http://people.csail.mit.edu/pohl.

Announcements: February 1, 2008

Special Research Conference with Dr. Bitton: Monday, February, 4, 2008, at 4:00PM in the Lucas Learning Center (Lucas expansion, basement level), P083.
The MIPS Molecular Imaging Seminar Series Presents Robin P. Choudhury, MA, DM, MRCP: Monday, February 4, 2008, in the School of Medicine's Alway Building, room M114, at 4:30-5:15 PM, followed by a discussion from 5:15-5:30 PM, and a reception from 5:30-6:00 PM.

Special Research Conference with Dr. Bitton: Monday, February, 4, 2008 at 4:00PM in the Lucas Learning Center (Lucas expansion, basement level), P083. Dr. Rachel Bitton will be presenting a talk entitled "A High Frequency Array-Based Photoacoustic Microscopy System for Non-Invasive Vascular Imaging." Dr. Bitton recently received her PhD in biomedical engineering from the University of Southern California. Please find the abstract for her talk below. If you have questions, please contact Donna Cronister.


ABSTRACT:
The development of new approaches to biomedical imaging is fueled by the manifest need for high speed, high resolution, non-invasive techniques able to visualize high contrast tissue structures such as microvessels. Laser induced high frequency photoacoustic microscopy is a hybrid imaging modality based on the intrinsic optical properties of biological tissue and ultrasonic detection at high frequencies (>20MHz). In this talk, a novel design for a photoacoustic imaging system using a 30MHz transducer array and 16 channel custom receive electronics is presented. This system is able to produce photoacoustic images of phantoms, as well as small animal microvasculature in-vivo. The applications for this type of photoacoustic microscopy can extend to real-time high frequency imaging, functional imaging, and multi-modal capabilities by overlaying ultrasonic and photoacoustic images, while offering a unique prospect to visualize cancer-related angiogenesis.


The MIPS Molecular Imaging Seminar Series Presents Robin P. Choudhury, MA, DM, MRCP: Monday, February 4, 2008, in the School of Medicine's Alway Building, room M114, at 4:30-5:15 PM, followed by a discussion from 5:15-5:30 PM, and a reception from 5:30-6:00 PM. Dr. Choudhury is a Wellcome Trust Intermediate Clinical Research Fellow and honorary consultant radiologist at John Radcliffe Hospital, Oxford. She will present a seminar entitled "Microparticles of Iron Oxide for Molecular MRI." Please find her abstract below. Her talk is sponsored by the Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford (MIPS); hosted by Sanjiv Sam Gambhir, MD, PhD, and Edward Graves, PhD; and supported by Philips. If you have questions, please contact Susan Singh.


ABSTRACT:
Micro-particles of iron oxide (MPIO) have been used for cellular imaging and tracking. For some molecular imaging applications, the size of these particles would preclude delivery to the site of interest. However, for imaging endovascular targets, MPIO possess several positive attributes. Firstly, MPIO conveys a payload of iron that is orders of magnitude greater than ultra-small particles of iron oxide (USPIO). Secondly, the effects of MPIO on local magnetic field homogeneity, and therefore detectable contrast, extend a distance many times their physical diameter. Thirdly, once bound to endothelium, MPIO remain intravascular, thereby allowing bound MPIO to be readily distinguished from the vessel wall. Finally, conjugated MPIO may offer a generic tool for imaging endothelial-specific markers across a range of vascular pathologies. Accordingly, we have adopted a MPIO-based approach for targeted MRI and applied this to the detection of adhesion molecules on the arterial endothelium (atherosclerosis and brain inflammation) and activated platelets (arterial thrombosis and cerebral malaria).

Announcements III: January 22, 2008

Special Seminar Series on Radiological Informatics: As part of a special series on radiological informatics, we are offering seminars on Jan. 23rd, 24th, 28th, and 31st. Please click on the "Continue Reading This Entry" link below to find the title of each talk as well as the presenter's abstract and biography. In addition to the seminars listed below, there will be a few more talks, which are being scheduled now and will be posted shortly. Please contact Dr. Sandy Napel for more information.


1) Wednesday, January 23rd, at noon; Alway M104
Julia Patriarche, PhD
Mayo Clinic

Title:
"Detection of Change in Serial Magnetic Resonance Studies of Brain Tumor Patients"

Abstract:
The comparison of serial magnetic resonance imaging studies is a common task in clinical radiology. It is, however, widely considered not to be very reproducible. There are a variety of reasons for this, including the confounding of disease-related changes with acquisition-related changes and issues related to information presentation. We have constructed a computational system that performs the comparison of serial magnetic resonance imaging studies and presents changes in the form of a color-coded change map, superimposed on the anatomical images. The system additionally formats the output as a quantitative summary. We used this quantitative summary to conduct a study with 88 brain tumor serial comparisons. Our results were suggestive that it may be possible to use the change detector to identify cancer changes months earlier than is possible using manual inspection, alone.

We have recently implemented an integrated system for the change detector, which includes a graphical user interface (GUI). The GUI not only displays the color-coded change map, but also allows the user to turn it on and off. The GUI provides linked cursors, and it additionally provides "flicker" functionality to allow the user to rapidly alternate between the serial acquisitions. We are preparing to deploy the GUI change detector clinically, which will greatly increase the size and variety of possible future research studies and which will allow the direct clinical application of this technology.

The change detector is an example of a layered artificial intelligence (AI) architecture in which each layer builds upon the layer below, with each layer accomplishing progressively more sophisticated analyses. Specifically, the change detector is built on a lesion-finder application. The lesion finder is built on an automated sample point's algorithm. The automated sample point's algorithm is built on a significant region detection algorithm. Each of these algorithms has merit in its own right, and each can be used in a modular fashion in a variety of contexts. As a unified application, they together automatically address a complex clinical task. Early detection of changes may facilitate improved care through more rapid intervention following recurrence. It may also facilitate screening and personalized therapy. We additionally see the change detector as providing a solution to the problem of novel therapy comparison, by providing fully automatic, reproducible, and quantitative measures of change. We envision the change detector as a model of layered artificial intelligence, not only freeing the radiologist from the drudgery of information overload, but providing a model whereby greater information will enable many sophisticated automatic analyses by the computer, with the computer bringing to the attention of the clinician only what is relevant.

Biography:
Julia Patriarche is an informatics fellow in the Radiology Informatics Lab at the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine. She has completed an undergraduate degree in electrical engineering/computer engineering option at Queen's University in Kingston, Canada; a PhD in medical science/medical imaging; and a neurology fellowship at the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine.


2) Thursday, January 24th, at noon; Alway M112
Ross Mitchell, PhD
University of Calgary

Title:
"Virtual Biopsies: Non-Invasive Molecular Diagnosis"

Abstract:
Our expanding knowledge of the genetic basis and molecular mechanisms of cancer is beginning to revolutionize the practice of clinical oncology. Increasingly, molecular biomarkers of prognosis and treatment response are being used to classify tumors and direct treatment decisions. Advanced medical imaging platforms such as MRI, PET, and CT provide incredibly detailed images of tumors that reflect their structure, biochemistry, physiology, and perhaps genetics.

Studies by the Imaging Informatics Lab at the University of Calgary, and others, show that information about a tumor's molecular phenotype can be obtained by using novel algorithms and computational tools to more fully analyze tumor images. Such "virtual biopsies," performed by applying these image-processing techniques to routine diagnostic images (e.g. MRI, PET, or CT), could be a rapid and powerful means of assaying important cancer biomarkers. If successfully validated, and proven to have suitable sensitivity and specificity, the use of non-invasive, imaging-based molecular diagnostic tests would offer significant advantages over conventional surgical biopsies. For example, this could be important in the context of large heterogeneous tumors, multiple metastases, surgically inaccessible tumors, and settings where disease progression needs to be monitored frequently over time. Virtual biopsy research lies at the intersection of molecular imaging, medical imaging physics, and biocomputation, and is highly complementary to these areas. This presentation will cover key enabling technologies behind virtual biopsies and discuss some recent successes in this research.


Biography: Dr. Ross Mitchell is an associate professor of the Departments of Radiology and Clinical Neurosciences and an adjunct professor of the Department of Computer Science at the University of Calgary. He is also the founding and chief scientist of Calgary Scientific Incorporated, a Multiple Sclerosis Society of Canada; a Donald Paty Scholar; and an Alberta Heritage Foundation for Medical Research Senior Scholar. Dr. Mitchell has received numerous awards for his research including the Berlex Canada MS Research Award; several Dean's Awards of Excellence from the University of Western Ontario; Best Paper Awards from the Canadian Association of Radiologists and the International Organization for Medical Physics; and two Awards of Merit from the Radiological Society of North America. Dr. Mitchell has a proven research track-record comprising 11 patents, 73 invited presentations, 63 peer-reviewed articles, and 150 published abstracts.

Dr. Mitchell supervises a research team investigating space/frequency analysis, medical image processing, as well as segmentation and visualization technologies. For more information, please see, http://www.ImagingInformatics.ca.


