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Department of Radiology

Awards and Honors

Dr. Gambhir Named Fellow of American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)

Photo of Sanjiv Sam GambhirPlease join us in congratulating Department Chair Dr. Sanjiv Sam Gambhir who has been named an American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Fellow. This honor is bestowed on AAAS members by their peers for meritorious efforts to advance science or its applications.

The accomplishments of the new Fellows will be celebrated at the 2015 AAAS Annual Meeting, convening this year under the theme "Innovations, Information, and Imaging." At the Annual Meeting, the new Fellows will be presented with an official certificate and a gold and blue (representing science and engineering, respectively) rosette pin on Saturday, 14 February from 8:00 a.m. to 10:00 a.m. at the AAAS Fellows Forum in San Jose, California.

Read the AAAS Announcement
Read the Stanford Announcement

Shannon Walters wins 2014 Aunt Minnie Award for Best Radiologic Technologist Educator

Screen Shot 2014-10-31 at 9.57.01 AM.pngStanford Radiology's Shannon Walters, co-manager of the 3DQ Lab has won the 2014 Aunt Minnie Award for Best Radiologic Technologist Educator. Congratulations Shannon!

Aunt Minnie's press release:
"Best Radiologic Technologist Educator
Winner: Shannon Walters, Stanford University

As one of the three co-managers of the 3D and Quantitative Imaging (3DQ) Lab at Stanford University, Shannon Walters is heavily involved in the training and education of technologists who are rotating through the facility.

Walters first became a radiologic technologist during a stint in the U.S. Army from 1997-2003, where he handled MRI duties at Walter Reed Army Medical Center, among other locations. Upon reentering civilian life, he became an MRI technologist at Stanford, left the university for a job as a 3D technologist in Michigan, and finally returned to Stanford, becoming co-manager of the lab 18 months ago.

Walters enjoys the fact that 3D technologists are on the cutting edge of technology, using high-tech methods to solve the clinical problems of the day, such as helping colleagues in the catheterization lab get C-arm angles faster.

Technologists working in the 3DQ lab at Stanford have slowly been expanding their responsibilities, taking over duties once performed by radiologists, such as vascular measurements.

"Technologists are able to take over knowledge and processes from the radiologist and do them in a reliable manner," he said. "We are right there, able to solve problems right now; we are able to do it ourselves."

Working in 3D is key to the expanding role of technologists in healthcare, Walters believes. While technologists performing CT and MRI scans are helping to answer specific clinical questions, such as by ruling out disease, 3D technologists are going a step further by helping to demonstrate the pathology in an image.

"I like the fact that we are on the edge of technology, and we are pushing it every single day," he said.

Dr. Larson Received RSNA Honored Educator Award

david-larson.jpgDavid Larson, MD has earned a 2014 RSNA Honored Educator Award. The RSNA Honored Educator Award is awarded to select individuals who have demonstrated their commitment to radiology education through the RSNA. The award serves as a benchmark of academic productivity in support of a meaningful and successful radiology career.

Congratulations, Dr. Larson!

2014 ARR Distinguished Investigators Award

Photo of Stanford Radiology Faculty named ARR 2014 Distinguished InvestigatorsThe Academy of Radiology Research is proud to announce Distinguished Investigators for 2014. This prestigious honor recognizes individuals for their accomplishments in the field of imaging research. Over the past few decades, the radiology research community has been responsible for many important advances that have had a profound impact on healthcare.

The Academy Induction Ceremony will take place at this year’s RSNA annual meeting in November. Congratulations to Stanford Radiology Faculty who are among those named as 2014 Distinguished Investigators!

(left to right):
Gary Glover, PhD (RSL)
Brian Hargreaves, PhD (RSL)
Norbert Pelc, PhD (RSL)
Joseph Wu, MD, PhD (MIPS)

Michael Federle, MD, recipient of 2014 Gold Medal for Distinguished Service by the American Roentgen Ray Society (ARRS)

Photo of Michael FederleDr. Michael Federle received the 2014 Gold Medal for Distinguished Service by the American Roentgen Ray Society (ARRS). The ARRS Gold Medal is the American Roentgen Ray Society’s highest honor awarded to recipients for distinguished service to radiology.

Dr. Federle earned his undergraduate degree in biology at Marquette University in Milwaukee, WI, and his MD at Georgetown University in Washington, DC. After completing his internship in internal medicine at the University of Cincinnati Hospital, he stayed on to complete a second residency in radiology. After completing his radiology residency, Dr. Federle began teaching at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF). He spent 10 years at UCSF where he served as chief of radiology, vice chair of radiology, section chief of CT body scanning and gastrointestinal radiology, and chief of the medical staff.

He left UCSF for the University of Pittsburgh where he was Professor of Radiology since 1989, serving as the Department Chairman from 1989 to 1992, as Director of Abdominal Imaging Center from 1992 to 2008, with a brief stint as Chief of Quality Process and Improvement just before leaving for Stanford.

Dr. Federle joined our Department in 2008 as Professor of Radiology. In our Department, he serves as the Associate Chair for Education, ensuring that we have the highest quality of medical education while overseeing the residency clerkship course, noon conferences, and other educational programs offered within the Department.

Dr. Federle is one of the most distinguished diagnostic radiologists in our faculty. He is the author of over 250 papers in peer-reviewed publications, 21 books in the field of abdominal imaging, including the definitive textbook in this area– Diagnostic Imaging – Abdomen. His manuscripts have been referenced more than 1,000 times in peer-reviewed publications. He has been the president of two leading societies related to abdominal imaging, the Society of Gastrointestinal Radiologists and the Society of Computed Body Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging. He has also received numerous awards from the most prestigious international societies for radiology and abdominal imaging, most recently receiving the Cannon Medal for Lifetime Achievement from the Society of Gastrointestinal Radiologists . He has also received numerous teaching awards at his previous institutions, University of Pittsburgh and UCSF, and at Stanford, when he was named the senior faculty teacher of the year in 2010. In 2007, the residents at the University of Pittsburgh created the Michael P. Federle Mentorship Award in his honor.

Michelle James Received First Prize at INMiND TSPO Symposium

Photo of Michelle JamesMichelle James, PhD, Instructor of Radiology and Neurology and Neurological Sciences has received the First Prize Poster and Abstract Award at the INMiND TSPO Symposium on Microglia Imaging and Biology in Manchester, United Kingdom on April 24-25, 2014, for her abstract entitled "GE180-PET detects reduced microglia activation after LM11A-31 therapy in a mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease".

Congratulations, Dr. James!

Dr Pelc Elected as AIMBE Director At-Large

Thumbnail image for Norbert PelcNorbert Pelc, PhD has been elected by his peers, leaders in the fields of medical and biological engineering, as the Director At-Large of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering (AIMBE) for 2014 - 2016. AIMBE’s mission is to recognize excellence in, and advocate for, the fields of medical and biological engineering in order to advance society.

Congratulations, Dr. Pelc!

Read the AIMBE Press Release

Dr Plevritis Elected to AIMBE College of Fellows

Photo of Sylvia PlevritisSylvia Plevritis, PhD has been elected by her peers, leaders in the fields of medical and biological engineering, to the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering (AIMBE) 2014 College of Fellows. She will be inducted during AIMBE's annual meeting in March.

Congratulations, Dr. Plevritis!

Dr McDougall Received the Light of Life Award

Photo of Ross McDougallRoss McDougall, MD has received the Light of Life Award from Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center where he gave a lecture entitled, "Differentiated Thyroid Cancer, Then and Now: Four Questions and a Quandary".

The Light of Life Award is an annual award presented to an esteemed physician in thyroid cancer research as selected by the Light of Life Foundation. Their mission is to improve the quality of life of thyroid cancer patients through continual education of the lay public and the medical community, and by promoting research and development to improve thyroid cancer care. The Light of Life Foundation Honorary Award has become recognized amongst the worldwide thyroid cancer medical community.

Congratulations, Dr. McDougall!

RSNA 2013 Molecular Imaging Travel Award Recipients

Congratulations to the following 2013 Radiology Society of North America Molecular Imaging Travel Award recipients:

aman-khurana.jpg
Aman Khurana, MD - "In Vivo Mesenchymal Stem Cell Labeling Using FDA Approved Iron Oxide: Ferumoxytol"

 

Photo of Ferdinand Knieling
Ferdinand Knieling - "Non-invasive Assessment of Inflammation in a Murine Model of Chronic Inflammatory Bowel Disease Using Ultrasound Molecular Imaging"

 

Photo of Steven Machtaler
Steven Machtaler, PhD - "Utilization of Ultrasound Molecular Imaging Targeted to Thy1(CD90) for the Detection of Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma in an Orthotopic Murine Xenograft Model"

 

Photo of Adam Shuhendler
Adam J. Shuhendler, PhD - "Building Nanoparticles from Small Molecules in Situ in Dying Tumor Tissue to Track Chemotherapy Response by MRI"

 

Fanny Chapelin Received France "Best Engineer of the Year" Award

Photo of Fanny ChapelinOut of a national selection among thousands of engineers, Fanny Chapelin, was awarded the France "Best Engineer of the Year" award, in the category of "science" organized by L'Usine Nouvelle and Industry & Technology. The purpose of this award is to promote engineering studies and show it's diversity in applications and to encourage future generations to pursue careers in science by recognizing great French scientists. The last round of selection was based on a five page dissertation about a project the engineer pursued in the past years and what impact it will have for people. Fanny's dissertation discussed a new in vivo stem cell labeling technique for tracking stem cells after transplantation that's ready for the clinics.

Brief description of the project:
"Our new method addresses an important bottleneck for safe clinical translation of novel stem cell therapies. Transplanted stem cells need to be tracked in vivo in order to ensure safe deposition and lack of tumor formation. However, previously applied labeling procedures of stem cells with contrast agents or radiotracers required stem cell manipulations between their harvest and transplantation, which poses risks of contaminations and biological alterations of the cells. We present a novel approach of "in vivo" stem cell labeling, which relies on a simple parenteral administration of an FDA-approved iron supplement 1-2 days before a planned harvest of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) from bone marrow. Our data show that the iron compound is taken up by MSC, is retained in MSC through harvesting and ex vivo expansion procedures and that it allows for sensitive in vivo stem cell tracking with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of "in vivo" stem cell labeling with an immediately clinically applicable iron supplement. This approach could be immediately translated to the clinic and could be widely utilized to track MSC transplants in various target organs of patients."

Fanny was the youngest ever nominated, the only woman nominated and the only award winning woman.

Congratulations, Fanny!

Read the L'Usine Nouvelle article
Read the Industry & Technology article
Read the Radiology paper
Read the Stanford Medicine article
Read the Stanford Scope article

VA Radiology Service Wins an Oscar!

Payam Masabam accepts Oscar Payam Masabam and VA Radiology Service
Please join us in congratulating our VA Radiology Service for winning the Oscar! This was no doubt due their VERY hard efforts and terrific team-work.

This was the inaugural year of Stanford VA Health Care System-wide awards and the “Academy Award” style of the annual Director's Town Hall meeting. One clinical and one administrative winner were chosen by the office of the Chief of Staff and Director. The administrative winner was the payroll section.

Congratulations on your Oscar for a job VERY well done!

2013 Department of Radiology Angel Funding Recipients

The Department of Radiology, the Angel Funding Review committee, and Dr. Sam Gambhir are pleased to announce this year’s winners of angel funding to advance their research and eventually apply for longer term funding. The novel projects funded include new partnerships within the Department, high risk projects, and first-in-man studies. Congratulations to all – wish you great success in your work and with your newly established collaborations.

– Angel Funding Committee and Sam Gambhir

fleischmann.jpgbammer.jpgDominik Fleischmann, MD; Roland Bammer, PhD
Cardiac Diffusion Weighted Imaging (cDWI) for Surveillance of Acute Rejection in Heart Transplantation



daldrup-link.jpgiv_m.jpgfischbein.jpgHeike Daldrup-Link, MD; Michael Iv, MD, PhD; Nancy Fischbein, MD
Ferumoxytol-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging for first-in-man immune therapy trials in Glioblastoma


rubin.jpgmallick.jpgDaniel Rubin, MD; Parag Mallick, PhD
Quantitative Assessment of the Role of Tumor Microenvironment in the Formation of Aggressive Tumor Niches


shah.jpgsegall.jpgRajesh Shah, MD; George Segall, MD
Noninvasive Assessment of Treatment-induced Hypoxia in Patients with Hepatocellular Carcinoma Undergoing Transcatheter Arterial Embolization: a Feasibility Study with 18F-FMISO PET/CT


willmann.jpgkamaya.jpgJuergen Willmann, MD; Aya Kamaya, MD
Early Detection of Treatment Response in Colorectal Cancer Liver Metastases using Volumetric Perfusion US Imaging


yeom.jpgplevritis.jpgKristin Yeom, MD; Sylvia Plevritis, PhD
Radiogenomic approaches to non-invasive molecular subtyping of adult and pediatric Glioblastoma


zeineh.jpgmcnab.jpgMichael Zeineh, MD, PhD; Jennifer McNab, PhD
Validation of Diffusion MRI Tractography using the CLARITY Method

Congratulations to All!

Aya Kamaya, MD Elected as Fellow of SRU

kamaya.jpgDr. Aya Kamaya, Assistant Professor of Radiology, Abdominal Imaging, has been elected as a Fellow in the Society of Radiologists in Ultrasound. Dr. Kamaya also serves on the Media Committee for SRU and has been part of an effort that has gained a presence for SRU on Facebook and are working on a new, more user-friendly website. What a great honor for Dr. Kamaya, congratulations!

2013 World Molecular Imaging Congress Award Recipients

Stanford Radiology's 2013 WMIC awardees

Congratulations to Stanford Radiology's 2013 World Molecular Imaging Congress award recipients!

Full details

Dr. Rubin Received RSNA Honored Educator Award

Photo of Daniel Rubin, MD, MSDaniel Rubin, MD, MS has earned a 2013 RSNA Honored Educator Award. The RSNA Honored Educator Award is awarded to select individuals who have demonstrated their commitment to radiology education through the RSNA. The award serves as a benchmark of academic productivity in support of a meaningful and successful radiology career.

Congratulations, Dr. Rubin!