3) Monday, January 28th, at noon; Alway M104
Jianming Liang, PhD
Siemens Medical Solutions USA Inc., Malvern, PA

Title:
"Dynamic Chest Image Analysis, United Snakes, and
Computer-Aided Detection"

Abstract:
Modern medical imaging systems generate enormous datasets with ever higher coverage and resolution, but it is the clinically relevant information in these images that is paramount. I shall present several novel computational approaches for gleaning such information from chest X-ray images to reveal pulmonary functional abnormalities, for segmenting and characterizing organ motions, and for detecting the most lethal diseases from CT images, including pulmonary embolism and colonic polyps. The former approach has yielded model-based analysis and visualization methods for revealing focal and general abnormalities of lung ventilation and perfusion based on a sequence of digital chest fluoroscopy frames collected with the dynamic pulmonary imaging (DPI) technique.

In particular, I shall present a novel multiresolutional method with an explicit ventilation/perfusion analysis model, as well as "United Snakes," an interactive deformable model framework for lung registration and motion analysis, cardiac shape and motion analysis, and other applications. Finally, I will introduce a fast yet effective concentration-oriented tobogganing technique for efficient local artery/vein separation and multiple instance classification for the automated detection of pulmonary embolism from CT pulmonary angiography (CTPA), and a virtual colonoscopy technique that simplifies the complex 3D-polyp detection problem into a 2D-disk identification problem, significantly improving sensitivity while reducing computation time.

Biography:
Dr. Jianming Liang is a staff scientist at Siemens Medical Solutions USA, Inc., where he has been engaged in research and development activities in the domain of computer-aided diagnosis in medical imaging since December 2002. He holds a PhD degree (2001) in computer science and carried out his thesis work at the Turku Centre for Computer Science in Finland and in the Visual Modeling Group at the University of Toronto in Canada. From 2001-02, he was a Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC) of Canada Industrial Research Fellow. His research on dynamic chest image analysis received a University Faculty Research Award from the University of Turku. His other prizes include a Siemens Recognition Award and a Best Paper Award at the 2007 International Congress of Computer Assisted Radiology and Surgery in Berlin, Germany.

4) Thursday, January 31st, at noon; location TBA
Daniel Rubin, MS, MD
Stanford University

Announcements II: January 15, 2008

Special Seminar Series on Radiological Informatics: As part of a special series on radiological informatics, we are offering seminars on Jan. 23rd, 24th, 28th, and 31st. Please watch future announcements for each seminar's title and abstract. In addition to the seminars listed below, there will be a few more talks, which are being scheduled now and will be posted shortly. Please contact Dr. Sandy Napel for more information.

1) Wednesday, January 23rd, at noon; location TBA
Julia Patriarche, PhD
Mayo Clinic

Title:
"Detection of Change in Serial Magnetic Resonance Studies of Brain Tumor Patients"

Abstract:
The comparison of serial magnetic resonance imaging studies is a common task in clinical radiology. It is, however, widely considered not to be very reproducible. There are a variety of reasons for this, including the confounding of disease-related changes with acquisition-related changes and issues related to information presentation. We have constructed a computational system that performs the comparison of serial magnetic resonance imaging studies and presents changes in the form of a color-coded change map, superimposed on the anatomical images. The system additionally formats the output as a quantitative summary. We used this quantitative summary to conduct a study with 88 brain tumor serial comparisons. Our results were suggestive that it may be possible to use the change detector to identify cancer changes months earlier than is possible using manual inspection, alone.

We have recently implemented an integrated system for the change detector, which includes a graphical user interface (GUI). The GUI not only displays the color-coded change map, but also allows the user to turn it on and off. The GUI provides linked cursors, and it additionally provides "flicker" functionality to allow the user to rapidly alternate between the serial acquisitions. We are preparing to deploy the GUI change detector clinically, which will greatly increase the size and variety of possible future research studies and which will allow the direct clinical application of this technology.

The change detector is an example of a layered artificial intelligence (AI) architecture in which each layer builds upon the layer below, with each layer accomplishing progressively more sophisticated analyses. Specifically, the change detector is built on a lesion-finder application. The lesion finder is built on an automated sample point's algorithm. The automated sample point's algorithm is built on a significant region detection algorithm. Each of these algorithms has merit in its own right, and each can be used in a modular fashion in a variety of contexts. As a unified application, they together automatically address a complex clinical task. Early detection of changes may facilitate improved care through more rapid intervention following recurrence. It may also facilitate screening and personalized therapy. We additionally see the change detector as providing a solution to the problem of novel therapy comparison, by providing fully automatic, reproducible, and quantitative measures of change. We envision the change detector as a model of layered artificial intelligence, not only freeing the radiologist from the drudgery of information overload, but providing a model whereby greater information will enable many sophisticated automatic analyses by the computer, with the computer bringing to the attention of the clinician only what is relevant.

Biography:
Julia Patriarche is an informatics fellow in the Radiology Informatics Lab at the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine. She has completed an undergraduate degree in electrical engineering/computer engineering option at Queen's University in Kingston, Canada; a PhD in medical science/medical imaging; and a neurology fellowship at the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine.


2) Thursday, January 24th, at noon; location TBA
Ross Mitchell, PhD

University of Calgary

Title:
"Virtual Biopsies: Non-Invasive Molecular Diagnosis"

Abstract:
Our expanding knowledge of the genetic basis and molecular mechanisms of cancer is beginning to revolutionize the practice of clinical oncology. Increasingly, molecular biomarkers of prognosis and treatment response are being used to classify tumors and direct treatment decisions. Advanced medical imaging platforms such as MRI, PET, and CT provide incredibly detailed images of tumors that reflect their structure, biochemistry, physiology, and perhaps genetics.

Studies by the Imaging Informatics Lab at the University of Calgary, and others, show that information about a tumor's molecular phenotype can be obtained by using novel algorithms and computational tools to more fully analyze tumor images. Such "virtual biopsies," performed by applying these image-processing techniques to routine diagnostic images (e.g. MRI, PET, or CT), could be a rapid and powerful means of assaying important cancer biomarkers. If successfully validated, and proven to have suitable sensitivity and specificity, the use of non-invasive, imaging-based molecular diagnostic tests would offer significant advantages over conventional surgical biopsies. For example, this could be important in the context of large heterogeneous tumors, multiple metastases, surgically inaccessible tumors, and settings where disease progression needs to be monitored frequently over time. Virtual biopsy research lies at the intersection of molecular imaging, medical imaging physics, and biocomputation, and is highly complementary to these areas. This presentation will cover key enabling technologies behind virtual biopsies and discuss some recent successes in this research.

MitchellR_200.jpg
Biography: Dr. Ross Mitchell is an associate professor of the Departments of Radiology and Clinical Neurosciences and an adjunct professor of the Department of Computer Science at the University of Calgary. He is also the founding and chief scientist of Calgary Scientific Incorporated, a Multiple Sclerosis Society of Canada; a Donald Paty Scholar; and an Alberta Heritage Foundation for Medical Research Senior Scholar. Dr. Mitchell has received numerous awards for his research including the Berlex Canada MS Research Award; several Dean's Awards of Excellence from the University of Western Ontario; Best Paper Awards from the Canadian Association of Radiologists and the International Organization for Medical Physics; and two Awards of Merit from the Radiological Society of North America. Dr. Mitchell has a proven research track-record comprising 11 patents, 73 invited presentations, 63 peer-reviewed articles, and 150 published abstracts.

Dr. Mitchell supervises a research team investigating space/frequency analysis, medical image processing, as well as segmentation and visualization technologies. For more information, please see, http://www.ImagingInformatics.ca.


3) Monday, January 28th, at noon; location TBA
Jianming Liang, PhD
Siemens Medical Solutions

4) Thursday, January 31st, at noon; location TBA
Daniel Rubin, MS, MD
Stanford University

Announcements I: January 10, 2008

Special Seminar Series on Radiological Informatics: As part of a special series on radiological informatics, we are offering seminars on Jan. 14th, 23rd, and 28th. Each seminar is at 12 noon in Alway M104 unless otherwise indicated. Please watch future announcements for each seminar's title and abstract. In addition to the three seminars listed below, there will be at least two more talks, which are being scheduled now and will be posted shortly. Please contact Dr. Sandy Napel for more information.

1) Monday, Jan 14th:
James Z. Wang, PhD
Carnegie Mellon University and Pennsylvania State University

Title:
"A Data-Driven Approach Toward Knowledge Discovery and Improving Healthcare"

Abstract:
Radiology and biomedical informatics are revolutionizing healthcare. It has been predicted that a shortage of trained radiologists will continue in the next three decades. Effective computerized tools will therefore be in great demand. Radiology departments today generate an incredibly massive amount of digital medical images and metadata. Conventional PACS search methods allow physicians to locate images using metadata stored in relational databases. Much more can be done to leverage this wealth of data. Using massively parallel computers, we can mine millions of electronic medical records and millions of high-resolution, high-dimensional, multi-spectrum medical images to draw conclusions statistically based on past cases. We need to invent computational methods to harness the breathtaking quantity of digital information effectively and to generate biomedical knowledge at a pace we could not have imagined. In the last decade, my research group attempted to reduce the significant gap between low-level features extracted from images and high-level semantic concepts. Machine learning, statistical modeling, and mathematical tools have been utilized. I will introduce some of our past research results of relevance to the radiology community. Specifically, the talk will cover the SIMPLIcity visual similarity search, the 3-D hidden Markov models for analyzing volume images, the Automatic Linguistic Indexing of Pictures system, and the ontology-based annotation and retrieval of histological images and quantitative phenotypes. In the coming years, I plan to collaborate with radiologists, physicians, and biologists in order to develop indexing, retrieval, and mining algorithms and systems for large amounts of radiological images and patient-specific data.

Biography:
James Z. Wang is currently a visiting professor at the Robotics Institute of Carnegie Mellon University. He is also a tenured faculty member at Pennsylvania State University. He received a summa cum laude bachelor's degree in mathematics and computer science from the University of Minnesota. From Stanford University, Dr. Wang has received an MS in mathematics, an MS in computer science, and a PhD degree in medical information sciences. He has been a recipient of a National Science Foundation (NSF) Career award and the endowed PNC Technologies Career Development Professorship. Research interests of his group include automatic image tagging, semantics-sensitive image retrieval, image security, biomedical informatics, computational aesthetics, story picturing, art image retrieval, and computer vision. The group has published two monographs and more than 20 journal articles. Science media including Discovery News, Scientific American, National Public Radio, and MIT Technology Review, as well as wired news agencies, have reported his research.


2) Wednesday, January 23rd:
Julia Patriarche, PhD
Mayo Clinic

3) Monday, January 28th:
Jianming Liang, PhD
Siemens Medical Solutions

Announcements IV: December 19, 2007

Cystic Fibrosis Fundraiser Walk: April 27, 2008
Stanford Athletics Announces Free Admission Policy: All but seven sports are now free to fans, students, and the public.

Cystic Fibrosis Fundraiser Walk: Sunday, April 27, 2008, at 9:30 AM at the Stanford Dean's Lawn. The 2008 national fund-raising goal of the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation is to raise $40 million. Come be a part of their fundraiser by registering at http://www.cff.org/great_strides/find_a_walk_site/. For more information, please access http://www.cff.org/great%5Fstrides/.


Stanford Athletics Announces Free Admission Policy: All but seven sports are now free to fans, students, and the public. Bob Bowlsby, director of Stanford Athletics, announced at the end of October 2007 that free admission will be provided to all previously ticketed regular season athletic events (that are not special events, post-season, or NCAA championships), with the exception of football, men's and women's basketball, women's volleyball, baseball, and men's and women's soccer. Stanford Athletics will also continue to charge an admission fee for the Stanford Invitational Track Meet on April 4-5, 2008. All other previously ticketed athletic events will be free such as men's volleyball, men's and women's gymnastics, men's and women's water polo, lacrosse, men's and women's tennis, softball, men's and women's swimming and diving, synchronized swimming, wrestling, and men's and women's track and field (with the exception of the Stanford Invitational). Sports that have not had an admission fee in the past will remain free; this includes men's and women's golf, men's and women's rowing, field hockey, fencing, squash, and sailing. For more information, please access http://gostanford.cstv.com/genrel/103107aaa.html.

Announcements III: December 17, 2007

Stanford Health Improvement Program: Register online for the winter quarter 2008 at http://hip.stanford.edu/classes/register.html beginning, Wednesday, December 5, 2007, for classes beginning on Monday, January 7, 2008. You can use your STAP funds to pay for some of the classes. For a full description of courses and registration information, please see the "Health Improvement Program Quarterly Class Schedule" at http://stanfordhealthimprovement.org/hip/pdfschedules/hipWinter2008.indd.pdf.

Classes include the following:

CPR and First Aid;

Weight Management/Nutrition: "Behavior Change/Weight Management Program," "Eating for the Long Run," "Low Carbon Diet 'Lose 5000 lbs in a Month!,'" "Stress Eating (& Other Non-Hunger Eating)," and "Weight Watchers at Work";

Ergonomic/Posture Health: "Biofeedback for Workstation Analysis," "Mechanics of Heart, Breast, & Lung Health," and "Sitting Comfortably";

Midlife Wellness Series: "Sounder Sleep," "Midlife Wellness for Women," "Better Memory for Better Performance," "Aging--Joyfully, Healthfully, Passionately, & Wisely," "Healthy Bones for Life," "Healthy Eating for the Long Run," and "Midlife Crisis/Opportunity";

Environmental Health: "Low Carbon Diet 'Lose 5000 lbs in a Month!'";

Exercise/Physical Activity: "Stepping Out with Stanford On-Line Class," and "Walk for Wellness";

Mind/Body Health: "Breathe to Relax & Release," "Create the Body Your Soul Desires," "Intuition for Productivity, Innovation, & Wellness," and "Reiki Healing";

Stress Management: "The Art of Living," "Drumming Up Health," "Love Yourself for Everyone Else's Sake," "Mindfulness-Based Stress Management,"and "Stress Eating (& Other Non-Hunger Eating)";

Special Health Issues: "Down the Rabbit Hole: A Workshop in Action Theatre Improvisation";

Individual Behavior Change Options: "Health Behavior Consultations," "Smoking Cessation," and "Wellness Coaching";

Cardio: "Cardio Step & Strength," "Cardio Dance & Core Strength Fusion, Carnival Cardio Fiesta, Cardio/Chi/Conditioning, Cross Training," "Fantastic Abs & Cardio," and "Tap Dance for Fitness";

Healthy Back/Core Strength: "Healthy Back Cardio & Core Strength," "Healthy Back Cardio & Core Strength on Stability Ball," "Healthy Back Core Strength," and "Healthy Back/Strong Abdominals";

Pilates: "Pilates Essentials," "Pilates for Core Strength," and "Dynamic Yoga/Pilates Challenge";

Mind/Body Fitness: "Chen Style Tai Chi Old Form," and "Chen Family Taijiquan & Qigong Tai Chi for Arthritis,"

Mulit-Cultural Dance for Fitness: "Middle Eastern Belly Dance";

Strength & Body Sculpt: "Body Firm/Super Sculpt," "Hard Core Abs Express," "H.A.A.B.I.T.," and "Pure Abs: Core Strength";

Walk for Wellness: "Stanford Sightseeing Striders," and "Walk for Wellness";

Weight Training: "Orientation to Weight Room Equipment," "Circuit Weight Training," "Versa Circuit Weight Training," and "Lifetime Fitness Weight Training";

Yoga for Health: "Dynamic Yoga/Pilates Challenge," "Mid-Day Yoga: Relax & Renew," "Morning Mindful Yoga: Creating Union of Mind & Spirit," "Power Yoga," and "Yoga for Workplace Wellness";

Water Exercise: "Lap Swimming";

"Living Strong, Living Well (LSLW)," "Stepping Out with Stanford," and "Senior Fitness."

Announcements II: December 7, 2007

East Palo Alto Police Station Annual Toy Drive: Wednesday, Dec. 5th, until Tuesday, December 18th, from noon until 5:00 PM in the donation boxes located in Terman Room 291 in the Terman Engineering Building at 380 Panama Mall. Diantha Stensrud, administrative associate in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, is collecting unwrapped toys, books, games, and stuffed toy animals for the East Palo Alto Police Department starting Wednesday, Dec. 5th, until Tuesday, December 18th, from noon until 5:00 PM. Your donations will be distributed by Santa Claus at the East Palo Alto Police Station during their annual children's toy distribution on December 24th. If you have any questions, please contact Diantha Stensrud at 723-4447 or diantha.stensrud@stanford.edu.

Announcements I: December 7, 2007

Staff Meeting: Wednesday, December 12th, from 1:15 PM to 2:30 PM in Munzer Auditorium (http://cmgm.stanford.edu/munzer/location.html) at the Beckman Center. Gary Davis, business operations analyst in the Stanford Controller's Office, will be speaking on "Managing Your Money and Oracle Reporting" at our staff meeting. Mr. Davis will be joined by a colleague from his office and two representatives from the Office of Sponsored Research for a question and answer (Q & A) session after the presentation. The presentation and Q & A session will be informative for beginning and advanced users and an opportunity for staff who have never used Oracle to learn about how our financial systems are structured. Please find the agenda for Mr. Davis' presentation below. If you have questions, please contact Yun-Ting Yeh, assistant director of finance and administration, at 724-5566 (ytyeh@stanford.edu) or Deitria Chapman, HR and VP associate, at 725-9065 (deitria@stanford.edu). Thank you.