Stephen Matzat Received Firestone Medal for Undergraduate Research

Photo of Stephen MatzatStephen Matzat, a graduating senior in human biology and a member of Garry Gold's lab, received the Firestone Medal for Undergraduate Research for his honors project, "Quantitative MR assessment of hip articular cartilage damage in patients with femoroacetabular impingement".

The Firestone Medal recognizes graduating seniors nominated by their academic programs or departments for undertaking honors projects in engineering and the social, physical and natural sciences.

Congratulations, Stephen!

Read the Stanford Announcement

Dr. Van Dalsem Elected to Fellowship in the ACR

Photo of Volney Van DalsemVol Van Dalsem, MD was elected to Fellowship in the American College of Radiology at the ACR Annual Meeting and Chapter Leadership Conference in Washington, D.C., on 5/5/2013.

Congratulations, Dr. Van Dalsem!

Dr. Zeineh Awarded RSNA Research Scholar Grant

DSC_0696_4x5.jpgMichael Zeineh, MD, has received a Research Scholar Grant from the Radiological Society of North America. The purpose of his Research Scholar Grant is to study traumatic brain injury in football players by performing longitudinal advanced magnetic resonance imaging.

Congtratulations, Dr. Zeineh!

Scott Hsieh's Manuscript Selected as Medical Physics Editor's Pick

The manuscript "The feasibility of a piecewise-linear dynamic bowtie filter" by Scott Hsieh, a graduate student in the Radiological Sciences Lab, has been selected to be highlighted under the Editor's Picks column for the Medical Physics Scitation site.

Congratulations, Scott!

Read manuscript

Dr. Lutz Received First-Time Genitourinary Paper Presenter Award

Photo of Dr. Amelie LutzAmelie M. Lutz received the First-Time Genitourinary Paper Presenter Award at the 2013 Society of Abdominal Radiology for the study "Molecular Ultrasound of Ovarian Cancer Targeting the Novel Vascular Cancer Marker CD276". Coauthors: Amelie M. Lutz; Sunitha Bachawal; Charles Drescher; Juergen K. Willmann; Sanjiv S. Gambhir

Congratulations, Dr. Lutz!

Congratulations to Scott Hsieh and co-authors

Hsieh_poster.jpgScott Hsieh and his coauthors, Guangzhi Cao, Brian Nett, and Norbert Pelc, won an award for a poster on their work, "Truncation artifact correction by support recovery" at the 2013 SPIE Medical Imaging Conference.

Congratulations to Scott Hsieh and Co-Authors!


Dr. Levin Elected to the AIMBE College of Fellows

Photo of Craig Levin, PhDCraig Levin, PhD, Professor of Radiology and, by courtesy, of Physics, Electrical Engineering, and Bioengineering, has been elected to the College of Fellows of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering (AIMBE) which comprises the top 2% of medical and biological engineers. Since its' founding in 1991, in addition to an institution recognizing outstanding achievements in the field, the AIMBE has been known as a leader in public policy issues affecting the medical and biological community.

After receiving his BS in Physics and Mathematics from UCLA, Dr. Levin received a MS and PhD in Physics from Yale. As director of the Molecular Imaging Instrumentation Laboratory (MIIL), Dr. Levin's research interests involve the exploration and creation of novel instrumentation and software algorithms for in vivo imaging of cellular and molecular signatures of disease in humans and small laboratory animal subjects. These new cameras efficiently image radiation emissions in the form of positrons, annihilation photons, gamma rays, and light from molecular probes developed to target molecular signals originating deep within tissue of live subjects. The goals of the research are the creation of technology innovations that substantially advance molecular imaging's ability to visualize and quantify lower concentrations of molecular probe in the presence of inherent background, and to introduce these novel instruments into clinical and preclinical research.

Radiology Technologists of the Year

Paulo Castaneda with Andrew Quon, MD and Andrei Iagaru, MD, Co-Chairs of the Nuclear Medicine & Molecular Imaging section

Paulo Castaneda, a Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging technologist displays his Radiology Technologist of the Year award with Section Co-Chiefs Andrew Quon, MD and Andrei Iagaru, MD.

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Julie Loero, a PA VAHCS technologist, displays her Radiology Technologist of the Year award with Section Chief, George Segall, MD.

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Gerald Encinias, anLPCH technologist, displays his Radiology Technologist of the Year award with Section Chief, Richard Barth, MD.

Congratulations to all!

Dr. Pitteri Received McCormick Faculty Award

Photo of Sharon PitteriSharon Pitteri, PhD Assistant Professor of Radiology at the Canary Center received the McCormick Faculty Award from the Office of Diversity and Leadership of the Stanford University School of Medicine.

The McCormick Funds were established to support the advancement of women in medicine and/or medical research directly, or by supporting the mentoring, training and encouragement of women pursuing the study of medicine, in teaching medicine, and engaging in medical research. Through this award, Dr. Pitteri will expand her work in identifying circulating glycoproteomic biomarkers for breast cancer early detection.

Congratulations, Dr. Pitteri!

Dr. Guido Davidzon won the Young Professional Competition

Guido Davidzon, MD, a Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging Resident, won the Young Professionals Competition in the 2nd Sino-American Nuclear Medicine Conference for his work on "Biodistribution and Kinetics of 18F FPPRGD2 PET/CT in the Evaluation of Suspected Recurrence in Glioblastoma Multiforme". He will represent the US in an exchange program with our Chinese colleagues.

Congratulations, Dr. Davidzon!

Dr. Iagaru was elected to the American College of Nuclear Medicine as a Fellow

Andrei Iagaru ACNM FellowAndrei Iagaru, MD, Co-chair of the Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging section, was elected as a fellow to the American College of Nuclear Medicine this year. This is a prestigious honor in recognition of the myriad activities he has done over the years to support the ACNM in its endeavors.

Congratulations, Dr. Iagaru!

2012 ARR Distinguished Investigators Award

Photo of Stanford Radiology Faculty named ARR 2012 Distinguished InvestigatorsThe Academy of Radiology Research is proud to announce Distinguished Investigators for 2012. This prestigious honor recognizes individuals for their accomplishments in the field of imaging research. Over the past few decades, the radiology research community has been responsible for many important advances that have had a profound impact on healthcare.

The Academy Induction Ceremony took place at this year’s RSNA on Monday, November 26, 2012. Dr. Stanley Baum, Chair of the Distinguished Investigator Working Group, presented the award. Congratulations to Stanford Radiology Faculty who are among those named as 2012 Distinguished Investigators!

Top (left to right):
Dan Spielman, PhD (RSL)
Jianghong Rao, PhD (MIPS)
Sylvia Plevritis, PhD (ISIS)
Sandy Napel, PhD (ISIS)
Craig Levin, PhD (MIPS)
Robert Herfkens, MD (Clinical)

Bottom (left to right):
Garry Gold, MD (Clinical, MSK)
Rebecca Fahrig, PhD (RSL)
Bruce Daniel, MD (Clinical)
Heike Daldrup-Link, MD (Clinical-Peds)
Kim Butts Pauly, PhD (RSL)
Roland Bammer, PhD (RSL)

Mehmet Günhan Ertosun Awarded 2012 Deans Fellowship

Photo of Mehmet Günhan ErtosunMehmet Günhan Ertosun, PhD, a member of the Molecular Imaging Instrumentation Lab, has been awarded a Dean's Postdoctoral Fellowship at the School of Medicine for his research project titled, "Novel Radiation Detector Capable of Measuring the Energy of Individual X-ray Photons at High Flux Rates". The Dean's Postdoctoral Fellowship at the School of Medicine is a longstanding program in support of postdoctoral research. The fellowships are made possible through generous gifts to the school.

Congratulations, Mehmet!

RSNA dedicates 2012 Meeting to Dr. Gary Glazer

Glazer_MAY1861-4x5.jpgRSNA will dedicate the 2012 annual meeting program to the memory of Gary M. Glazer, MD. George Bisset, RSNA President, will be making the introduction and Diane Glazer will be present to accept the
recognition on Gary's behalf.

Sunday, Nov 25th from 8:30 - 10:15am
Arie Crown Theater

This is a tremendous honor and recognition of Gary's visionary leadership
and contributions to Radiology.

Chinyere Nwabugwu Won Second Prize at IEEE BIBE

ieee-chinyere-nwabugwu-121115.jpgMs. Chinyere Nwabugwu, an EE graduate student in the Paik Lab (Imaging Bioinformatics Lab), presented her most recent research work entitled "Mathematical Modeling of the Interactions between Cellular Programs in Response to Oncogene Inactivation" at the IEEE 12th International Conference on Bioinformatics and Bioengineering (BIBE) in Larnaca, Cyprus. This work was done in collaboration with the lab of Dean Felsher and was partially funded by the ICMIC@Stanford P50 grant (NIH P50 CA114747, PI:Gambhir) and travel was funded by the School of Engineering and by the Bio-X program. Her work won second prize in the student paper competition.

Congratulations, Chinyere!

Dr. Gambhir Honored With Distinguished Scientist Award from WRSNM

Western Region Society of Nuclear Medicine honors Dr. GambhirSanjiv Sam Gambhir, MD, PhD was honored with the Distinguished Scientist Award for Distinguished Contributions to Nuclear Medicine at the 37th Annual Western Regional Meeting of the Society of Nuclear Medicine.

Congratulations, Dr. Gambhir!

Dr. Daniel Rubin Elected to the American College of Medical Informatics (ACMI)

Photo of Daniel RubinDaniel Rubin, MD, MS, Assistant Professor of Radiology and Medicine, has been voted a fellow of the American College of Medical Informatics. This is a great honor for Daniel, and reflects his sustained contribution to the field of biomedical informatics over the years. Daniel is the first AMCI Fellow from our Department.

ACMI is a professional society of elected Fellows from the United States and abroad who have made significant and sustained contributions to the field of medical informatics and who have met rigorous scholarly scrutiny by their peers. It is the central body for a community of scholars and practitioners who are committed to advancing the informatics field.

Congratulations, Dr. Rubin!

Important RSNA 2012 Events

Dr. Gambhir would like to encourage everyone to attend two important events being held at RSNA this year.

As you may have heard, RSNA will dedicate the 2012 annual meeting program to the memory of Gary M Glazer, MD. George Bisset, RSNA President, will be
making the introduction and Diane Glazer will be present to accept the
recognition on Gary's behalf. The dedication will occur during the opening
session which is Sunday, Nov 25th from 8:30 - 10:15am in the Arie Crown
Theater.

This is a tremendous honor and recognition of Gary's visionary leadership
and contributions to Radiology, so I wanted to be sure you were all aware of
the ceremony so you can plan to attend if you will be at RSNA.

Additionally, the Annual Oration in Radiation Oncology is being dedicated
to the memory of Malcolm Bagshaw, MD who passed away in September 2011.
This will be held Wednesday, November 28, at 1:30 p.m in the Arie Crown
Theater. Dr. Bagshaw was a former Chair of the Department of Radiology,
after Henry S Kaplan. In 1986, under Dr. Bagshaw, Radiology split into two
Departments: Diagnostic Radiology (which included a section of Nuclear
Medicine), and Radiation Oncology (which included Radiation Biology). Dr.
Bagshaw became the Chair of Radiation Oncology. The Annual Oration will
feature prostate cancer which was Dr. Bagshaw's major interest and for which
he was an international leader.

Finally, please save the date on your calendar for Stanford Radiology's RSNA
Alumni Reception which will be held on Tuesday evening, November 27th.
Details regarding time and location are forthcoming.

2012 World Molecular Imaging Congress Award Recipients

Stanford Radiology 2012 WMIC award recipients

Congratulations to Stanford Radiology's 2012 World Molecular Imaging Congress award recipients!

Full details

Dr. Lina Nayak Selected to Serve on AAMC Organization of Resident Representatives

Photo of Lina NayakDr. Lina Nayak, a second year radiology resident at Stanford, has been selected from a pool of national nominees as one of only two radiology residents to serve on the American Association of Medical Colleges’ Organization of Resident Representatives (ORR) as a representative of the Society of Chairmen of Academic Radiology (SCA).

Lina will attend American Association of Medical Colleges meetings and will contribute some resident perspective to AAMC policy decisions. In addition, this position offers leadership and professional development opportunities for those interested in academic medicine careers, through venues with peers, specialty society and faculty leaders, and related members of the medical education community.

2012 Department of Radiology Angel Funding Recipients

The Department of Radiology, the Angel Funding Review committee, and Dr. Sam Gambhir are pleased to announce this year’s winners of angel funding to advance their research and eventually apply for longer term funding. The novel projects funded include new partnerships within the Department, high risk projects, and first-in-man studies. Congratulations to all – wish you great success in your work and with your newly established collaborations.

– Angel Funding Committee and Sam Gambhir

biswal.jpgmoseley.jpgSandip Biswal, MD; Michael Moseley, PhD
Co-Investigators: Matthew Smuck, MD; Deqiang Qiu, PhD; Deepak Behera, DNB
Focused magnetic nanoparticle theragnostics for chronic pain



ghanouni.jpgsegall.jpghongYu.pnghovsepian.jpgPejman Ghanouni, MD, PhD; George Segall, MD; Hong Yu, MD; David Hovsepian, MD
A feasibility study to evaluate the safety and initial effectiveness of MR-guided focused ultrasound surgery in the treatment of facetogenic lumbar back pain


Iagaru.jpgAndrei Iagaru, MD
Co-Investigators: Arutselvan Natarajan, PhD; Erik Mittra, MD, PhD; Ranjana Advani, MD
Assessing response to treatment in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma patients using 64Cu-DOTA-Rituximab PET/CT


kothary.jpgNishita Kothary, MD
Co-Investigators: Sandy Napel, PhD; Sylvia Plevritis, PhD; Aya Kamaya, MD; Parag Mallick, PhD
Development of predictive models of vascular invasion in hepatocellular carcinoma


pitteri.jpglipson.jpgSharon Pitteri, PhD; Jafi Lipson, MD
A pilot study of correlative imaging, leukocyte telomere length, and circulating telomerase levels of patients with benign and malignant breast lesions


quon.pngwu.jpgAndrew Quon, MD; Joseph Wu, MD, PhD
Co-Investigators: Andrei Iagaru, MD; Patricia Nguyen, MD
Indium-111 labeled stem cell imaging for monitoring myocardial stem cell therapy


willmann.pngkamaya.jpgJuergen Willmann, MD; Aya Kamaya, MD
Co-Investigators: George A. Fischer, MD, PhD; Dimitre Hristov, PhD; Lu Tian, PhD
Early detection of treatment response in patients with colorectal cancer liver metastases using volumetric perfusion ultrasound imaging

Congratulations to Drs. Biswal, Moseley, Ghanouni, Segall, Yu, Hovsepian, Iagaru, Kothary, Pitteri, Lipson, Quon, Wu, Kamaya, and Willmann and to each of their Co-Investigators!