"Managing Your Money and Oracle Reporting" Agenda
Welcome
--Review Agenda and Handouts
--Expectations

Highlights from
A Guide to Managing Your Money

What PTAs are involved?
--REF_229_PTA_Listing
--REF_228_Proj_Task_with_Award
--REF_225_Fund_Authorization

How much do I have left?
--FUND_154_YTD_Fund_Bal_List
--FUND_153_Fund_Statement

How much did I spend?
--EXP_285_Mo_Detail_Statement
--EXP_279_Transaction_Detail
--EXP_149_Qrtly_Exp_Cert

Resources
--Financial Gateway
--ORA website
--Financial Reports website

Questions and Answers

Announcements I: November 2007

Stanford Radiology Department Blood Drive: Tuesday, November 13, 2007, and Tuesday, December 4, 2007

Aurora Forum at Stanford University 2007-08 Schedule: Monday, November 12, 2007-Saturday, May 24, 2008

Stanford University Flu Shot Clinics: Wednesdays, November 14 and 28, 2007, and December 5, 2007

Cantor Arts Center Exhibits at Stanford University: November 2007-October 2008


Stanford Radiology Department Blood Drive: Tuesday, November 13, 2007, and Tuesday, December 4, 2007, at the Stanford Blood Center at 780 Welch Road. The Radiology Department is hosting a blood drive, and all Radiology departmental members are invited to participate. This includes residents, fellows, faculty, and staff. If you have any questions regarding your eligibility to donate, please contact the Stanford Blood Center at 723-7831.

To give a blood donation, please contact the Stanford Blood Center to schedule an appointment for either Tuesday, November 13th, or Tuesday, December 4th. Please make sure you let the scheduler know that you are with the Radiology Department. All interested donors should also visit the web at http://bloodcenter.stanford.edu to check eligibility, pre-donation guidelines, etc. Please spread the word and encourage your colleagues to join you. Thank you very much.

Aurora Forum at Stanford University 2007-08 Schedule: Monday, November 12, 2007-Saturday, May 24, 2008. Continuing the history of free public programs that began with the University's founding in 1891, the Aurora Forum (http://www.auroraforum.org/) is hosting a series of public conversations centering on the theme of "Democratic Ideals." The following is a schedule of the free programs offered by the Aurora Program for 2007-08:

IRAQ: REFRAME; Monday, November 12, 2007, from 7:30 - 9:00 PM at Kresge Auditorium. This is the first of a five-part series with the Montalvo Arts Center.


Esalen: Education for Life on the Edge; Thursday, December 6, 2007, from 7:30-9:00 PM at Cubberley Auditorium.


IRAQ: REFRAME; Monday, December 17, 2007, from 7:30-9:00 PM at Kresge Auditorium. This is the second of a five-part series with the Montalvo Arts Center.


What Would Martin Say? An Evening with Clarence B. Jones; Thursday, January 17, 2008, from 7:30-9:00 PM.


IRAQ: REFRAME; Monday, January 28, 2008, from 7:30-9:00 PM (location TBD). This is the third of a five-part series with the Montalvo Arts Center.


IRAQ: REFRAME; Monday, February 4, 2008, from 7:30-9:00 PM at Kresge Auditorium. This is the fourth of a five-part series with the Montalvo Arts Center.


The Beatles on the Brain; Thursday, February 21, 2008, from 7:30-9:00 PM at Kresge Auditorium.


IRAQ: REFRAME; Monday, March 17, 2008, from 7:30-9:00 PM at the Montalvo Arts Center. This is the fifth of a five-part series with the Montalvo Arts Center.


CONFERENCE: Global Solidarity and the End of Poverty; Saturday, April 5, 2008, from 10:00 AM-5:00 PM at the Kresge Auditorium.


On the Pursuit of Happiness; Thursday, April 24, 2008, from 7:30-9:00 PM at Kresge Auditorium.


CONFERENCE: The Future of Social Hope; Saturday, May 24, 2008, from 10:00 AM-5:00 PM at Kresge Auditorium.

Stanford University Flu Shot Clinics: Wednesdays, November 7, 14, and 28, 2007, and December 5, 2007, from 3 to 6 PM at the Vaden Health Center at 866 Campus Drive East. The flu shot is free for University employees (faculty, staff, emeritus faculty, retired staff, as well as Medical School and research faculty and staff); a valid Stanford ID must be presented at the time of vaccination. Stanford Hospital and Clinics employees are not eligible for a free vaccination. The vaccine will not be given to individuals with a severe cold or other infection or who are allergic to eggs. Pregnant women in their first trimester must get medical clearance from an obstetrician.

The shot is $22 for spouses and domestic partners of university employees, as well as for students and their spouses or domestic partners. Students enrolled in Cardinal Care pay $11. Medical students must present their medical student ID card for a free shot. For more information, please go to http://vaden.stanford.edu/medical/index.html#FluClinic.

Cantor Arts Center Exhibits at Stanford University: November 2007-October 2008. The Cantor Arts Center offers free admission Wednesdays through Sundays from 11 AM to 5 PM and Thursdays, 11 AM to 8 PM. The following is a brief overview of their exhibits:

Anxious Objects: Willie Cole's Favorite Brands, October 3, 2007,-January 6, 2008, with free tours offered on Thursdays at 12:15 PM and Saturdays and Sundays at 2 PM. This exhibit features common household products transformed into art.

Dreaming of Speech without Words: The Paintings and Early Objects of H.C. Westermann, November 21, 2007-March 2, 2008.

Frederic Church, Winslow Homer, and Thomas Moran: Tourism and the American Landscape, January 30, 2008-May 4, 2008.

Masterworks from the New Orleans Museum of Art, June 4, 2008-October 5, 2008.

Announcement II: August 2007

The X-Ray Project @ Stanford School of Medicine: Tuesday, September 4, 2007, through Friday, September 14, 2007, from 7 AM to 7 PM in the Fairchild Auditorium (291 Campus Drive, Stanford University School of Medicine). Composed of actual X-rays and CT scans, the "Inside Terrorism: The X-Ray Project" is a photography exhibit that explores an important social issue of our time: the effects of terrorism on civilian populations worldwide. Many of our faculty were involved in helping with the project. For a complete list, please see the Stanford School of Medicine Honorary Committee list below.

EVENTS:
RECEPTION AND DISCUSSION WITH ARTIST DIANE COVERT
Tuesday, September 4, 5:30-7:30 PM
Fairchild Auditorium
Refreshments will be served

PEDIATRIC GRAND ROUNDS
"Young Victims of Violence: The Aftermath of Trauma on the Psychological Well-Being of Children"
Presented by Dr. Victor G. Carrion
Friday, September 7, 8:00 AM
Fairchild Audtitorium

REMEMBERING WORLDWIDE TERRORIST VICTIMS
Tuesday, September 11, 12:00 Noon
Fairchild Auditorium

All events are open to the public
For more information please contact Julie Bernstein, (415) 957-1551, jbernstein@jcrc.org

STANFORD SCHOOL OF MEDICINE HONORARY COMMITTEE:
Richard A. Barth, MD, Professor and Associate Chairman of Radiology, Stanford University School of Medicine; Radiologist-in-Chief, Lucile Packard Children's Hospital

Bernard Dannenberg, MD, Clinical Assistant Professor of Surgery-Emergency Medicine and Director of Pediatric Emergency Services, Stanford University Medical Center

Terry S. Desser, MD, Associate Professor of Radiology and Director of the Radiology Residency Program, Stanford University School of Medicine

Carl Feinstein, MD, Professor of Psychiatry and Director of Child and Adolescent
Psychiatry, LPCH at Stanford

Heidi M. Feldman, MD, PhD, Ballinger-Swindells Endowed Professor of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics, LPCH at Stanford

Chaplain Bruce Feldstein, MD, Director, Jewish Chaplaincy at Stanford University Medical Center and Adjunct Clinical Professor, Center for Education in Family and Community Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine

Gary M. Glazer, MD, Emma Pfeiffer Merner Professor in the Medical Sciences, Professor and Chairman of the Department of Radiology, Stanford University School of Medicine

Gary Glover, PhD, Professor of Radiology and Director of the Radiological Sciences Laboratory, Stanford University School of Medicine

Beverley Newman, MD, Associate Professor and Associate Chief of Pediatric Radiology, LPCH at Stanford

Bill Northway, MD, Emeritus Active Professor of Radiology and Pediatrics, LPCH at Stanford

Charles Prober, MD, Professor of Pediatrics, Microbiology & Immunology, and Senior Associate Dean for Medical Student Education, Stanford University School of Medicine

Hannah Valantine, MD, Professor of Medicine and Senior Associate Dean for Diversity and Leadership, Stanford University

CO-SPONSORS:
Stanford School of Medicine

Lane Medical Library

EdTech Services

Radiology Interest Group at Stanford

Stanford Medical Student Association

Jewish Medical Student Association

Jewish Community Relations Council of San Francisco, the Peninsula, Marin, Sonoma, Alameda, and Contra Costa Counties

The David Project

Stand with Us

Israel Peace Initiative

PLANNING COMMITTEE:
Matthew Goldstein, MD Candidate

Rebecca Rakow-Penner, MD/PhD Candidate

Elizabeth Zambricki, MD Candidate

Dr. Beverley Newman

Barbara Schapira

Julie Bernstein


SPECIAL THANKS TO:
Mary Ayers
Mitzi Baker
Paul Costello
Rev. C. George Fitzgerald
Rabbi Dov Greenberg
Heidi Heilemann, MLS
Kim Schwartz


Announcements I: August 2007

ClickHome Seminar, "The Five Essentials You Need to Know before Buying or Selling in Today's Changing Market!": Tuesday, August 28, 2007

17th Annual Susan G. Komen San Francisco Race for the Cure: Sunday, September 23, 2007

ClickHome Seminar, "The Five Essentials You Need to Know before Buying or Selling in Today's Changing Market!": Tuesday, August 28, 2007 in the Munzer Auditorium from 12:00 PM to 1:00 PM. To make home buying more affordable for employees, Stanford University School of Medicine has formed a partnership with ClickHome. On August 28th, ClickHome representatives will be on the Stanford campus to talk to Stanford employees about the changing home market and to answer questions about the savings benefits available to Stanford employees. Please RSVP to Erin Prescott at (408) 200-4818 or eprescott@clickhomerealty.com by Monday, August 27, 2007.