Jesse Jokerst Received NIH Loan Repayment Program Grant

Photo of Jesse Jokerst, PhDJesse Jokerst, PhD, a Postdoctoral Fellow in the Stanford Molecular Imaging Scholars (SMIS) program, received an award from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Clinical Loan Repayment Program (LRP). This award is for work in tandem with the Canary Center's Early Detection Research Network program on prostate cancer detection and staging.

Congratulations, Jesse!

Viswam Nair 2012 LUNGevity Career Development Award Recipient

Photo of Viswam S. Nair, MD, MSViswam Nair, MD, MS, a Clinical Instructor and Postdoctoral Research Fellow in the Multimodality Molecular Imaging Lab (MMIL) and Cancer Systems Lab, is a recipient of a 2012 LUNGevity Foundation Career Development Award for his project, “In-vivo and in-vitro diagnostics to improve lung cancer care.”

LAY ABSTRACT: My goal is to improve medical care for patients with a lung nodule discovered on imaging scans by fusing currently available molecular imaging techniques with circulating biomarkers that can be detected in blood during routine lab testing. Thousands of solitary pulmonary nodules (SPNs) are discovered annually in patients, many during imaging for other reasons, and many are potentially lethal. Physicians remain uneasy about this development since these nodules could be cancerous and aggressive approaches that lead to unnecessary testing, including invasive biopsies and unnecessary surgery, are common. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) imaging assesses the metabolism of lung nodules, increases the accuracy of a physician’s diagnosis and treatment strategy for the lung nodule patient, and is widely used–but even PET remains imprecise. We therefore plan on investigating whether molecular biomarkers in blood can increase the utility of PET imaging in clinical practice. The concept here is “one-stop shopping,” where a patient can obtain the standard of care in molecular imaging (PET) with a routine blood test during an appointment that will increase the accuracy of a clinician’s diagnosis and facilitate the appropriate decision making process for the patient. This could have a cost-effective impact on medical care for patients with a concerning lung nodule by not only increasing diagnostic accuracy but also by augmenting an outdated staging system used to classify lung cancer prognosis.

Congratulations, Viswam!

2012 Departmental Teaching Awards

Congratulations to the 2012 Radiology Departmental Teaching Awardees!

Michael Chiou, MD2012 Chiefs' Appreciation Award
Michael Chiou, MD



Michael Cutalo, MD2012 Chiefs' Appreciation Award
Michael Cutalo, MD


Bao Do, MD2012 Clinical Educator of the Year
Bao Do, MD


Dominik Fleischmann, MD2012 Senior Faculty of the Year
Dominik Fleischmann, MD


Jafi Lipson, MD2012 Junior Faculty of the Year
Jafi Lipson, MD


margaret-lin.jpg2012 Adjunct Clinical Faculty of the Year
Margaret Lin, MD


Robert Mindelzun, MD2012 Resident Advocate Award
Robert Mindelzun, MD


caroline-yu.jpg2012 Fellow Teaching Award
Caroline Yu, MD

 

Dr. Joseph Wu Received a CIRM Early Translational III Award

Joseph Wu, MD, PhDDr. Joseph Wu has been awarded $4.8 million from the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine in the third round of its Early Translational Awards to further his work in researching the use of pluripotent stem cells as therapy to heal damaged hearts.

Congratulations, Dr. Wu!

More information

Dr. Sharon Pitteri Received 2012 ASMS Research Award

Dr. Sharon Pitteri Received 2012 ASMS Research AwardSharon Pitteri, PhD received the 2012 American Society for Mass Spectrometry (ASMS) Research Award, at the 60th Annual ASMS Conference in Vancouver, Canada. The award provides funding for her work on microRNAs for ovarian cancer early detection.

Congratulations, Dr. Pitteri!

Brady Quist awarded an NSF Fellowship

bradyquist.jpgBrady Quist is currently working on his PhD in Electrical Engineering at Stanford University. As a graduate student in Dr. Brian Hargreaves' Body MRI group in the Radiological Science Lab (RSL), Brady is excited to continue exploring his interests and research in magnetic resonance imaging and looks forward to a career in the field of medical imaging. We are pleased to announce Brady's success in securing an NSF fellowship - a great vote of confidence for his work and good support for him during the next 3 years of training.

ISMRM Junior Fellow Awards

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Stanford University Radiological Sciences Laboratory announces two ISMRM
fellows who share the limelight at this year's 2012 ISMRM in Melbourne,
Australia: Priti Balchandani, PhD and Deqiang Qiu, PhD.

Congratulations!

Murat Aksoy & Melvyn Ooi Elected Incoming ISMRM Leaders

Murat Aksoy, PhD, and Melvyn Ooi, PhD, are both incoming ISMRM leaders as Chair and Program Director, respectively, for the Detection & Correction of Motion in MRI & MRS Study Group. These positions are filled through election by the ISMRM membership and are in recognition of achievement in this specific area. Please join Gary Glover and Roland Bammer in congratulating Murat and Melvyn on these important career milestones.

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Murat Askoy, PhD
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Melvyn Ooi, PhD

Sarah Bohndiek Awarded AACR-Amgen Fellowship in Clinical/Translational Cancer Research

sarah-bohndiek.jpgSarah Bohndiek, PhD, a Postdoctoral Fellow in the Multimodality Molecular Imaging Lab has been awarded the AACR-Amgen Inc. Fellowship in Clinical/Translational Cancer Research for work on photoacoustic imaging of ovarian cancer with targeted nanoparticles.

Congratulations, Sarah!

Prachi Pandit Received ISMRM Magna Cum Laude Merit Award

prachi-pandit.jpgPrachi Pandit, PhD, a Postdoctoral Fellow in the Stanford Molecular Imaging Scholars (SMIS) program and member of the Cellular & Molecular MRI Lab has been awarded the Magna Cum Laude Merit Award for the 20th Annual ISMRM meeting for her abstract entitled "Gadolinium-based "Smart" MRI Probes for Enzyme-targeted Cancer Imaging".

Congratulations, Prachi!

Rosalinda Castaneda's Paper Receives SPR Walter Berdon Award

rosalinda.jpgRosalinda Castaneda, a former pre-doctoral trainee in Dr. Heike Dalrup-Link's, Translational Tumor & Stem Cell MR Imaging Lab, has been awarded the Society for Pediatric Radiology's 2011 Walter E. Berdon Best Basic Science Paper in Pediatric Radiology for her paper, MR Imaging of Human Embryonic Stem Cell Derived Cardiomyocytes: Should iron oxide nanoparticle labeling occur before or after differentiation? Pediatr Radiol. 41(11): 1384-1392, 2011.

The SPR website explains that "the Berdon award recognizes the best Clinical and Science papers submitted to the journal of Pediatric Radiology in the year preceding the meeting. This award was established to honor Walter Berdon who served as the North American Editor of Pediatric Radiology for 30 years and who stepped down as editor on June 30, 2003."

Scott Hsieh Poster Received Honorable Mention at 2012 SPIE Physics of Medical Imaging Conference

Scott Hsieh, Graduate Student in the Radiological Sciences Lab (mentor, Norbert Pelc). Scott’s poster, "A volumetric reconstruction algorithm for stationary source inverse-geometry CT", was one of only 8 posters given Honorable Mention at this year's SPIE Physics of Medical Imaging Conference. Please join in congratulating Scott Hsieh.

A Celebration to Honor Professor Norbert Pelc

Pelc_Group_0583.jpg Please join us for a celebration to honor Prof. Norbert J. Pelc's induction into the National Academy of Engineering, for "Development of algorithms and technologies for MRI, CT, and hybrid X-ray/MRI imaging." Norbert's contributions to the field and Stanford University have been remarkable. This recognition of his achievements is well deserved and we are all very proud his career success and the distinction that he has brought to himself and Stanford Radiology.

Come toast Norbert on this great accomplishment:

Date: Friday, February 17th
Time: 11:30am
Location: Lucas Center Expansion Light Court (1201 Welch Road)

From the NAE 2/9 press release: Election to the NAE is one of the highest professional distinctions that can be accorded an engineer. Academy membership honors those who have made outstanding contributions to "engineering research, practice, or education, including, where appropriate, significant contributions to the engineering literature," and to the "pioneering of new and developing fields of technology, making major advancements in traditional fields of engineering, or developing/implementing innovative approaches to engineering education."

Breast Imaging Section receives Center of Excellence Designation

Congratulations to the Stanford Cancer Institute's Breast Imaging Department, which has just been designated as a Center of Excellence by the American College of Radiology (ACR). This ACR certification means the Breast Imaging Department meets or exceeds nationally accepted standards.

Awards and Honors: R. Brooke Jeffrey, MD

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Dr. Brooke Jeffrey, Section Chief and Associate Chair for Academic Affairs, was awarded the 2011 Faculty of the Year. Brooke has been in the Department of Radiology for over two decades and has served in many critical roles for both the Department of Radiology and the Medical School. He is a SUPERB Radiologist and tremendous mentor to many junior and senior faculty.

Congrats Dr. Jeffrey!

Awards and Honors: Susan Kopiwoda, MS, MPH

Susan Kopiwoda was awarded the 2011 Department of Radiology Employee of the Year. Susan was selected for this award by the Division Chiefs and Vice Chairs. Susan has done a terrific job with respect to helping faculty and others with all grant submissions and in looking for new grant opportunities. This is a 24/7 job with multiple stressful demands. Susan always gives a 110% effort and is a terrific role model for many with her
positive can-do attitude.

Congrats Susan!

Jung-Yeol Yeom Awarded Deans Fellowship

Photo of Jung-Yeol YeomJung-Yeol Yeom, PhD, a member of the Molecular Imaging Instrumentation Lab (MIIL), has been awarded the Deans Fellowship for the 2011-2012 academic year.

Congratulations, Jung-Yeol!

Awards and Honors: Ashley McDevitt

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At the Radiology Staff Meeting, January 5th, 2012, Joni Schott presented Ashley McDevitt with the 'Radiology Technologist of the Year' award. The award honors her for her respect, teamwork, and compassion towards her patients and co-workers.

Congratulations to Ashley McDevitt, Stanford Radiology's Technologist of the Year!

Matthew Bieniosek Selected as Training in Biomedical Imaging Instrumentation Fellow

matthew-bieniosek.jpgMatthew Bieniosek, a PhD candidate in the Molecular Imaging Instrumentation Lab (MIIL), has been selected as a fellow in the "Training in Biomedical Imaging Instrumentation (TBI2)" program for the 2011-2012 academic year.

Congratulations, Matthew!

Judy Nguyen Received Norman D Poe Memorial Scholarship Award for MD In-Training

Photo of Judy NguyenJudy Nguyen, a Nuclear Medicine resident, received the Norman D Poe Memorial Scholarship Award for MD In-Training at the Western Regional SNM 36th Annual Meeting held in Seattle for the research project "Clinical Utility of 18F FDG PET/CT and 99mTc MDP Bone Scintigraphy in Patients with Ewing's Sarcoma and Other Sarcomas".

Congratulations, Judy!

Key Jo Hong Received National Research Foundation of Korea Fellowship

Photo of Key Jo HongKey Jo Hong, a postdoctoral fellow in the Molecular Imaging Instrumentation Lab (MIIL) was awarded a postdoctoral fellowship from the National Research Foundation of Korea.

Congratulations, Key!

Jing-yu Cui Awarded Bio-X Graduate Fellowship

Photo of Jing-yu CuiJing-yu Cui, a graduate student in the Molecular Imaging Instrumentation Lab (MIIL), was awarded a Bio-X Graduate Fellowship.

Congratulations, Jing-yu!

Clinically-Relevant Regulatory Networks in the Lung Tumor Microenvironment (1U01CA154969-01A1)

Dr. Sylvia Plevritis and a multidisciplinary team of Stanford investigators were recently awarded a U01 grant to reconstruct the first Tumor Microenvironment Interactome (TMI) of human lung adenocarcinoma, which will identify regulatory interactions between human malignant cells and their associated infiltrating immune cells, endothelial cells and fibroblasts. This work promises to reveal novel therapeutic targets, as well as potential combinations of existing therapeutics, that could lead to more effective treatment of human lung adenocarcinoma. This project, on its own presents a novel pathway to understanding cell-cell interactions and therapeutic targets, but also builds an important link to the Napel/Plevritis R01 (Tools for Linking and Mining Image and Genomic Data in NSCL cancer) by allowing for entirely new image-pathology associations with the tumor microenvironment.

Awards and Honors: Kim Butts Pauly, PhD

Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Guided Cancer Interventions (MRI-GCI) (1P01CA159992-01)
Dr. Kim Butts Pauly has been awarded a Program Project Grant that aims to develop and test controlled minimally invasive thermal ablation techniques for the treatment of cancers that are attributed to a quarter of cancer deaths. We aim to provide precise imaging, feedback, and control of the shape and size of thermal lesions. Dr. Pauly and her team are developing and testing controlled minimally invasive thermal ablation techniques for the treatment of cancers that are responsible for a quarter of cancer deaths. This Program Project Grant (PPG) is made up of five R01-like projects that are linked in their aims to develop and test controlled minimally invasive thermal ablation techniques for the treatment of cancers in soft-tissue, brain, prostate, and gut using MRI-guided focused ultrasound and RF ablation. The outcomes of this PPG will be 1) improved minimally-invasive treatment options, 2) an increase in the basic science understanding of tissue response to thermal treatments, and 3) advances in engineering, both hardware and software, specifically for treatment of these cancers.

Paul Reynolds Received 2011-2012 ARCS Scholar Award

Photo of Paul ReynoldsPaul Reynolds, a graduate student in the Molecular Imaging Instrumentation Lab (MIIL), has received a 2011-2012 ARCS Scholar Award.

Congratulations, Paul!

Tools for Linking and Mining Image and Genomic Data in Non-small Cell Lung Cancer (1R01CA160251-01)

Dr. Sandy Napel and Dr. Sylvia Plevritis were recently awarded an R01 grant that seeks to link CT and PET images of lung cancer to microarray analyses of excised tumors. To do this we will develop tools and technologies that characterize these images with quantitative image features, and that explore relationships between these image features, genomic information from the microarrays, and other clinical data including survival. We are concentrating on a single disease, non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC), the leading cause of cancer death with an overall 5-year survival rate of 16% that has not changed appreciably over the past 15 years. However these tools are applicable to a wide range of imaging and disease scenarios, and have the potential to reduce the need for biopsies as well as to improve the specificity of disease diagnosis, a step in the direction of image-guided personalized medicine.

Jing-yu Cui Awarded HHMI Fellowship

Photo of Jing-yu CuiJing-yu Cui, a graduate student in the Molecular Imaging Instrumentation Lab (MIIL), was awarded a fellowship from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute.

Congratulations, Jing-yu!

Laura Sasportas Awarded HHMI Fellowship

Photo of Laura Sarah SasportasLaura Sasportas, a graduate student in the Multimodality Molecular Imaging Lab (MMIL), was awarded a fellowship from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute.

Congratulations, Laura!

Morgan Wang Received Stanford Dean's Fellowship Award

Photo of Huaijun WangHuaijun (Morgan) Wang, MD, PhD, a postdoctoral fellow in the Translational Molecular Imaging Lab (TMIL), received the Stanford Dean's fellowship award 2011/2012.

Congratulations, Morgan!

Awards and Honors II: June 28, 2011

KamayaAya_100.gifAya Kamaya, MD, assistant professor of radiology (diagnostic), was awarded the 2011 Wylie J Dodds Research Award from the Society of Gastrointestinal Radiologists for her outstanding research on "Prognostic Value of Early Changes in Liver Metastases Treated with Bevacizumab Determined Study" (coinvestigators: Grace Tye, MD, and Dominik Fleischmann, MD).

Dr. Kamaya completed a fellowship in abdominal imaging at Stanford in 2005, and has been a faculty member in the abdominal imaging section at Stanford since then. During this time, she was given two teaching awards for her outstanding contributions to resident education, compassionate patient care, and research. She is currently the associate fellowship director of the Stanford Abdominal Imaging Fellowship.

Dr. Kamaya completed her residency in diagnostic radiology at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, where she was awarded the Executive Council Award from the American Roentgen Ray Society for her work on "Color Doppler Twinkling Artifact" and the Laurence A. Mack Research Award from the Society of Radiologists in Ultrasound for her work on "Linear Streak Artifact." She completed medical school at the University of Utah in her hometown of Salt Lake City.

As an undergraduate, she double majored in engineering sciences and Asian Studies, securing her two bachelor's degrees at Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire. Her research interests include investigating new ultrasound technologies such as photoacoustic ultrasound, in conjunction with the Electrical Engineering Department at Stanford; liver imaging; and women's imaging. Outside of work, her favorite activities include skiing and snowboarding (her favorite ski resort is Snowbird, UT), as well as running, surfing, and traveling.

Please view her prior blog postings: "Awards and Honors: July 28, 2010"; "Awards and Honors: July 20, 2010"; and "New Faculty Hires and Promotions: January 23, 2008."

Awards and Honors: June 20, 2011

Gold01B.jpgGarry E. Gold, MD, associate professor of radiology and (by courtesy) bioengineering and orthopedics at Stanford University, has been awarded the Allan V. Cox Medal Faculty Excellence Fostering Undergraduate Research. Named after the former dean of the School of Earth Sciences, the Cox Medal is presented annually to faculty who have "established a record of excellence in directing undergraduate research"
(http://humsci.stanford.edu/faculty/awards/cox_medal).

Dr. Gold received his master's degree in electrical engineering from Stanford in 1988 and his MD from Stanford in 1992. He has authored over 120 journal articles, 250 abstracts, and 6 patents in MRI. He has been the principal investigator or a co-investigator on over 30 funded research projects, and he is the principal investigator on 2 NIH-funded projects to improve MR imaging of osteoarthritis and the use of real-time MRI for the study of biomechanics. He has also been awarded a President’s Medal from the International Skeletal Society as well as the Lauterbur Award for the Best MRI Paper 6 times from the Society for Computed Body Tomography and Magnetic Resonance (SCBT/MR). Dr. Gold reviews manuscripts for 10 peer-reviewed journals, including the Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (JMRI) and the Journal of Magnetic Resonance in Medicine (MRM) , and he is on the editorial board of several publications.

At Stanford, he practices clinical musculoskeletal radiology and teaches medical students, residents, and fellows; in one of his courses, imaging physics and human anatomy, he also teaches undergraduates and graduate students. In recognition of his teaching, he was awarded the 2005 Kaiser Award for outstanding and innovative contributions to education. He also serves as an advisor and co-advisor for many engineering graduate students and postdoctoral fellows. To view his prior blog postings, please access “Awards and Honors: May 27, 2011”; "Awards and Honors: February 22, 2010"; "Awards and Honors: March 25, 2009"; "Drs. Gold and Hargreaves' Osteoarthritis Research Featured on ABC7 News"; "Drs. Gold and Hargreaves Detect Osteoarthritis Using Sodium MRI"; "People and Their Pets: Humboldt"; "Awards and Honors: April 18, 2008"; "Awards and Honors: April 17, 2008"; "Awards and Honors: October 23, 2007"; "Awards and Honors: February 2007"; and "New Faculty Hires and Promotions: January 2006-February 2007"


Awards and Honors: June 10, 2011

Gambhir100120.jpgSanjiv Sam Gambhir, MD, PhD, Virginia & D.K. Ludwig Professor of radiology & bioengineering; director of the molecular imaging program at Stanford (MIPS); director of the Canary Center for Cancer Early Detection at Stanford; chief of the Nuclear Medicine Division; and member of the Bio-X Program, has received the 2011 Georg Charles de Hevesy Nuclear Pioneer Award from the Society of Nuclear Medicine (SNM). The Award bears the name of Georg Charles de Hevesy, who is considered the father of nuclear medicine.

According to SNM President Dominique Delbeke, MD, PhD, “Dr. Gambhir has made extraordinary contributions to the field of molecular imaging," and "he is leading the way to shape the future of nuclear medicine and molecular imaging" (from the June 5, 2011 SNM press release "Sanjiv Sam Gambhir, MD, PhD, Receives SNM’s 2011 Georg Charles de Hevesy Nuclear Pioneer Award").

A world-renowned leader in the field, Dr. Gambhir is transforming the imaging sciences and patient treatment through his expertise and leadership in cellular and molecular imaging. Dr. Gambhir has over 22 years of experience in molecular imaging in both animal models and patients. At Stanford, he also leads several large NCI-funded programs, such as the In Vivo Cellular Molecular Imaging Center (ICMIC); the Center for Nanotechnology Excellence Focused on Therapy Response (CCNE-TR); and the Stanford Molecular Imaging Scholars (SMIS) Program.

Dr. Gambhir's other awards include the 2009 Outstanding Researcher Award from the Radiological Society of Northern America; the Distinguished Clinical Scientist Award from the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation; the Holst Medal; the Tesla Medal; and the Hounsfield Medal from Imperial College, London. In 2008, he became one of the youngest elected members to the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies.

To view some of his prior blog entries, please access "In the News: Dr. Avnesh Thakor, MD, PhD, and Colleagues in the Laboratory of Sanjiv Sam Gambhir, MD, PhD"; "Stanford Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging Clinic Opens"; "Two New Books by Dr. Gambhir--Molecular Imaging with Reporter Genes and Molecular Imaging: Principles and Practice"; "ABC 7 Spotlights Canary Center for Cancer Early Detection at Stanford"; "Awards and Honors I: July 7, 2010"; and "Let the Good Times Roll . . . RSNA Awards Continue." His award is also featured in Inside Stanford Medicine: http://med.stanford.edu/ism/people/index.html#hargreaves0611.


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Awards and Honors: June 6, 2011

NormanBlankAward_Jessica.jpgJessica Sin, fourth-year graduating medical student and 2012-2016 radiology resident, has received the 2011 Norman Blank Award, which was created in memory of longtime faculty member and Director of Admissions Norman Blank, MD. Jessica received this award in recognition of her outstanding performance in radiology research.

Her mentor, Dr. Garry Gold, described her as “an outstanding student who did a tremendous job on a very difficult multidisciplinary research project with me.” Jessica has been working with Dr. Gold comparing F18 PET findings with MRI in patients with hip pain caused by femoroacetabular impingement by running the PET scanner and MRI systems and scanning multiple volunteers and patients. In addition to publishing multiple papers on her PhD research in chemistry, she is preparing a manuscript with Dr. Gold on their F18 PET project. “She is one of the brightest students I have worked with,” said Dr. Gold, “and I’m very excited she is coming to Stanford.”

Jessica received her AB in chemistry and French from Dartmouth College. She went on to complete her PhD in chemistry at Princeton University and a PhD in philosophy from Massachusetts Technical Institute (MIT) before starting medical school at Stanford. After graduation, Jessica will be pursuing an intern year in medicine at Greenwich Hospital in Greenwich, Connecticut. When she returns to Stanford for her residency in July of 2012, Jessica will be training in radiology, similar to her mother, who is a radiologist in Canada where Jessica was born and raised. Jessica’s father is also a practicing physician in Canada where he specializes in pathology.

Please view blog postings regarding prior award winners: Rebecca Rakow-Penner, MD/PhD, Awards and Honors II: June 29, 2010; Yingbing Wang, MD, Awards and Honors II: July 17, 2008 ; and Melissa Enriquez, MD, Awards and Honors: June 26, 2007.

Awards and Honors: May 27, 2011

Gold01B.jpgGarry E. Gold, MD, associate professor of radiology and (by courtesy) bioengineering and orthopedics at Stanford University, has been named a Fellow of the International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine (ISMRM) for his “significant and substantial contributions to research in a field within the Society’s purposes” (from http://www.ismrm.org/ISMRMFAQ.htm#1).

Dr. Gold received his master's degree in electrical engineering from Stanford in 1988 and his MD from Stanford in 1992. He has authored over 60 journal articles, 170 abstracts, and 5 patents in MRI. He has been the principal investigator or a co-investigator on over 30 funded research projects, and he is the principal investigator on 2 NIH-funded projects to improve MR imaging of osteoarthritis and the use of real-time MRI for the study of biomechanics. He has been awarded a President’s Medal from the International Skeletal Society and the Lauterbur Award for the best MRI paper 6 times from the Society for Computed Body Tomography and Magnetic Resonance (SCBT/MR). Dr. Gold reviews manuscripts for 10 peer-reviewed journals, including the Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (JMRI) and the Journal of Magnetic Resonance in Medicine (MRM), and he is on the editorial board of several publications.

At Stanford, he practices clinical musculoskeletal radiology for medical students, residents, and fellows. He teaches 2 courses in imaging physics and human anatomy for medical students and graduate students, and he was recently awarded the Kaiser Award for outstanding and innovative contributions to education. He also serves as an advisor and co-advisor for many engineering graduate students and postdoctoral fellows. To view his prior blog postings, please access "Awards and Honors: February 22, 2010"; "Awards and Honors: March 25, 2009"; "Drs. Gold and Hargreaves' Osteoarthritis Research Featured on ABC7 News"; "Drs. Gold and Hargreaves Detect Osteoarthritis Using Sodium MRI"; "People and Their Pets: Humboldt"; "Awards and Honors: April 18, 2008"; "Awards and Honors: April 17, 2008"; "Awards and Honors: October 23, 2007"; "Awards and Honors: February 2007"; and "New Faculty Hires and Promotions: January 2006-February 2007"

Awards and Honors: May 19, 2011

Atlas2011_150.jpgScott W. Atlas, MD, professor and chief of neuroradiology as well as senior fellow at the Hoover Institution, received the University of Illinois Alumni Achievement Award on May 15, 2011, at the University of Illinois Commencement in Champaign-Urbana, Illinois in recognition of career achievement.

Established in 1957, this award is the highest honor bestowed upon alumni of the University of Illinois by the University of Illinois Alumni Association on behalf of the University. The award is presented to those alumni who have attained outstanding success and national or international distinction in their chosen business, profession, or life’s work, and whose accomplishments reflect admirably on or bring honor to their Alma Mater.

Recognized throughout the world as a leader in educational and clinical research, Dr. Atlas serves on the Nominating Committee for the Nobel Prize in Medicine and Physiology. He is also an adviser to major industry leaders in medical technology, and he has a special interest in healthcare public policy. Publishing than 100 scientific articles in leading journals, he is the editor of the foremost textbook within his field, Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Brain and Spine.

To read prior blog articles featuring Dr. Atlas, please access "Awards and Honors: May 18, 2011"; "In the News: Stanford's Neuroradiology Fellowship Program Ranked First in the U.S."; “'Research Gains at Risk' by Dr. Scott Atlas Featured in The Washington Times"; "Awards and Honors: March-April 2007"; "Awards and Honors: September 29, 2008"; "Sanford/Atlas: Alternatives to Government Health Takeover"; "Dr. Atlas' Commentary on Our Healthcare System Featured in The Washington Times"; and "Commentary by Dr. Atlas: 'Mr. Health Care: Ted Kennedy's Lifelong Passion' and 'Why Are These Health Care Fixes Ignored?'"


Awards and Honors: May 18, 2011

Atlas2011_150.jpgScott W. Atlas, MD, professor and chief of neuroradiology as well as senior fellow at the Hoover Institution, presented the 67th Annual George W. Holmes Lectureship entitled “Technology and Innovation in Radiology” at the New England Roentgen Ray Society (NERRS) meeting on April 8, 2011. Delivering his lecture at the Joseph B. Martin Conference Center at Harvard Medical School in Boston, Dr. Atlas spoke as part of the 92nd Annual Scientific Program of the NERRS, the oldest regional radiological society in America. To read more, please download the program: http://www.nerrs.org/pdf/NERRS_Booklet_2010.pdf.