17th Annual Susan G. Komen San Francisco Race for the Cure: Sunday, September 23, 2007 from 7:30 AM to 1:00 PM beginning near the Ferry Building in San Francisco. Sponsored by the Stanford Cancer Center/Northern California Cancer Center, this 5K Run/Walk or one-mile Fun Walk will raise funds and awareness for the fight against breast cancer while celebrating breast cancer survivorship and honoring those who have lost their battle with the disease. The Susan G. Komen national organization provides enormous financial support for breast cancer research, novel clinical trials, and the training of future breast cancer specialists through a dedicated fellowship program at many cancer centers around the U.S., including Stanford. The national organization is closely linked with the San Francisco affiliate office, which provides support services for numerous organizations in the greater Bay Area region such as Meals on Wheels, free mammograms for low income women, and the Community Breast Health Project in Palo Alto.

Come join our Stanford Cancer Center Team for the Race for the Cure! You can join our team and see our team roster by accessing http://race.sfkomen.org/site/TR/Race/General?team_id=3610&pg=team&fr_id=1010. Anyone can participate on our team; patients, nurses, staff, family, friends, laboratory and clinical researchers, and physicians are all welcome. Join our team and receive a Stanford Team t-shirt and, if enough people join, round-trip transportation! For more information related to Stanford's participation in the event, please contact:

Elizabeth Crown
Director of Communications
Stanford Comprehensive Cancer Center
800 Welch Road
Palo Alto, CA 94305
(650) 736-2232
ecrown@stanford.edu

You can also register on your own at http://www.sfkomen.org/.

Race Day Schedule
Sunday, September 23, 2007

--7:30 AM-8:30 AM
Race Day Registration, T-Shirt, & Timing Chip Pick-Up

--9:00 AM
5K Timed Runners Start

--9:15 AM
5K Walk & 1 Mile Fun Walk Start (NEW ROUTE FOR THE 1 MILE FUN WALK!)

--10:15 AM
Survivor Celebration & Tribute
Survivor Group Photo

--10:30 AM
Awards Ceremony

--8:30 AM-1:00 PM
Health & Fitness Expo--Justin Hermann Plaza

For more race day details, please see http://www.sfkomen.org/r_raceday.html.

Announcements I: July 2007

Stanford Blood Center: Give Blood for Life!: Summer 2007 Promotions
Understanding and Applying Cultural Sensitivity in the Workplace: Tuesday, July 17, 2007, from 9:00 AM to 4:00 PM
2007 Making Strides Against Breast Cancer 5 Mile Walk: Saturday, October 20, 2007, 7:00 AM registration


Stanford Blood Center: Give Blood for Life!: Summer 2007 Promotions
The Stanford Blood Center has many special summer promotions listed below. To request a blood donation appointment, please call 650-723-7831; or toll free at 888-723-7831; or visit their website at http://bloodcenter.stanford.edu. After making an appointment, please visit any of the following three locations to donate blood:

Stanford Blood Center--Palo Alto
780 Welch Road, Suite #100
Palo Alto, CA 94304

Stanford Blood Center--Mountain View
515 South Drive, Suite #20
Mountain View, CA 94040

Stanford Blood Center--Hillview
3373 Hillview Avenue
Palo Alto, CA 94304
(Center Opened September 16)

Donor Buddy Days--Double Donors are Twice as Nice!
All Center Locations
July and August
Bring in a donor new to the Stanford Blood Center and you'll both receive a voucher for a pint of Baskin Robbins ice cream! Then you can hit the beach and "Baskin" the sun, knowing you've done your good deed for the summer. To get in on this sweet deal, click this link (http://bloodcenter.stanford.edu/news/PDFs/DonorBuddyCoupon.pdf) and print out the coupon, or just print out this section of this e-mail.weets for the sweet!

Oakland A's v. LA Angels of Anaheim
Win Two Field-Level Tickets!
All Center Locations
Wednesday, July 18, 2007
On Friday, August 3, at 7:05 PM at McAfee Coliseum, the Oakland A's will take on the LA Angels of Anaheim. Will Athletic's pitcher Dan Haren and Halo John Lackey compete from the mound? Can Jack Cust hit one out of the park that sends the Angels floating back down the coast without a win? YOU MAY FIND OUT! Donate at one of our Center locations on Wednesday, July 18, and fill out a prize-drawing slip. The winner will receive a pair of field-level tickets and will be notified by Friday, July 20.

Monday Movie Madness PLUS!--Movie Ticket, Popcorn, Drink!
Hillview Center Only
Mondays between 7:30 AM to Noon
Our Hillview Center needs your help on Monday mornings. Donors will not only receive a free AMC movie ticket, but we'll take care of your small popcorn and small fountain drink as well. Let Stanford Blood Center take you to the movies!

Grateful Life Tour III--Tie-Dye T-shirts!
All Center Locations
What a long, strange trip it's been! This is our third year of the Grateful Life tie-dye T-shirt Tour, and it picks up steam every year. Each donor visiting one of our donation centers on the tour dates of July 2, 3, and 5 (and subsequent Fridays, Saturdays, and Mondays in July) will receive a tie-dye shirt.

O What a Party!
Hillview Center Only
Thursday, August 16, 2007, 7:30 AM to 7:30 PM
Enjoy a day of saving lives and be rewarded with fabulous fun, food, and prizes! Donors receive a collectible O Party T-shirt! Keep your eye on our web site for details as the summer starts to sizzle. . . .

Understanding and Applying Cultural Sensitivity in the Workplace: Tuesday, July 17, 2007 from 9:00 AM to 4:00 PM at the Bechtel International Center Dining Room. The Help Center (http://www.stanford.edu/dept/helpcenter) will be holding free all-day workshops for faculty and staff designed to increase awareness and sensitivity to various multicultural communication styles while enhancing and learning new communication styles and techniques for addressing diversity. Mary Foston-English, MFT, and Sean O'Riordan, PhD, will be presenting at the workshop. To register, please call (650) 723-4577 or email helpcenter@lists.stanford.edu.

2007 Making Strides Against Breast Cancer 5 Mile Walk: Saturday, October 20, 2007, 7:00 AM registration in Golden Gate Park, San Francisco, California. There is no registration fee or minimum amount to fundraise in order to participate in this fun, noncompetitive five mile walk to heighten awareness of breast cancer. Registration begins at 7:00 AM with a rolling walk beginning from 8:00 AM to 10:00 AM and special 10th anniversary ribbon cutting ceremony at 9:00 AM. You can participate as a walker, volunteer, team leader, or team member. Teams help raise money for research, education, advocacy, and patient services by gathering pledges. For more information, please visit http://makingstrides.acsevents.org/bayarea). There are also two kick-off breakfasts held during the summer in San Francisco and San Jose on August 16 and August 9, respectively. The breakfasts are from 8:00 AM to 9:00 AM at the San Francisco Marriott Hotel and the San Jose Doubletree Hotel. Please contact Jantz Malbrue at Jantz.Malbrue@cancer.org or 510 452-5229 x350 for more information about the breakfasts.

Announcements II: June 2007

Stanford Association of Research Professionals (SARP) Kickoff Meeting: Tuesday, June 12, 2007
Chelsea vs Club America (professional soccer): Saturday, July 14, 2007


Stanford Association of Research Professionals (SARP) Kickoff Meeting: Tuesday, June 12, 2007, from 12:00 to 1:30 PM at Fairchild Auditorium. On Tuesday, the SARP will initiate its first working group of professionals providing a forum for communication, education, and networking to achieve excellence in clinical research. Come see what SARP is all about! To preregister, please go to http://reggie.stanford.edu/signup.asp?1568. You can also join the SARP member e-mail distribution list at: sarp-members@lists.stanford.edu. Light refreshments will be served.