Dr. Atlas is recognized as a world leader in both education and clinical research and has been on the Nominating Committee for the Nobel Prize in Medicine and Physiology for several years. His research has centered on advanced applications of new MRI technologies in neurologic diseases, and he has authored more than 120 scientific publications in leading journals. In addition, Dr. Atlas' work includes investigations into the effects of the changing healthcare marketplace on technology-based innovations in medicine, and he has lectured throughout the world on a variety of topics, most notably advances in MRI of the brain, and the key economic issues related to the future of such technology-based advances.

To read prior blog articles featuring Dr. Atlas, please access "In the News: Stanford's Neuroradiology Fellowship Program Ranked First in the U.S."; “'Research Gains at Risk' by Dr. Scott Atlas Featured in The Washington Times"; "Awards and Honors: March-April 2007"; "Awards and Honors: September 29, 2008"; "Sanford/Atlas: Alternatives to Government Health Takeover"; "Dr. Atlas' Commentary on Our Healthcare System Featured in The Washington Times"; and "Commentary by Dr. Atlas: 'Mr. Health Care: Ted Kennedy's Lifelong Passion' and 'Why Are These Health Care Fixes Ignored?'"

Awards and Honors: May 5, 2011

DSouza_0071_100.jpgAloma D'Souza, PhD, research scientist in the laboratory of Dr. Gary M. Glazer, chair of Stanford Radiology and Emma Pfeiffer Merner Professor in the Medical Sciences, has received the 2011 "Highly Rated Poster Award" at the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) 102nd Annual Meeting in Orlando, FL. The abstract and poster ranked in the top 2% of the accepted abstracts at the meeting.

Her award-winning poster entitled "A Novel Method of Tumor Characterization by Protein and microRNA Biomarker Release Using Ultrasound" is her second poster award. In 2010, she and Dr. Glazer were honored with the Award Winning Poster in the category of “Ultrasonic Imaging and Drug Delivery” at the World Molecular Imaging Conference.

Dr. D'Souza joined the Department in July of 2007 as the laboratory manager for Dr. Glazer. Together with Dr. Sam Gambhir, MD, PhD, she runs a research laboratory that focuses on studying the effects of low frequency ultrasound on the release of biomarkers and earlier cancer detection. Dr. D'Souza received her doctorate degree and completed a postdoctoral fellowship in biochemistry at Rush University, Chicago, where her research centered on cartilage biomarkers, in vitro engineered cartilage, and osteoarthritis. Prior to Stanford, Dr. D'Souza worked at Genentech, Inc., in the Department of Molecular Oncology. Her work included the functional identification and characterization of tumor over-expressed proteins and the evaluation of potential targets for intervention with therapeutic agents. In her spare time, she enjoys traveling, photography and art.

Awards and Honors: March 28, 2011

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Kazim Narsinh, research fellow in the Multimodality Molecular Imaging Laboratory (MMIL), has been awarded the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) Research & Education Foundation's Research Medical Student Grant for his proposal "Imaging Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocyte Transplants." Mentored by Dr. Wu, Kazim's research interests include induced pluripotent stem cell biology, multimodal molecular imaging, and gene- and cell-based therapies for cardiovascular disease. Some of his work was recently published in the March 1, 2011 issue of the Journal of Clinical Investigation: "Single Cell Transcriptional Profiling Reveals Heterogeneity of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells" (121(3):1217-21).

Kazim studied Biochemistry at UC Berkeley prior to attending medical school at UC San Diego. He will begin his general surgery internship at Stanford in July 2011.

To read about his prior award, please access "Awards and Honors II: April 20, 2009."

Awards and Honors: March 24, 2011

Hsiao100.jpgAlbert Hsiao, MD, PhD, third-year Stanford radiology resident, has been awarded the Residents in Radiology President’s Award from the American Roentgen Ray Society (ARRS), which he will receive at the 2011 ARRS.

Mentored by Dr. Shreyas Vasanawala, Dr. Hsiao won the award for his manuscript on 4D phase-contrast MRI tentatively entitled "Fast Pediatric Cardiac MR Flow and Ventricular Volume Assessment" (co-authored by Drs. Michael Lustig, Marcus Alley, Mark Murphy, Frandics Chan, Robert Herfkens, and Shreyas Vasanawala). This project demonstrates that accurate flow and volume measurements could be simultaneously acquired with precision comparable to, and possibly exceeding, conventional cardiac MRI with SSFP and 2D phase-contrast. Perhaps even more importantly, the parallel-imaging compressed-sensing 4D phase-contrast acquisition could be performed in under 10 minutes, on average, which means that in the future, we may be able to minimize the risk of cardiac anesthesia even further in our pediatric cardiac patients.

Dr. Hsiao studied biology, computer science, and engineering at Caltech as an undergraduate and returned home for medical school at the University of California, San Diego, where he completed a PhD program in bioengineering with an emphasis in bioinformatics. After completing a year of general surgery internship at Stanford, he joined our Department as a first-year resident in 2008. Now in his third year of our Residency Program, Dr. Hsiao works primarily with Drs. Vasanawala, Chan, and Herfkens to develop practical clinical applications for 4D flow MRI.

Dr. Hsiao also recently welcomed his newborn son, Matthew, into the world.

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For his prior blog posting, please see "Awards and Honors: April 26, 2010" and "Welcome New Residents."

Awards and Honors: March 9, 2011

Published research by Nirupama Deshpande, PhD, and co-authors, Ying Ren, PhD, Kira Foygel, PhD, Jarrett Rosenberg, PhD, and Juergen Willmann, MD, was recently featured in the "Science to Practice" Section of Radiology (2011;258(3):655-656). In their featured paper, “Tumor Angiogenic Marker Expression Levels during Tumor Growth: Longitudinal Assessment with Molecularly Targeted Microbubbles and US Imaging," Dr. Deshpande and her coauthors from the Translational Molecular Imaging Laboratory (TMIL) describe their research using targeted microbubbles that can track the molecular profiles of tumor angiogenic marker expressions in murine models of breast, ovarian, and prostate cancer in vivo.

According to the March 2011 "Science to Practice" section of Radiology, their research promises to aid the development of imaging methods that "could help select patients for more individualized angiogenic inhibitor therapy on the basis of tumor vessel molecular expression patterns," which is greatly desired. To read more, please access "Science to Practice: Angiogenic Marker Expression During Tumor Growth—Can Targeted US Microbubbles Help Monitor Molecular Changes in the Microvasculature?" by Peter L. Choyke, MD, from the molecular imaging program at the NIH.

Awards and Honors: March 8, 2011

Iagaru_09_100.pngAndrei Iagaru, MD, has received the Best Essay Award at the 2011 Mid-Winter Society of Nuclear Medicine/American College of Nuclear Medicine (SNM/ACNM) Annual Meeting for his abstract "Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma in First Complete Remission: Is There a Role for 18F FDG PET/CT Surveillance."

Dr. Iagaru was recruited as assistant professor of radiology in September 2010, with a subspecialty in nuclear medicine. He completed medical school at Carol Davila University of Medicine, Bucharest, Romania, and an internship at Drexel University College of Medicine, Graduate Hospital, in the Department of Medicine. He began his residency at the University of Southern California (USC) Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles, in the Division of Nuclear Medicine, where he was the chief resident. Dr. Iagaru finished his residency and completed a PET/CT fellowship at Stanford University's School of Medicine in the Division of Nuclear Medicine. His research interests include whole-body MRI and PET/CT for early cancer detection; clinical translation of novel PET radiopharmaceuticals; radioimmunotherapy; optical imaging of breast cancer; as well as PET/CT imaging for thyroid, breast, cervical and ovarian cancers, melanoma, lymphoma, and sarcomas.

Over the past 3 years as an instructor in nuclear medicine, Dr. Iagaru has received several awards including the Society of Nuclear Medicine (SNM) 2009 Image of the Year Award; SNM/American College of Nuclear Medicine (ACNM) Mid-Winter Conference 2010 Best Essay Award; 2009 Western Regional SNM Scientist Award; and a Stanford Cancer Center 2009 Developmental Cancer Research Award in Translational Science . With his interests, background, and training, Dr. Iagaru will find many opportunities for collaboration, teaching, and introducing his successful research into the clinical practice of nuclear medicine.

Please see his other award postings: "Awards and Honors I: June 29, 2010"; "Awards and Honors: March 15, 2010"; "Awards and Honors: July 17, 2009"; "Awards and Honors: May 26, 2009"; and "Awards and Honors I: July 15, 2008".

Awards and Honors: March 7, 2011

sun_conroy.jpgConroy Sun, PhD, a postdoctoral fellow in the Image Guided Intervention Laboratory, has received a Breast Cancer Research Program (BCRP) Fellowship Award from the Department of Defense (DOD) to support the development and research of X-ray luminescent nanophosphors for use in breast tumor detection and treatment.

Dr. Sun received his joint PhD degree in materials science & engineering as well as nanotechnology from the University of Washington (UW) in 2008. During his graduate studies in Professor Miqin Zhang’s biomaterials laboratory, Dr. Sun investigated the synthesis and surface modification of superparamagnetic nanoparticles for applications in cancer diagnosis and treatment. After working as a senior fellow in the UW Department of Neurological Surgery under Dr. Richard Ellenbogen, Dr. Sun joined the laboratory of Dr. Lei Xing in 2009 to research targeted X-ray/optical nanoparticles for molecular imaging. Under the co-mentorship of Drs. Xing and Sanjiv Sam Gambhir, Dr. Sun is currently developing a multifunctional radioluminescent nanoparticle platform to enhance radiotherapy of breast tumors, which is supported by the BCRP postdoctoral fellowship.

In addition to the BCRP Award, some of Dr. Sun’s other achievements include a 2010 World Molecular Imaging Conference (WMIC) Travel Award and the publication of over 18 articles.

Awards and Honors: February 15, 2011

Balchandani_150.jpgPriti Balchandani, PhD, postdoctoral scholar in the Radiological Sciences Laboratory (RSL), is the recipient of a K99/R00 NIH Pathway to Independence Award from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. Her grant is entitled "High Resolution Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Spectroscopy of Epilepsy at 7T." The K99/R00 award provides funding for 5 years to assist postdoctoral investigators in transitioning to a stable independent research position as faculty.

Dr. Balchandani's research is focused on novel RF pulse and pulse sequence design for human MR imaging and spectroscopy. She is particularly interested in harnessing the power of high-field MR magnets to visualize the brain in unprecedented detail. Her work on overcoming some of the main limitations of operating at high magnetic fields has resulted in several first authored publications as well as patent applications and selection as a finalist for the International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine (ISMRM) 2008 Young Investigator Award. She was also named a Junior Fellow of the ISMRM, an honor awarded to young researchers of outstanding quality and promise, with significant potential for helping the Society achieve its mission. Dr. Balchandani received her BS in computer engineering at the University of Waterloo and her PhD in electrical engineering at Stanford University.

Please access her prior blog postings at "Awards and Honors: March 18, 2010" and "Awards and Honors: July 3, 2008."

Awards and Honors: February 14, 2011

dave_radhika_150.jpgRadhika Dave, MD, is the recipient of a 2011 Resident-In-Training Travel Scholarship by the Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR). Rad is a first-year Stanford Radiology resident.

Growing up outside of Chicago, Rad attended Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology where she received a degree in chemical engineering and minored in biomedical engineering and Spanish. Before attending medical school at Indiana University School of Medicine, she worked as an engineering intern at Dow Chemical and GE Plastics. Rad was happy to move to California to complete a transitional internship in San Diego, before making her way to Stanford.

She enjoys traveling, running, scuba diving, hiking, dancing, and exploring the Bay area.

To view her prior blog posting, please access "Our New Residents for 2010!"

Awards and Honors: February 9, 2011

Faruque_150.jpg Jessica Faruque, MS, has been a awarded a research grant by the Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) for her research project, "Developing a Scalable Similarity Reference Standard for a Content-Based Image Retrieval (CBIR) System." Along with her co-mentors, Sandy Napel, PhD, and Daniel Rubin, MD, MS, Ms. Faruque will be developing a gold standard for perceptual visual similarity in liver CT lesions in content-based image retrieval for medical decision support. In her project, she will define visual attributes of images that enable assessment of similarity, and she will conduct and validate experiments to develop similarity gold standards using a variety of approaches. She will also create a publicly available image database with corresponding gold standards for the research community.

Ms. Faruque is currently a PhD candidate in the Stanford Department of Electrical Engineering, where she also received her MS. She completed her BS from California Polytechnic State University in San Luis Obispo, where she was a double major in math and electrical engineering.

Funded by a Bio-X Grant and an NIH National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS) Training Grant in Biomedical Computation, Ms. Faruque has conducted research in medical imaging, with a focus on observer studies of medical images with perceptual data, content-based image retrieval systems, and machine learning techniques to aid medical applications/diagnosis. Ultimately, she plans to pursue a research career in imaging and informatics.

Outside of research, she enjoys painting, photography, and rock climbing.

Awards and Honors: February 4, 2011

Chan_keith_150.jpgKeith Chan, MS, has been awarded the 2011 Dr. Constantin Cope Medical Student Award from the Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR). Mentored by Lawrence "Rusty" Hofmann, MD, associate professor and chief of interventional radiology, Keith received this award in recognition of his abstract entitled "Common Iliac Vein Stenosis: A Risk Factor for Oral Contraceptive-Induced Deep Vein Thrombosis" which will be presented this March.

After receiving his BS in biomedical engineering from Columbia University, Keith earned his MS in mechanical engineering from Stanford University, where he is currently a fourth-year medical student in the School of Medicine. For the past 3 years, Keith has collaborated with the Interventional Radiology Section to investigate the association between vascular anatomy and venous thromboembolism. His prior experiences in the medical device industry include the development of the world’s first needle-free continuous blood glucose monitoring system and an implantable artificial heart. In addition, he has published his research in 7 articles and abstracts and has attained 6 patents. His future goal is to improve health outcomes and patient quality-of-life with innovative and cost-effective use of technology.

Awards and Honors: February 2, 2011

Christine Ghatan, MD, has been awarded a 2011 Resident-in-Training Travel Scholarship by the Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR). Dr. Ghatan is currently a radiology resident at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, in the Department of Imaging, where she also completed an internship in the Department of Surgery.

While she was a medical student at the Keck School of Medicine, Dr. Ghatan completed a rotation in the Stanford Interventional Radiology Section. Mentored by Nishita Kothary, MD, assistant professor of radiology (diagnostic), she and Dr. Kothary produced a poster for presentation at the 2010 Society of Interventional Radiology Annual Meeting: "Making the Case for Early Medical Student Education in Interventional Radiology: A Survey of Second-Year Students in a U.S. Institution." In addition, Dr. Ghatan has presented 3 other posters and published 4 articles based on her research. Her interests outside of residency include beach volleyball, sewing, and architectural conservancy in Los Angeles.

Awards and Honors: February 1, 2011

laeseke_paul.jpgPaul Laeseke, MD, PhD, has been awarded a Resident-in-Training Travel Scholarship by the Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR). Dr. Laeseke is currently a first-year resident in our Department, where his research interests include thermal tissue ablation; medical imaging; and image-guided cancer therapies.

Prior to starting his residency in diagnostic radiology, Dr. Laeseke completed an internship in general surgery at the Maine Medical Center in Portland, ME. Graduating from the University of Wisconsin Medical Scientist MD/PhD Training Program, he was awarded the Dr. B.K. and Tomina Lovell Scholarship from the Department of Radiology, which recognizes worthy and deserving students entering the field of radiology. As a doctoral student in biomedical engineering, Dr. Laeseke developed a strong interest in targeted cancer therapies, particularly thermal tumor ablation, and his research has focused on devices and techniques for multiple-applicator thermal ablation.

Dr. Laeseke has authored numerous manuscripts, book chapters, patents, and abstracts on his research, and he has presented at multiple international meetings. As a result, his work has received several awards and honors, including the Top Abstract award at the 2008 World Congress of Interventional Oncology. In addition, Dr. Laeseke is a founding member of NeuWave Medical, a biotechnology company that specializes in minimally invasive energy-based medical devices.

Other personal achievements include winning the 2006 Lakefront Marathon, Milwaukee, WI, and competing in the 2005 Ironman Triathlon World Championship in Kailua-Kona, HI.

In the News: Brian Rutt, PhD

Rutt_150.gifBrian Rutt, PhD, professor of radiology and director of the High-Field Imaging Program, has been awarded a major grant for designing a new method for labeling cells and tracking them down to the single cell level with MRI. Awarded by the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM), Dr. Rutt’s grant was 1 of only 3 imaging awards.

According to a recent press release, "CIRM Approves Funding $32 Million to Remove Hurdles to New Stem Cell Therapies," the CIRM awarded the 19 stem cell grants to "create new tools and technologies that overcome barriers to moving stem cell research into clinical trials," which promises to "accelerate the development of stem cell-based therapies for people of the world." Dr. Rutt's research was singled out for specific mention in the press release.

Before coming to Stanford, Dr. Rutt was a scientist at the Robarts Research Institute and professor of diagnostic radiology and nuclear medicine at the University of Western Ontario, where he has held the Barnett-Ivey Endowed Research Chair, Heart and Stroke Foundation since 1997. At Robarts, he co-founded the Cellular and Molecular Imaging Program; served as the scientific director for the 1.5T and 3T research MRI facilities; and established a hardware engineering core facility. Under his direction, the first 1.5T MRI scanner and one of the first 3T MRI systems in Canada were installed in London, Ontario.

After completing his BASc in engineering science at the University of Toronto, Ontario, Dr. Rutt received his master's degree in electrical engineering from Stanford, returning to Canada to attain his PhD in medical biophysics at the University of Western Ontario. Subsequently, he completed a postdoc at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF). His research interests include MRI technology development and the application of advanced MRI techniques for studying the cardiovascular system, brain, and cancer.

Please access his prior blog articles: "Awards and Honors III: February 13, 2009" and "Meet Brian Rutt, PhD, Professor of Radiology and Director of Our High-Field MRI Program at Stanford Radiology."

Awards and Honors: January 10, 2011

c panje_150.jpgCedric Panje, 5th-year medical student at Lübeck University, Germany, was awarded the 2010 RSNA Travel Award for Young Investigators in Molecular Imaging for his paper entitled, “Influence of Microbubble and DNA Doses on in Vivo Ultrasound-mediated Gene Delivery with Cationic vs Neutral Microbubbles” (M.A. Pysz, D.S. Wang, Y. Ren, M. Schneider, and J.K. Willmann).

While at Stanford as a visiting researcher, Cedric’s work focused on in vivo application of therapeutic ultrasound and microbubbles for gene delivery, which was supported by a fellowship from the German National Academic Foundation. He pursued his research under the guidance of Dr. Juergen Willmann in the Translational Molecular Imaging Lab (TMIL) during a 1-year research sabbatical from Lübeck University in Germany where he is currently finishing the 5th year of his 6-year medical school program.

When he is not working, Cedric enjoys hiking, the opera from Mozart to Wagner, and classic literature. After finishing his studies, Cedric plans to pursue a career in academic radiology.

Awards and Honors: January 4, 2011

Kuo_mosrrecent150.jpgWilliam Kuo, MD, assistant professor of vascular and interventional radiology and CV/interventional fellowship director, has been awarded the 2011 Dr. Gary J. Becker Young Investigator Award by the Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR). Bestowed in honor of the founding editor of the Journal of Vascular and Interventional Radiology (JVIR), this award "promotes excellence in academic research for members early in their careers" and recognizes "the importance of the young investigator in developing the interventional solutions for the future" (from http://www.sirfoundation.org/grants-awards/becker_award.shtml). Dr. Kuo received this award for authoring the "most outstanding clinical science research paper" submitted for consideration.

Dr. Kuo received a BS degree with honors from Duke University and he earned an MD degree from Wake Forest University School of Medicine with distinction in radiology, winning the Meschan Award for Radiology Excellence. After completing his surgical internship at Virginia Mason Hospital in Seattle, WA, he trained in a combined interventional and diagnostic radiology residency program at the University of Rochester Medical Center where he served as chief resident and became one of the first in the nation to complete the Clinical Pathway in Vascular and Interventional Radiology. Following residency, Dr. Kuo received advanced endovascular training by completing his fellowship at Stanford University Medical Center.

Dr. Kuo is an international authority on catheter-directed treatment of acute PE and complex IVC filter retrieval. He is currently principal investigator of the Stanford FILTER (Filter Immediate and LongTerm Evaluation after placement and Retrieval) registry and the multicenter PERFECT (Pulmonary Embolism Response to Fragmentation, Embolectomy, and Catheter Thrombolysis) registry. As a nationally recognized expert, he has testified before the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and he has authored multiple seminal papers, which have led to improvements in the treatment of venous thromboembolism and new therapies for embedded IVC filters. Dr. Kuo has pioneered the use of endovascular laser technology for complex filter retrieval, as described in his current paper “Photothermal Ablation With the Excimer Laser Sheath Technique for Embedded IVC Filter Removal: Initial Results from a Prospective Study.” His team at Stanford is the first in the world to successfully use this innovative procedure in humans. Dr. Kuo has applied his expertise to treat many patients from around the country, and he has established the Stanford IVC Filter Clinic as a national and international referral center for the management of filter-related complications.

To read his prior blog articles, please access "In the News: Drs. Kothary, Kuo, and Hofmann"; "In the News: William Kuo, MD"; "Dr. William Kuo and Colleagues Reveal Lifesaving Treatment for Pulmonary Embolism"; "Dr. Kuo Honors His Patients in the LiveStrong Challenge"; "Awards and Honors: April 3, 2008"; and "New Faculty Hires and Promotions: January 2006-February 2007."


Awards and Honors: January 3, 2011

RubinDaniel2_150.jpgDaniel Rubin, MD, MS, assistant professor of radiology and a member of both Bio-X and the Stanford Cancer Center, has received the Radiological Society of North America's (RSNA) Cum Laude Award for his educational exhibit: “Natural Language Processing in Radiology."

One of the top three educational exhibits in informatics, “Natural Language Processing in Radiology" was motivated by the massive amount of text that confronts radiologists, both in terms of radiology reports and radiology literature. Dr. Rubin's project reviews the key methodologies in natural language processing and demonstrates how computational methods can extract key information from radiology text sources and structure this information in ways that will enable radiologists to improve their practice and help researchers to make new discoveries.

Dr. Rubin's background is in clinical and investigational radiology as a radiologist and as a researcher. He attended Stanford Medical School and received his master's degree in biomedical informatics. He also completed his residency as well as his body and research fellowships at Stanford University. Dr. Rubin was recruited to Stanford Radiology to participate in building a new section in the information sciences called ISIS (Information Science in Imaging at Stanford). His academic focus is on the intersection of biomedical informatics and imaging science where he is developing computational methods and applications to access and integrate diverse clinical and imaging data; to extract information and meaning from images; to enable data mining and the discovery of image biomarkers; and to translate these methods into practice by creating computer applications that will improve diagnostic accuracy and clinical effectiveness. Dr. Rubin is also chair of the RadLex Steering Committee of the RSNA, an effort to create a standard terminology for all of radiology; chair of the Informatics Committee of the American College of Radiology Imaging Network (ACRIN) and co-chair of the Medical Imaging Systems Working Group of the American Medical Informatics Association.

To read prior articles regarding Dr. Rubin's accomplishments, please access "Awards and Honors: December 1, 2010"; Awards and Honors: October 28, 2010"; "Dr. Rubin Receives NCI Grant for Quantitative Imaging Research"; "New Faculty Hires and Promotions: December 17, 2008" and "Awards and Honors: December 15, 2008."


Awards and Honors: December 15, 2010

Sandra Rodriguez_2009.jpgSandra Rodriguez, MS R(RT)(MR), MR research technologist, has been awarded the Professional Advancement Scholarship, which was funded by Toshiba in memory of Judith Behrens, who passed away on August 25, 2009. Ms. Behrens worked as an MRI applications specialist for General Electric, Hitachi, Siemens, and Toshiba Medical Systems.

The Professional Advancement Scholarship "assists radiologic technologists completing a certificate or undergraduate or graduate degree in the radiologic sciences." To read more about Ms. Rodriguez's award, please access the American Society of Radiologic Technologists (ASRT) website where you can view her photo; read the press release regarding her award, "ASRT Foundation Awards $15,000 in Scholarship Funds to Radiologic Technologists Earning Degrees"; and view the 2010 list of award winners.

Ms. Rodriguez earned her Bachelor of Science in Health Administration (BSHA) in an online program through the University of Phoenix in September of 2008. She has completed the Master's Program in Health Administration and received her degree in November 2010. As an MRI technologist at the Lucas Center, Ms. Rodriguez helps users set-up for their studies and facilitates their scans, providing support whenever necessary. She also does quality assurance on our three scanners and makes sure they are running smoothly. In her free time, Ms. Rodriguez enjoys cardio kickboxing; reading; and trying to keep up with a teenage girl (her daughter).

For her prior awards listings, please access "Awards and Honors: April 19, 2010"; Awards and Honors: February 19, 2010; Awards and Honors: August 11, 2009; and Awards and Honors: April 9, 2008.

Awards and Honors: December 1, 2010

RubinDaniel2_150.jpgDaniel Rubin, MD, MS, assistant professor of radiology and a member of both Bio-X and the Stanford Cancer Center, was awarded the Distinguished Paper Award from the American College of Medical Informatics (AMIA). His article, “Natural Language Processing for Lines and Devices in Portable Chest X-Rays,” was 1 of the 5 best papers selected to receive this Award from among those presented at the AMIA 2010 meeting.

Dr. Rubin’s paper describes methods and results for developing natural language processing methods to extract information from dictated radiology reports to deduce the presence of medical devices and their dwell time in patients. The goal of this work is to enable large-scale data mining of radiology reports to catalyze epidemiological and comparative effectiveness research, such as understanding how occurrence and length of infections relate to presence and dwell time of medical devices. The motivation of Dr. Rubin's work on natural language processing of radiology texts is to “structure the unstructured radiology information” contained in narrative text to enable data mining and computer-based inference on vast archives of radiology data. The vision of his laboratory is to exploit massive collections of images and reports collected during routine clinical care to enable new radiology discoveries and translational applications.

Dr. Rubin's background is in clinical and investigational radiology as a radiologist and as a researcher. He attended Stanford Medical School and received his master's degree in biomedical informatics. He also completed his residency as well as his body and research fellowships at Stanford University. Dr. Rubin was recruited to Stanford Radiology to participate in building a new section in the information sciences called ISIS (Information Science in Imaging at Stanford). His academic focus is on the intersection of biomedical informatics and imaging science where he is developing computational methods and applications to access and integrate diverse clinical and imaging data; to extract information and meaning from images; to enable data mining and the discovery of image biomarkers; and to translate these methods into practice by creating computer applications that will improve diagnostic accuracy and clinical effectiveness. Dr. Rubin is also chair of the RadLex Steering Committee of the RSNA, an effort to create a standard terminology for all of radiology; chair of the Informatics Committee of the American College of Radiology Imaging Network (ACRIN) and co-chair of the Medical Imaging Systems Working Group of the American Medical Informatics Association.

To read prior articles regarding Dr. Rubin's accomplishments, please access "Awards and Honors: October 28, 2010"; "Dr. Rubin Receives NCI Grant for Quantitative Imaging Research"; "New Faculty Hires and Promotions: December 17, 2008" and "Awards and Honors: December 15, 2008."


Awards and Honors: November 22, 2010

Ringertz100120.jpgHans Ringertz, MD, PhD, has received the Special Presidential Award by the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) for his "significant contributions to the field of radiology or the radiologic sciences." Dr. Ringertz will receive his award at the 2010 RSNA.

According to 2010 RSNA President Hedvig Hricak, MD, PhD, Drhc, Dr. Ringertz “is the pioneer of pediatric MR imaging, a world leader in radiation safety, and headed one of the most prestigious university radiologic departments in the world. His membership on and presidency of the Nobel committee always ensured biomedical imaging a fair review.” Dr. Ringertz describes receiving the Special Presidential Award "as unreal—it is I who should express my gratitude to American radiology for all the possibilities it has given to me" ("Special Presidential Award."). To read more about his award, please access the RSNA News: "Special Presidential Award."