Chelsea vs Club America (professional soccer): Saturday, July 14, 2007, at 6 PM at the Stanford Stadium. On July 14, the 3-time English league champions Chelsea Football Club (http://www.chelseafc.com) and the 10-time Mexican Primera League champions Club America (http://www.clubamerica.com.mx) will play a friendly match for the Disney Friendship Club as part of Chelsea's fourth consecutive preseason tour in the United States. This is the first time two world-class soccer teams have played in the new Stanford Stadium. The Chelsea Football Club is part of the English Premier League and has won the league title in 2006, 2005, and 1955 since their founding in 1905. Established in 1916, Club America holds ten league titles in Mexico's Primera Division. To buy your tickets, please call the Stanford Athletics ticket office at 1-866-818-0968; visit the Stanford Athletic ticket office at Stanford Stadium Gate 2 (Hours: Mon.-Fri., 9 AM-4 PM PDT); or visit http://www.gostanford.com.

Announcements I: June 2007

Radiology Departmental Finance Drop-In Session: Thursday, June 28, 2007
St. Lawrence String Quartet Chamber Music Free Noon Concert Series: Monday, June 25; Wednesday, June 27; and Friday, June 29, 2007
July 3rd Celebration with Big Bad VooDoo Daddy & Fireworks: Tuesday, July 3, 2007

Radiology Departmental Finance Drop-In Session: Thursday, June 28, 2007, from 2:00 to 3:00 PM in Grant S-084. The finance group holds a monthly finance session, typically on the last Thursday of each month. This session is for anyone who may have questions regarding expenditure statements and other finance questions. If you would like more information, please contact Yun-Ting Yeh at ytyeh@stanford.edu.

St. Lawrence String Quartet Chamber Music Free Noon Concert Series: Monday, June 25; Wednesday, June 27; and Friday, June 29, 2007, beginning at 12:15 until approximately 1:15 PM. The Grammy-nominated St. Lawrence String Quartet will be offering free noon concerts at the Dinkelspiel Auditorium. For more information, please contact Barbara Greenwood at bgreenwood@stanford.edu.

Announcements II: May 2007

Guide to NIH K Awards Training Workshop: May 30, 2007
Cardinal Walk /All Campus Walk: May 31, 2007
July 3rd Celebration with Big Bad VooDoo Daddy & Fireworks: July 3, 2007


Cardinal Walk /All Campus Walk (1.5 Miles): Thursday, May 31, 2007, at Roble Field, Santa Teresa Street, 12:05 PM to 1:00 PM. The festivities will begin at 11:30 AM in Roble Field; the first 2,000 walkers will receive free pedometers. There will also be free music and refreshments. At 12:00 PM, the Provost will give a welcome speech to all participants; the walk will begin at 12:05 PM and end at 1:00 PM. Participants will walk a 1.5 mile loop in Roble Field. For more information, please visit http://steppingout.stanford.edu/cardinalwalk/.

Guide to NIH K Awards Training Workshop: Wednesday, May 30, 2007, at Fairchild Auditorium, Stanford University Medical Center, 9:00 AM to 12:00 PM. Stephen J. Korn, PhD, director of Training and Career Development, will provide an summary of the eligibility criteria for various NIH K Awards; the evaluation process; and the best practices for application development. There will also be a panel of K award recipients composed of mentors and proteges who will share their strategies for success. The topics covered will be as follows: "NIH K Series Eligibility Criteria & Application Process"; "How to Decide Which K Award is Right for Me" (Demonstrate NIH kiosk & offer guide to kiosk use); "NIH Proposal Evaluation Criteria, Process, Success Rates, & Scoring"; "Award Portability & Characteristics"; and "Career Options for Recipients & Mentoring" (Panel of Postdocs & Mentors). The sign in is from 8:15 AM to 9:00 AM at Fairchild Auditorium, and the workshop will begin at 9:00 AM and continue until 12:00 PM. Boxed lunches will be provided. There is no fee. Although registration is currently full, you can register for the waiting list at http://reggie.stanford.edu/NoAvailableSeats.asp?1564. Over fifty people from the waiting list will be allowed to attend the training workshop as "no seat" admissions. For more information, please contact Terri Hankes, program support coordinator, at thanks@stanford.edu or (650) 736-0129 and visit the website at http://postdocs.stanford.edu/events/guide_to_NIH_K_awards.html.

Announcements I: May 2007

Wellness Fair: May 9, 2007
Stanford Baseball: Faculty and Staff Free on Fridays: May 11, 2007
Stanford Spring Faire: May 11, 12, and 13, 2007
Stanford Graduate Summer Institute (SGSI): Deadline to register is May 18, 2007
Multicultural Springfest: May 24, 2007
July 3rd Celebration with Big Bad Voodoo Daddy & Fireworks: July 3, 2007

Stanford Graduate Summer Institute (SGSI): Register by May 18, 2007 (http://sgsi.stanford.edu/). To encourage interdisciplinary thinking, the Office of the Vice Provost for Graduate Education has developed the Stanford Graduate Summer Institute (SGSI), which offers courses taught by Stanford faculty and outside experts from a wide variety of disciplines. All six classes offered by the SGSI are non-credit bearing and are open to currently registered Stanford graduate students and postdoctoral researchers who will be continuing in the fall quarter of 2007. Most courses are free of charge and are taught in intensive, all-day workshops. For more information and/or to access the online application before the May 18th deadline, please go to http://sgsi.stanford.edu/.

The following is a brief description of the courses from the website http://sgsi.stanford.edu/:

1) Summer Institute for Entrepreneurship
Monday, June 18, to Friday, July 13, 2007
Apply online. Application deadline: May 18, 2007
Discover what it takes to develop an idea into a successful venture through an intensive four-week business management program for graduate students in non-business fields. There is a $600 registration fee and a $40 application fee for this course.

2) Virus!
Monday, September 10, to Friday, September 21, 2007
Apply online. Application deadline: May 18, 2007
Course size limit: 16
No fee
A global approach to a global threat: predicting, preventing, and responding to emerging infectious diseases using avian flu as a paradigm (Professor John Boothrooyd). Contact Bonda Lewis, llewys@stanford.edu, for more information.

3) The d.school Experience: Adventures in Design Thinking
Sunday, September 16, to Friday, September 21, 2007
Apply online. Application deadline: May 18, 2007
Adventures in Design Thinking is an experiential workshop offered to all Stanford graduate students through the Stanford Graduate Summer Institute and the d.school, which is officially known as the Hasso Plattner Institute of Design at Stanford (Professors Liz Gerber, Bernie Roth, and Terry Winograd).

4) Music and Human Behavior: A Multidisciplinary Investigation
Sunday, September 16, to Friday, September 21, 2007
Apply online. Application deadline: May 18, 2007
Music is a curiously pervasive human behavior. This course will look at music listening and music performance from cognitive and neuroscience perspectives (Professors Jonathan Berger, Vinod Menon, the St. Lawrence String Quartet, and friends).

5) Managing Groups and Teams
Monday, September 10, to Friday, September 14, 2007
9 AM to 12 PM, M-F
Apply online. Application deadline: May 18, 2007
Managing Groups and Teams is a short course on the theory and practice of making teams work. It has two primary goals: first, to provide a conceptual framework for understanding group dynamics and their effects on team performance, and second, to provide opportunities to reflect on and develop your ability to build and manage effective groups and teams (Professors Deborah Gruenfeld and Dale Miller).

6) Global Warming: Good Science or Bad Politics?
Sunday, September 16, to Friday, September 21, 2007
Apply online. Application deadline: May 18, 2007
The class will begin with a fast tutorial of the physical and biological scientific basis for concerns about global warming, as well as the contours of the debate among economists, sociologists, ethicists, ecologists, business, and environmental stakeholders and policy makers (Professors Stephen Schneider and Terry Root).

July 3rd Celebration with Big Bad Voodoo Daddy & Fireworks: Tuesday, July 3, 2007, 7:30 PM (gates open at 5:30 PM) at the Frost Amphitheater, Stanford University. The Grammy-nominated swing band Big Bad Voodoo Daddy will be playing at the annual pre-Independence Day concert, which will culminate in a fireworks display. Tickets are $44, but youth 15 and under are half price. There is also special pricing for students and Stanford faculty and staff. For more information, please visit http://livelyarts.stanford.edu/event.php?code=JUL3.

Anouncements III: April 2007

Stanford Baseball--Faculty and Staff Free on Fridays: April 27, and May 11, 2007
Wellness Fair: May 9, 2007
Multicultural Springfest: May 24, 2007


Stanford Baseball: Friday, April 27, and Friday, May 11, 2007, 6 PM at Sunken Diamond, located between the Avery Aquatic Center and Maloney Field, off of Nelson Road. With a valid Stanford University ID, all faculty and staff will receive free admission to the home baseball games on Friday nights during the regular season (with the exception of the game on May 18 vs. Pacific). There are two Friday-night home games left: the game on April 27 vs. Oregon State at 6 PM and the game on May 11 vs. Washington at 6 PM. For more information on Stanford Baseball, please see http://gostanford.cstv.com/sports/m-basebl/stan-m-basebl-body.html.

Wellness Fair: Wednesday, May 9, 2007, 10 AM to 3 PM at the Arrillaga Center for Sports and Recreation on campus (http://news-service.stanford.edu/news/2007/april18/wellness-041807.html). In partnership with the Department of Athletics, Physical Education, Recreation & Wellness, the Benefits Department is hosting a Wellness Fair on May 9, 2007, from 10 AM to 3 PM to help University employees develop healthier lifestyles.

Personal trainers will be working with participants to assess their fitness levels, and participants can have their blood pressure, body fat, bone density, strength, and flexibility measured. Those who would like their cholesterol levels measured must schedule an appointment in advance by going to http://www.wellcall.com/ (first-time users will need to register and use the password "stanford" in lowercase). The Stanford Blood Mobile will be there for those who would like to donate blood. To do so, please schedule an appointment in advance at http://membersforlife.org/stanford/mobilesch/search.php (find "Stanford," then "May 9," and follow the instructions).

Health-care vendors will also be discussing the Stanford-sponsored rewards program offered by all health plans except Kaiser. By participating in a wellness or exercise program offered by their health plan, participants can receive a monetary reward (for more information, please see http://benefitsu.stanford.edu/medical/medical/wellness.html).

The Wellness Fair will offer participants additional opportunities to

--enjoy healthy-cooking demonstrations;

--try out cardio equipment such as stationary bikes, elliptical trainers, and rowing machines;

--get bike safety checks;

--receive giveaways and enter drawings for larger prizes;

--and observe Pilates, fencing, rock climbing, self-defense, and yoga class demonstrations.

Multicultural Springfest: May 24, 2007, 11:00 AM to 1:30 PM at the Frost Amphitheater on campus (http://www.stanford.edu/dept/diversityaccess/springfest.html). The Multicultural Springfest is a celebration of our staff and its diversity, sponsored by the Diversity & Access Office; Human Resources Services; the Office of the President & Provost; and various Stanford Staff Groups. The 2007 Springfest will feature entertainment, art displays, free food, t-shirts, and raffle prizes. Volunteers are needed to exhibit their art; greet people; pass out programs; distribute t-shirts; collect raffle tickets; and assist the entertainers/artists. To volunteer, please go to http://www.stanford.edu/dept/diversityaccess/volunteerform.html. For more information or for disability related accommodations, please call (650) 725-0326 or email disability.access@stanford.edu.

Announcements II: April 2007

Dana Foundation Funding Opportunity: May 1, 2007
Stanford Spring Faire: May 11, 12, and 13, 2007

Funding Opportunity from the Dana Foundation: Using Brain and Immune Imaging Innovations to Improve Human Health: Internal Deadline: Tuesday, May 1, 2007

The research program at the Dana Foundation focuses on improving human brain and immune system functioning in health and disease and supports the pilot-testing of promising but high-risk innovative ideas that have direct clinical application. Following an internal selection process, two projects will be selected, one for each of two tracks identified by the Dana Foundation: 1) Track A: brain anatomical imaging or physiological function and 2) Track B: cellular and molecular imaging of brain cells or immune cells. Please note the internal deadline is Tuesday, May 1, 2007. For complete information on the eligibility requirements, funding amounts, and submission process, please see http://med.stanford.edu/rmg/funding/dana.html. For previously funded projects, please see http://www.dana.org/grants/health.

Stanford Spring Faire: Friday, Saturday, and Sunday, May 11, 12, and 13, 2007

The annual Stanford Spring Faire will feature over 100 artisans who will be exhibiting and selling their work during Mother's Day weekend. This fine arts and crafts faire is free and open to the public. The Stanford Spring Faire is the sole source of funding for the Bridge Peer Counseling Center, which has put on the Stanford Spring Faire since 1970. Please come out and support them!

Announcements I: April 2007

Stanford's Fifth Community Day: April 15, 2007
Administrative Professionals' Day: April 25, 2007
Take Our Daughters and Sons to Work Day: April 26, 2007
Radiology Staff Retreat: May 7, 2007

Stanford's Fifth Community Day: Sunday, April 15, 2007, 10 AM to 4 PM on the Stanford campus. Community Day is designed to be a free open house, featuring student cultural exhibits and musical performances, science and technology demonstrations, children's activities, tours of Jasper Ridge Biological Preserve and the Stanford Barn, sports and athletic demonstrations and a health fair. Two members of the Stanford Comprehensive Cancer Center will give lectures; Dr. Geoffrey Gurtner, associate professor of plastic and reconstructive surgery, will speak on the latest in pediatric stem cell medicine, and Dr. Daniel Bernstein, professor of pediatric cardiology, will discuss the latest in pediatric heart health. For a complete schedule, please see http:communityday.stanford.edu.

Come Celebrate Administrative Professionals' Day: Wednesday, April 25, 2007, 8 AM to 12 noon at the Frances C. Arrillaga Alumni Center. In honor of this national holiday, Training and Organizational Development, Human Resources, is sponsoring its annual conference for administrative staff (A1-A5) to demonstrate the University's appreciation of you and to provide you with opportunities for your professional development. Please join us for breakfast, opening remarks from Diane Peck, Executive Director of HR, a fun networking activity to get you acquainted with new and old colleagues, and more. There will be give-aways for every attendee as well as a raffle prize drawing at the end of the event. Various departments on campus, including HIP, the Work/Life Office, and Campus Dining, will display booths to inform you of their latest services and resources. You will also have a choice of attending one of three workshops, for which you must pre-register. For more details and registration, please go to: https://hrweb.stanford.edu/training/AADP/conference.html in early March. The program manager is Jackie Ward.

Take Our Daughters and Sons to Work Day: Thursday, April 26, 2007 from 7:45 AM to 12:15 PM
Who: Girls and Boys, 10-15 years of age
What: A day of exploring possibilities
Where: Workshops are all over campus and registration begins at Dinkelspiel Auditorium

This year's theme is "Revolutionizing the Workplace." Look for more information and registration materials on the University Benefits Work/Life website (http://worklife.stanford.edu) during the last week of March. The program coordinator is Carol Skladany.


Radiology Staff Retreat: Monday, May 7, 2007
We are currently planning a Radiology Staff Retreat for May 7, 2007 at the Frances C. Arrillaga Alumni Center on campus at 326 Galvez Street! The retreat will be an all day event; breakfast and lunch will be provided. The goals of the day are team-building activities and lots of fun. We have a fabulous retreat planning committee that includes the following staff members: Deitria Chapman; Gale Evans; Kari Guy; Rita Hernandez; Joe Hubbard; Andrew Kloak; Teresa Newton; Lanzie Rivera; Julie Ruiz; Kathleen Sexton, Training & Organizational Development Specialist; Maureen Wong; and Irina Worthey. Our committee was designed to be representative of the greater whole and is doing the best possible job to make this an enjoyable and relaxing, yet productive, event for all staff. Come prepared for a day of fun and comradery; it will be a blast! You are invited to contact any committee member if you wish to provide input or voice any concerns.

Parking_LotA.jpgMedical School Office Building (MSOB) and the Center for Clinical Services Research (CCSR) Parking Lot Closures
This spring, Parking and Transportation Services will be closing parking lots located near MSOB and CCSR in stages. These closures will begin April 30 with the partial reduction of parking lot #16, which is the MSOB lot closest to Welch Road. The larger parking lot that extends from CCSR to the Clark Center will probably remain open for another six months and will then be closed in phases until the completion of construction. To compensate for the closure of these parking lots, "A" parking will be increased in the Stockfarm Parking Structure #5 as well as in lots #17 and #18, which are bounded by Campus Drive, Welch Road, Oak Road, and Stockfarm Road. "C" permit parking will not be increased.


Faculty Announcements: February 2007

Building Assessment Team (BAT) Trainings: Tuesday and Wednesday, March 13 & 14
On March 14th in the Oak Lounge of Tresidder Memorial Union, Stanford will be conducting refresher training for all currently certified Building Assessment Team (BAT) members. There are two refresher sessions to choose from on the 14th. The first session starts at 8:00 AM and is now wait list only; the second session starts at 10:45 AM and is almost full. All registration for this training will be handled online. To register for BAT training, please go to http://ehs.stanford.edu and click on the link for 2007 Building Assessment Team Registration.

BAT members are a group of reasonably trained volunteers who will be taught how to conduct preliminary inspections on a "triage" basis in the event of an earthquake. BATs make a major contribution in the aftermath of an earthquake by identifying the buildings that most need to be inspected by a group of highly trained experts. If you are not currently a BAT member and would be interested in becoming a BAT, new BAT training will be conducted on March 13th starting at 8:00 AM in the Oak Lounge of Tresidder Memorial Union. If you have questions about this training, please contact Kathlyn Miller at kathlynm@stanford.edu.

Financial Fair: Saturday, March 24, 2007 from 9 AM to 3 PM
The School of Medicine has been invited to participate in a one-day Financial Fair, a program designed to help you learn more about investing, finances, retirement, and planning for a more secure financial future. Spend one day learning about how to reach your financial goals, so the rest of your days can be more rewarding!