Dr. Ringertz was professor and chairman of the Department of Radiology at the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm from 1984 to 2006 and is currently serving as professor emeritus. Dr. Ringertz has a long history with the Karolinska Institute where he obtained his medical degree and a doctorate in biophysics 5 years later. Early on, Dr. Ringertz held research positions at the Institute's Department of Physiology and Department of Medical Physics. In 1969, he began a residency in diagnostic radiology. Only 9 years later, he became chair of the Department of Radiology at the Sachs' Pediatric Hospital in Stockholm. He returned to the Karolinska Institute in 1984. Dr. Ringertz has also served as a visiting professor in the Department of Radiology at the Lucile Packard Children's Hospital, Stanford University Hospital. He is a member of more than 24 professional organizations and has acted as an invited lecturer or chairman at many scientific and professional meetings and workshops. He has received numerous awards, including honorary memberships in 14 radiological societies such as Honorary Fellow of the American College of Radiology (FACR); Honorary Fellow of the Royal College of Radiologists, London, England, (FRCR); and Honorary Fellow Faculty for Radiologists of the Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland (FFRRCSI). In 2003, he was chair of the Nobel Assembly at the Karolinska Institute. Dr. Ringertz serves as editor or ad hoc referee on the editorial board of a dozen medical publications worldwide. He was president of the European Association of Radiology from 1997 to 1999 and was awarded the Gold Medal of the European Congress of Radiology and the European Association of Radiology.

To view his prior blog posting, please access "Awards and Honors: February 2007."

Awards and Honors: November 19, 2010

Wu_100100.jpgJoseph Wu, MD, PhD, has received the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers, "the highest honor bestowed by the United States government on science and engineering professionals in the early stages of their independent research careers" ("Emerging Scientists Win Federal Award"). Dr. Wu was named by President Obama to receive this Award as 1 of 85 scientists who "have shown such tremendous promise so early in their careers" and who will make "discoveries that will continue to move our nation forward in the years ahead" ("President Honors Outstanding Early-Career Scientists").

Ten federal departments and agencies annually nominate the most "meritorious scientists and engineers whose early accomplishments show the greatest promise for assuring America’s preeminence in science and engineering and contributing to the awarding agencies' missions" ("President Honors Outstanding Early-Career Scientists"). Nominated by . . .

the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), Dr. Wu is 1 of 4 Stanford scientists to receive this award, which includes up to 5 years of funding to pursue innovative research. To read more, please access "Stem Cells to Hypersonic Vehicles: Four Young Scientists Win Presidential Award."

Prior to joining our faculty, Dr. Wu completed his fellowship and residency at the University of Los Angeles (UCLA) Medical Center. He received his MD from Yale University School of Medicine and his PhD from UCLA Department of Molecular Pharmacology. Dr. Wu's clinical interests include adult congenital heart disease, nuclear cardiology, and echocardiography. His basic research focus is on the biological mechanisms of adult stem cells, embryonic stem cells, and induced pluripotent stem cells. He and his team use a combination of gene profiling, tissue engineering, physiological testing, and molecular imaging technologies to better understand stem cell biology in vitro and in vivo. They are interested in monitoring stem cell survival, proliferation, and differentiation for adult stem cells, while for embryonic stem cells, they are currently studying their tumorigenicity, immunogenicity, and differentiation. Further information is available at his lab website: http://wulab.stanford.edu/.

Dr. Wu has published over 100 articles. He has also received many awards, including the Burroughs Wellcome Fund Career Award for Biomedical Scientists, the American College of Cardiology Cardiovascular Imaging Award, the Baxter Foundation Faculty Award, the NIH Director’s New Innovator Award, and the NIH Transformative R01 Award.

To read more about Dr. Wu's prior awards, please see "New Faculty Hires and Promotions: Joe Wu, MD, PhD"; "In the News: Joe Wu, MD, PhD"; "Awards and Honors I: October 9, 2009"; "Research by Dr. Wu and Colleagues Induces Fat Cells to Become iPS Cells"; "Awards and Honors: April 17, 2009"; http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2008/11/awards_and_hono_63.html; http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2008/10/_joseph_wu_md_p.html ; http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2008/06/awards_and_hono_42.html ; and http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2007/04/awards_and_hono_1.html.

Awards and Honors: November 12, 2010

HofmannLawrenceRusty_150150.jpgLawrence "Rusty" Hofmann, MD, associate professor and chief of interventional radiology, is the inaugural recipient of the Ohio State School of Medicine Early Career Achievement Award for his significant contributions to the field of medicine before the age of 40. In addition to "distinguished early career achievement," the Award criteria includes "demonstrated leadership capability"; "commitment to the service of others"; "potential for leadership/distinction in the long term"; and "substantial commitment to College of Medicine, OSU Medical Center and its mission" (Early Career Achievement Award ).

Dr. Hofmann received his medical degree from the Ohio State University School of Medicine and completed his residency in diagnostic radiology at The Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, Maryland, where he was elected chief resident. He completed his fellowship in cardiovascular and interventional radiology at Stanford University Medical Center and returned to The Johns Hopkins Hospital to become an assistant professor of radiology and surgery for five years before coming to Stanford in 2006.

Dr. Hofmann's clinical research interests include the minimally invasive treatment for deep venous thrombosis as well as the treatment of pulmonary embolus. Focusing on novel therapies for the treatment of cancer, Dr. Hofmann's basic science research interests are concentrated on the development of molecular image-guided therapies. He is a founding member of the American Journal of Nanomedicine, and he has published extensively in peer-reviewed journals, including the American Journal of Roentgenology, the Journal of Vascular Surgery, and the Journal of Vascular and Interventional Radiology. His many medical affiliations include membership in the Society of Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology and the American Roentgen Ray Society.

In his free moments, Dr. Hofmann enjoys spending time with his family watching the Ohio Buckeye football games and taking his three sons fishing on his boat.

To view his prior blog postings, please access "In the News: Drs. Kothary, Kuo, and Hofmann"; "Stanford IR Research Honored at SIR"; "Dr. Lawrence "Rusty" Hofmann Featured in AuntMinnie.com"; "New Interventional Radiology Rooms Open in the Stanford Comprehensive Cancer Center (SCCC)/Advanced Medical Center (AMC)"; and "New Faculty Hires and Promotions: January 2006-February 2007."

Awards and Honors: November 6, 2010

GloverAward_350.jpg

Gary Glover, PhD, director of the Radiological Sciences Laboratory in the Richard M. Lucas Center for Imaging; professor of radiology and, by courtesy, of electrical engineering and of psychology, has been awarded the Outstanding Achievement Award by his alma mater, the University of Minnesota, where he earned his undergraduate and graduate degrees in electrical engineering. University President Robert Bruininks presented the Award to Dr. Glover at a special awards ceremony.

The Outstanding Achievement Award is the second highest honor given by the University of Minnesota and is not bestowed annually but only when there are "graduates who have attained unusual distinction in their professions or in public service, and who have demonstrated outstanding achievement and leadership" ("President of ATG Labs Receives Outstanding Achievement Award").

Prior to joining our Department in 1990, Dr. Glover worked at GE’s Corporate Research and Development Center and at GE Medical Systems for more than 20 years. Dr. Glover’s research focuses on the physics and mathematics of CT and MR imaging. Through his research, he has helped develop products that have greatly improved patient care. He has published more than 300 scientific research articles and is named on approximately 50 patents. One of Dr. Glover's research interests was published in an article he coauthored entitled “Control Over Brain Activation and Pain Learned by Using Real-Time Functional MRI" in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA (PNAS) (2005 102:18626-18631; published online before print December 13, 2005, doi:10.1073/pnas.0505210102).

To access his prior blog postings, please see "Awards and Honors: March 3, 2010";
"The Laughing Subject"; "Pain Research by Drs. Sean Mackey, Chris deCharms, Gary Glover, and Colleagues Featured in Nature"; and "Tsinghua University's 'Oversea Expert,' Dr. Gary Glover."


Awards and Honors: October 28, 2010

rubin_jpg_100.gifDaniel Rubin, MD, MS, assistant professor of radiology and a member of both Bio-X and the Stanford Cancer Center, was awarded the 2010 caBIG® Connecting Collaborators Award for his outstanding achievements in enabling collaborations and advances in research within the caBIG program.

caBIG® stands for the "cancer Biomedical Informatics Grid®," which is an "information network enabling members of the cancer community–researchers, physicians, and patients–to share data and knowledge," according to the caBIG® website. Their mission is "to develop a truly collaborative information network that accelerates the discovery of new approaches for the detection, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of cancer, ultimately improving patient outcomes." To learn more, please access https://cabig.nci.nih.gov/overview/.

Dr. Rubin's background is in clinical and investigational radiology as a radiologist and as a researcher. He attended Stanford Medical School and received his master's degree in biomedical informatics. He also completed his residency as well as his body and research fellowships at Stanford University. Dr. Rubin was recruited to Stanford Radiology to participate in building a new section in the information sciences called ISIS (Information Science in Imaging at Stanford). His academic focus is on the intersection of biomedical informatics and imaging science where he is developing computational methods and applications to access and integrate diverse clinical and imaging data; to extract information and meaning from images; to enable data mining and the discovery of image biomarkers; and to translate these methods into practice by creating computer applications that will improve diagnostic accuracy and clinical effectiveness. Dr. Rubin is also chair of the RadLex Steering Committee of the RSNA, an effort to create a standard terminology for all of radiology; chair of the Informatics Committee of the American College of Radiology Imaging Network (ACRIN) and co-chair of the Medical Imaging Systems Working Group of the American Medical Informatics Association.

Other prior blog articles regarding Dr. Rubin include "Dr. Rubin Receives NCI Grant for Quantitative Imaging Research"; "New Faculty Hires and Promotions: December 17, 2008" and "Awards and Honors: December 15, 2008."

Awards and Honors: September 3, 2010

Contag_100.jpgChristopher Contag, PhD, associate professor of pediatrics (neonatology); associate professor of microbiology & immunology; and associate professor (by courtesy) of radiology, has been awarded a grant by the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM) to fund his stem cell research; he is one of four Stanford researchers to receive an award from the CIRM. According to a recent CIRM press release, "CIRM Allocates $25 Million to Overcome Immune Rejection of Stem Cell Transplantation Therapies," funded research will "develop strategies for overcoming rejection, eliminating potential barriers to moving stem cell therapies to the clinic."

Dr. Contag received both his BS (biology) and PhD (microbiology) from the University of Minnesota. He began his career at Stanford as a postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Microbiology and Immunology studying mother to infant transmission of HIV. This field of study brought him to the Department of Pediatrics, first as a pediatrics fellow in Division of Neonatal and Developmental Medicine, and then as an assistant professor in the Department of Pediatrics, specializing in neonatal and developmental medicine. In this position he sought to pull together the fields of microbiology, pediatrics, and radiology in projects aimed at imaging diseases of the neonate.

Currently, Dr. Contag serves as the associate chief (research) of the . . .

Division of Neonatal and Developmental Medicine and the director of both the Stanford Center for Innovation in In Vivo Imaging (SCI3) as well as the Stanford Center for Photomedicine. He is also the co-director of the Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford (MIPS). As director of the Molecular Biophotonics and Imaging Laboratory (MBIL), Dr. Contag, along with his colleagues, has used imaging to reveal the kinetics of stem cell engraftment and hematopoietic reconstitution, elucidating the nature of minimal residual disease states following cancer therapy and identifying tissue sites that pathogens use to evade the host immune response. Much of this work has used optical methods of molecular imaging, which are extremely powerful in preclinical models and have tremendous potential, but the Contag laboratory seeks to use a wide range of molecular imaging tools to study biology in living animals and humans.

Dr. Contag and his colleagues both develop and use these tools to address biological questions in a multimodality format. The focus of their efforts is the cells and molecules that control the body’s response to insult and that enable the regeneration of damaged tissues and organs. This has led to the development of miniaturized microscopes that can be used for early cancer detection, in vivo studies of cell biology, and image-guided resection.

As part of the recently awarded CIRM grant, Dr. Contag will work with his colleagues, Dr. Michael Bachmann, research associate in the Contag Lab, and Dr. Minnie Sarwall, professor of pediatrics (nephrology), on immunomodulators that can control graft rejection. These will be screened using an in vivo gene screen, where effector proteins are functionally selected in transplanted stem cells. This will reveal key molecules that control immune recognition and rejection, and will lead to selection of molecular targets for controlling rejection of stem cells and newly regenerated tissues.

Dr. Contag has authored over 200 publications; his other recent awards include the Achievement Award from the Society of Molecular Imaging, the opening plenary lecture at the European Society for Molecular Imaging in Warsaw, Poland, and an invited lecture at the Regenerative Medicine Conference in Hilton Head, South Carolina.

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Awards and Honors: August 31, 2010

Quon_100.gifAndrew Quon, MD, assistant professor of radiology (nuclear medicine), and Ivan Cheng, MD, assistant professor of orthopaedic surgery, have received seed funding from the Center for Biomedical Imaging at Stanford (CBIS) for their project, "18F-Sodium Flouride PET/CT for the Pre-Surgical Evaluation of Back Pain."

Andrew Quon, MD, is currently the chief of the PET/CT Clinical Service. Prior to coming to Stanford, Dr. Quon was a clinical staff physician at the University of California, Los Angeles, Medical Center (UCLA). He earned his BA in biology from the University of California, Berkeley, (UCB) before entering medical school at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center. After receiving his MD, Dr. Quon went on to complete his residency in nuclear medicine at the University of California, Los Angeles, Medical Center (UCLA). His research projects include investigations into the use of translational imaging agents, such as 18F-5FU, 18F-FLT, and 18F-NaF. He has published over 40 peer-reviewed articles on his research. In addition to the Walter Wolf Award, Dr. Quon's many honors include a 2007 Journal of Nuclear Medicine Scientific Paper of the Year Award as well as a 2006 AuntMinnie Scientific Paper of the Year.

Awards and Honors: July 28, 2010

KamayaAya_100.gifAya Kamaya, MD, assistant professor of radiology (diagnostic), was selected as a finalist for the New Investigator Award at the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine in San Diego, CA, on March 25, 2010.