The BenefitSU office has scheduled this one day Financial Fair (or "Super Saturday--Day 1") for Saturday, March 24, 2007, from 9:00 AM to 3:00 PM at the Stanford Linear Accelerator (SLAC) located at 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA. To attend a workshop, you need to register in STARS (http://axess.stanford.edu). For step-by-step instructions on how to register in STARS, please see the following flyer (Download file). In addition to the workshops, a keynote speaker and representatives from Fidelity, Vanguard, TIAA-CREF, Stanford Credit Union, and BenefitSU will attend as well. A flyer outlining the planned activities and workshops for the day (Download file) as well as profiles of the speakers, Keith Dorney (Download file) and Bill Oakes (Download file), are also available. There will also be prizes and giveaways! Spouses/partners are also welcome. We hope you will be able to participate in this event. If you have any questions, please contact the Human Resources Group at (650) 725-8607.

Take Our Daughters and Sons to Work Day: Thursday, April 26, 2007 from 7:45 AM to 12:15 PM
Who: Girls and Boys, 10-15 years of age
What: A day of exploring possibilities
Where: Workshops are all over campus and registration begins at Dinkelspiel Auditorium
This year's theme is "Revolutionizing the Workplace." Look for more information and registration materials on the University Benefits Work/Life website (http://worklife.stanford.edu) during the last week of March. The program coordinator is Carol Skladany.

Parking_LotA.jpgMedical School Office Building (MSOB) and the Center for Clinical Services Research (CCSR) Parking Lot Closures
This spring, Parking and Transportation Services will be closing parking lots located near MSOB and CCSR in stages. These closures will probably begin in April with parking lot #16, which is the MSOB lot closest to Welch Road. The larger parking lot that extends from CCSR to the Clark Center will probably remain open for another six months and will then be closed in phases until the completion of construction. To compensate for the closure of these parking lots, "A" parking will be increased in the Stockfarm Parking Structure #5 as well as in lots #17 and #18, which are bounded by Campus Drive, Welch Road, Oak Road, and Stockfarm Road. "C" permit parking will not be increased.

Radiology Staff Retreat: Monday, May 7, 2007
We are currently planning a Radiology Staff Retreat for May 7, 2007 at the Frances C. Arrillaga Alumni Center on campus at 326 Galvez Street! The retreat will be an all day event; breakfast and lunch will be provided. The goals of the day are team-building activities and lots of fun. We have a fabulous retreat planning committee that includes the following staff members: Deitria Chapman; Gale Evans; Kari Guy; Rita Hernandez; Joe Hubbard; Andrew Kloak; Teresa Newton; Lanzie Rivera; Julie Ruiz; Kathleen Sexton, Training & Organizational Development Specialist; Maureen Wong; and Irina Worthey. Our committee was designed to be representative of the greater whole and is doing the best possible job to make this an enjoyable and relaxing, yet productive, event for all staff. Come prepared for a day of fun and comradery; it will be a blast! You are invited to contact any committee member if you wish to provide input or voice any concerns.

Staff Announcements: February 2007

Staff Meeting: Monday, February 26
Financial Fair: Saturday, March 24, 2007 from 9 AM to 3 PM
Administrative Professionals' Day: April 25, 2007
Take Our Daughters and Sons to Work Day: April 26, 2007
Radiology Staff Retreat: May 7, 2007

Staff Meeting: Monday, February 26, 2007 from 2:00 PM to 3:00 PM at the Clark Center: Dr. Glazer will present his annual "State of the Department" to all staff at a special meeting on Monday, February 26, 2007 from 2:00 PM to 3:00 PM at the Clark Center, room S360 (upstairs). Dr. Glazer's presentation is for all Radiology staff including research assistants, scientific and technical staff, and research associates. All staff will receive a special gift from Dr. Glazer at the meeting. See you all there!

Building Assessment Team (BAT) Trainings: Tuesday and Wednesday, March 13 & 14
On March 14th in the Oak Lounge of Tresidder Memorial Union, Stanford will be conducting refresher training for all currently certified Building Assessment Team (BAT) members. There are two refresher sessions to choose from on the 14th. The first session starts at 8:00 AM and is now wait list only; the second session starts at 10:45 AM and is almost full. All registration for this training will be handled online. To register for BAT training, please go to http://ehs.stanford.edu and click on the link for 2007 Building Assessment Team Registration.

BAT members are a group of reasonably trained volunteers who will be taught how to conduct preliminary inspections on a "triage" basis in the event of an earthquake. BATs make a major contribution in the aftermath of an earthquake by identifying the buildings that most need to be inspected by a group of highly trained experts. If you are not currently a BAT member and would be interested in becoming a BAT, new BAT training will be conducted on March 13th starting at 8:00 AM in the Oak Lounge of Tresidder Memorial Union. If you have questions about this training, please contact Kathlyn Miller at kathlynm@stanford.edu.

Financial Fair: Saturday, March 24, 2007 from 9 AM to 3 PM
The School of Medicine has been invited to participate in a one-day Financial Fair, a program designed to help you learn more about investing, finances, retirement, and planning for a more secure financial future. Spend one day learning about how to reach your financial goals, so the rest of your days can be more rewarding!

The BenefitSU office has scheduled this one day Financial Fair (or "Super Saturday--Day 1") for Saturday, March 24, 2007, from 9:00 AM to 3:00 PM at the Stanford Linear Accelerator (SLAC) located at 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA. To attend a workshop, you need to register in STARS (http://axess.stanford.edu). For step-by-step instructions on how to register in STARS, please see the following flyer (Download file). In addition to the workshops, a keynote speaker and representatives from Fidelity, Vanguard, TIAA-CREF, Stanford Credit Union, and BenefitSU will attend as well. A flyer outlining the planned activities and workshops for the day (Download file) as well as profiles of the speakers, Keith Dorney (Download file) and Bill Oakes (Download file), are also available. There will also be prizes and giveaways! Spouses/partners are also welcome. We hope you will be able to participate in this event. If you have any questions, please contact the Human Resources Group at (650) 725-8607.

Come Celebrate Administrative Professionals' Day: Wednesday, April 25, 2007, 8 AM to 12 noon at the Frances C. Arrillaga Alumni Center. In honor of this national holiday, Training and Organizational Development, Human Resources, is sponsoring its annual conference for administrative staff (A1-A5) to demonstrate the University's appreciation of you and to provide you with opportunities for your professional development. Please join us for breakfast, opening remarks from Diane Peck, Executive Director of HR, a fun networking activity to get you acquainted with new and old colleagues, and more. There will be give-aways for every attendee as well as a raffle prize drawing at the end of the event. Various departments on campus, including HIP, the Work/Life Office, and Campus Dining, will display booths to inform you of their latest services and resources. You will also have a choice of attending one of three workshops, for which you must pre-register. For more details and registration, please go to: https://hrweb.stanford.edu/training/AADP/conference.html in early March. The program manager is Jackie Ward.

Take Our Daughters and Sons to Work Day: Thursday, April 26, 2007 from 7:45 AM to 12:15 PM
Who: Girls and Boys, 10-15 years of age
What: A day of exploring possibilities
Where: Workshops are all over campus and registration begins at Dinkelspiel Auditorium
This year's theme is "Revolutionizing the Workplace." Look for more information and registration materials on the University Benefits Work/Life website (http://worklife.stanford.edu) during the last week of March. The program coordinator is Carol Skladany.

Parking_LotA.jpgMedical School Office Building (MSOB) and the Center for Clinical Services Research (CCSR) Parking Lot Closures
This spring, Parking and Transportation Services will be closing parking lots located near MSOB and CCSR in stages. These closures will probably begin in April with parking lot #16, which is the MSOB lot closest to Welch Road. The larger parking lot that extends from CCSR to the Clark Center will probably remain open for another six months and will then be closed in phases until the completion of construction. To compensate for the closure of these parking lots, "A" parking will be increased in the Stockfarm Parking Structure #5 as well as in lots #17 and #18, which are bounded by Campus Drive, Welch Road, Oak Road, and Stockfarm Road. "C" permit parking will not be increased.

Radiology Staff Retreat: Monday, May 7, 2007
We are currently planning a Radiology Staff Retreat for May 7, 2007 at the Frances C. Arrillaga Alumni Center on campus at 326 Galvez Street! The retreat will be an all day event; breakfast and lunch will be provided. The goals of the day are team-building activities and lots of fun. We have a fabulous retreat planning committee that includes the following staff members: Deitria Chapman; Gale Evans; Kari Guy; Rita Hernandez; Joe Hubbard; Andrew Kloak; Teresa Newton; Lanzie Rivera; Julie Ruiz; Kathleen Sexton, Training & Organizational Development Specialist; Maureen Wong; and Irina Worthey. Our committee was designed to be representative of the greater whole and is doing the best possible job to make this an enjoyable and relaxing, yet productive, event for all staff. Come prepared for a day of fun and comradery; it will be a blast! You are invited to contact any committee member if you wish to provide input or voice any concerns.

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