Since the completion of her fellowship in body imaging at Stanford in 2005, Dr. Kamaya has been a clinical instructor, clinical assistant professor, and assistant professor in the abdominal imaging section at Stanford. During this time, she was given two teaching awards for her outstanding contributions to resident education, compassionate patient care, and research. She is currently the associate fellowship director of the Stanford Body Imaging Fellowship.

Prior to coming to Stanford for her fellowship, she completed her residency in diagnostic radiology at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, where she was awarded the Executive Council Award from the American Roentgen Ray Society for her work on "Color Doppler Twinkling Artifact" and the Laurence A. Mack Research Award from the Society of Radiologists in Ultrasound for her work on "Linear Streak Artifact." She completed medical school at the University of Utah in her hometown of Salt Lake City. As an undergraduate, she double majored in engineering sciences and Asian Studies, securing her two bachelor's degrees at Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire. Her research interests include investigating new ultrasound technologies such as photoacoustic ultrasound, in conjunction with the Electrical Engineering Department at Stanford; liver imaging; and women's imaging. Outside of work, her favorite activities include skiing and snowboarding (her favorite ski resort is Snowbird, UT), as well as running, surfing, and traveling.


Awards and Honors: July 20, 2010

KamayaAya_100.gifAya Kamaya, MD, assistant professor of radiology (diagnostic), has received the Certificate of Merit Award for her research exhibit entitled “Recurrence in the Thyroidectomy Bed: Sonographic Findings" at the May 2010 American Roentgen Ray Society meeting in San Diego.

Since the completion of her fellowship in body imaging at Stanford in 2005, Dr. Kamaya has been a clinical instructor, clinical assistant professor, and assistant professor in the abdominal imaging section at Stanford. During this time, she was given two teaching awards for her outstanding contributions to resident education, compassionate patient care, and research. She is currently the associate fellowship director of the Stanford Body Imaging Fellowship.

Prior to coming to Stanford for her fellowship, she completed her residency in diagnostic radiology at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, where she was awarded the Executive Council Award from the American Roentgen Ray Society for her work on "Color Doppler Twinkling Artifact" and the Laurence A. Mack Research Award from the Society of Radiologists in Ultrasound for her work on "Linear Streak Artifact." She completed medical school at the University of Utah in her hometown of Salt Lake City. As an undergraduate, she double majored in engineering sciences and Asian Studies, securing her two bachelor's degrees at Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire. Her research interests include investigating new ultrasound technologies such as photoacoustic ultrasound, in conjunction with the Electrical Engineering Department at Stanford; liver imaging; and women's imaging. Outside of work, her favorite activities include skiing and snowboarding (her favorite ski resort is Snowbird, UT), as well as running, surfing, and traveling.

Awards and Honors: July 19, 2010

Christie Draper, PhD, radiology postdoctoral scholar in Dr. Gold's lab; Garry Gold, MD, associate professor (diagnostic radiology); and Andrew Quon, MD, assistant professor (nuclear medicine), received the Society of Nuclear Medicine's (SNM) Correlative Imaging Council/Walter Wolf Award for their abstract, "Correlation between MRI and NaF PET/CT in Patients with Patellofemoral Knee Pain" (Draper CE, Fredericson M, Besier TF, Beaupre GS, Delp SL, Gold GE, Quon A). According to the SNM website, "[t]he Walter Wolf Award is given to the best abstract presented in a clinical or research aspect of correlative imaging. The award was named in honor of Dr. Wolf who was president of the CIC from 1999 to 2005." Dr. Draper presented their award-winning abstract at the June 2010 Annual Meeting of the Society of Nuclear Medicine (SNM).

Draper_100.gifChristie received her BS in biomedical engineering from Case Western Reserve University and her MS and PhD in mechanical engineering from Stanford University. Her dissertation work involved developing techniques to accurately measure knee joint kinematics from real-time MRI. As a postdoctoral scholar in Radiology, her research focuses on evaluating the potential of using 18F NaF PET/CT to diagnose and understand the causes of knee pain. In 2009, she was awarded the Clinical Biomechanics Award at the American Society of Biomechanics Meeting for her work evaluating differences between weight-bearing and non-weight-bearing knee joint kinematics.

Gold01B.jpg
Garry E. Gold, MD, associate professor of radiology and (by courtesy) bioengineering and orthopedics at Stanford University, received a master's degree in electrical engineering from Stanford in 1988 and his MD from Stanford in 1992. Dr. Gold has authored over 90 journal articles, 250 abstracts, and 7 patents in MRI. He has been the principal investigator or a co-investigator on over 30 funded research projects, and he is the principal investigator on two NIH-funded projects to improve MR imaging of osteoarthritis and the use of real-time MRI for the study of biomechanics. The International Skeletal Society awarded Dr. Gold the President's Medal, and this is the sixth time he was been awarded the Lauterbur Award for the best MRI paper from the Society for Computed Body Tomography and Magnetic Resonance (SCBT/MR). Dr. Gold reviews manuscripts for 10 peer-reviewed journals, including the Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (JMRI) and the Journal of Magnetic Resonance in Medicine (MRM), and he is on the editorial board of several publications. At Stanford, Dr. Gold practices clinical musculoskeletal radiology, teaching medical students, residents, and fellows. He teaches courses in imaging physics and human anatomy for medical students and graduate students, and he was awarded the Kaiser Award for outstanding and innovative contributions to education. He also serves as an advisor and co-advisor for many engineering graduate students and postdoctoral fellows.

Quon_100.gifAndrew Quon, MD, is currently an assistant professor of radiology in the Division of Nuclear Medicine as well as the chief of the PET/CT Clinical Service. Prior to coming to Stanford, Dr. Quon was a clinical staff physician at the University of California, Los Angeles, Medical Center (UCLA). He earned his BA in biology from the University of California, Berkeley, (UCB) before entering medical school at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center. After receiving his MD, Dr. Quon went on to complete his residency in nuclear medicine at the University of California, Los Angeles, Medical Center (UCLA). His research projects include investigations into the use of translational imaging agents, such as 18F-5FU, 18F-FLT, and 18F-NaF. He has published over 40 peer-reviewed articles on his research. In addition to the Walter Wolf Award, Dr. Quon's many honors include a 2007 Journal of Nuclear Medicine Scientific Paper of the Year Award as well as a 2006 AuntMinnie Scientific Paper of the Year.


Awards and Honors II: July 12, 2010

grant_alex.jpgAlex Grant, MS, a graduate student in the Molecular Imaging Instrumentation Lab (MIIL), has received the Bio-X Graduate Student Fellowship. This 3-year fellowship will support his research designing and fabricating test electronics for novel radiation detection devices and experimental fiber-based optical processing setups for new positron emission tomography technology. To date, he has presented or published a total of 6 presentations and articles on his research.

Prior to beginning the Stanford Bioengineering PhD Program, Mr. Grant worked as a researcher at the Beckman Laser Institute and Medical Clinic at the University of California, Irvine, which is also where he received his BS in physics. In addition to the Bio-X Fellowship, he has received the UC Regents Scholarship and the Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship, both from UC Irvine. In his spare time, he can be found traveling, enjoying the beach, and playing bass.


Awards and Honors I: July 12, 2010

Lau.jpgFrances Lau, MS, a PhD candidate at Stanford, received the California Breast Cancer Research Program Dissertation Award . This award will fund her project designing a mixed-signal front-end integrated circuit with fast timing for positron emission tomography (PET) applications. She is also working on the development of hardware for a 1mm resolution breast cancer imaging PET system. For more information on these projects, see http://miil.stanford.edu.

To view her prior blog postings, please access "Awards and Honors II: December 5, 2008"; "Awards and Honors: December 17, 2007"; "Awards and Honors: August 2, 2007"; and "Awards and Honors: July 3, 2007."

Awards and Honors: July 8, 2010

Nnewihe_100.gifAnderson Nnewihe, MS, graduate student in the lab of Dr. Brian Hargreaves, has received the First Place Best Poster Award for his poster, "High Resolution Breast MRI," at the 2nd Annual Center for Biomedical Imaging at Stanford (CBIS) Symposium: “Imaging Inside Out: Biomedical Imaging from Atom to Adam" on April 22, 2010.

As a PhD candidate in the Stanford Department of Bioengineering, Anderson's research focuses on hardware design for the multinuclear imaging of the breast and the knee. In 2005, he graduated from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) with a BS degree in electrical engineering; in 2007, he received an MS degree in bioengineering at Stanford. His goals are to translate his research on multinuclear imaging to the clinical setting to expedite scans, improve image resolution, and facilitate diagnosis. He also has a marked interest in health care for his home country, Nigeria.

Please access his prior blog posting: "Awards and Honors: April 17, 2008."


Awards and Honors II: July 7, 2010

Hongguang-Simon-Liu_150.jpgHongguang Liu, PhD, a postdoctoral scholar in the Cancer Molecular Imaging Chemistry Laboratory (CMICL), was awarded a first place Molecular Imaging Center of Excellence (MICoE) Young Investigator Award for his abstract, "Noninvasive Molecular Imaging of Radioactive Tracers Using Optical Imaging Techniques" (G. Ren, Z. Miao, X. Zhang, X. Tang, P. Han, S.S. Gambhir, and Z. Cheng) presented at the Annual Meeting of the Society of Nuclear Medicine (SNM 2010) in Salt Lake City, UT.

At the SNM Annual Meeting press conference, his abstract was also selected as one of the the "top 5" research abstracts presented during the SNM meeting. Dr. Liu and his co-authors, Drs. G. Ren, Z. Miao, X. Zhang, X. Tang, P. Han, S.S. Gambhir, and Z. Cheng, recently published their paper, (based on the award-winning abstract) in PLoS ONE: ""Molecular Optical Imaging with Radioactive Probes" (Liu H, Ren G, Miao Z, Zhang X, Tang X, et al. (2010) "Molecular Optical Imaging with Radioactive Probes." PLoS ONE 5(3): e9470. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0009470).

Before becoming a postdoctoral scholar in the Cancer Molecular Imaging Chemistry Laboratory, Dr. Liu was a visiting instructor in the Laboratory. He received his PhD in molecular imaging and radiation medicine from the Institute of Radiation Medicine at the Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences in Peking Union Medical College. He also holds a Master of Science from the Department of Developmental Biology from China Medical University, Shenyang, Liaoning, PRC.

In his free time, Dr. Liu enjoys jogging, swimming, reading, and contemplation.

Awards and Honors I: July 7, 2010

Gang Ren, PhD; Rong Zhang; Zhe Liu, PhD; Jack M. Webster, PhD; Zheng Miao, PhD; Sam Gambhir, MD, PhD; Faisal A. Syud, PhD; and Zhen Cheng, PhD, have received a Best Basic Science Paper Award from The Journal of Nuclear Medicine (JNM) for their article entitled "A 2-Helix Small Protein Labeled with 68Ga for PET Imaging of HER2 Expression" (2009;50(9):1492-1499). Their paper was one of three basic science papers chosen for the 2009 award, which was presented to them at the 2010 Society of Nuclear Medicine Annual Meeting in Salt Lake City, UT.

Drs. Ren, Liu, and Miao, are members of the Cancer Molecular Imaging Chemistry Laboratory (CMICL), which is directed by Dr. Cheng and part of the Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford (MIPS) directed by Dr. Gambhir. Drs. Zhang, Webster, and Syud are their collaborators at GE Global Research.

Awards and Honors II: July 6, 2010

pratx.gifGuillem Pratx, PhD, postdoctoral scholar in the Image-Guided Intervention Laboratory, has been awarded two honors: a Dean's Postdoctoral Fellowship and an American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) Research Seed Grant. Dr. Pratx will use his Fellowship and Grant to support his research in X-ray luminescence computed tomography.

Dr. Pratx completed his undergraduate work in engineering at the Ecole Centrale in Paris, France. At Stanford, his dissertation research focused on the development of practical algorithms that exploit graphics processing units (GPU) for fast medical image reconstruction in ultra-high resolution PET systems under development at the University. To read more, please access his personal webpage: http://www.stanford.edu/~pratx/. Please also see Dr. Pratx's earlier award postings by accessing "Awards and Honors I: September 23, 2009"; "Awards and Honors: August 2, 2007"; " Awards and Honors: December 17, 2007"; "Awards and Honors II: December 5, 2008"; and "Awards and Honors II: July 18, 2008."




Awards and Honors I: July 6, 2010

Hackel_Photo_-_High[1]_150.gifBenjamin Hackel, PhD, postdoctoral scholar in the Multimodality Molecular Imaging Laboratory (MMIL) and member of the Canary Center for Cancer Early Detection, has been awarded the American Cancer Society/Canary Foundation Early Detection of Cancer Postdoctoral Fellowship for his research on the development of molecular imaging agents for early cancer detection. Under the direction of Dr. Sam Gambhir, Dr. Hackel is investigating the integration of novel protein scaffolds with both traditional and emerging imaging modalities to reduce the limits of tumor detection.

Prior to joining the MMIL, Dr.Hackel received his PhD in chemical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Cambridge, MA. He has published eight articles in his field of research and his past awards include the National Defense Science and Engineering Graduate Fellowship and the National Science Foundation Graduate Fellowship.

Awards and Honors: July 1, 2010

Andrew_Lee_Profile_Picture_150.jpgAndrew Lee, Stanford medical student in the Cardiovascular Gene and Cell Therapy Laboratory (CGCT), has received a three- year Bio-X Graduate Student Fellowship Award. Andrew will use his award starting the fall of 2010 to enter the Chemical and Systems Biology PhD Program, where he will collaborate with the laboratory of Dr. Paul Wender in the Department of Chemistry to develop a novel molecular transporter and nanoparticle hybrid complex to improve stem cell survival following transplantation into the ischemic myocardium. Using noninvasive molecular imaging, Andrew and his collaborators will assess the engraftment, migration, and fate of cells delivered into the myocardium with this complex.

As an undergraduate at Yale University, Andrew conducted research on measuring indices of asynchrony in the left ventricular myocardial contraction of patients in heart failure using cardiac MRI. After graduating with a BS in East Asian Studies and biology, he entered medical school at Stanford University, hoping to learn about alternative therapies for treating ischemic heart disease. Currently finishing his third year of medical school, Andrew is working with Dr. Joseph Wu to use noninvasive molecular imaging to monitor cell engraftment and survival following therapeutic delivery to the heart. In the future, he hopes to apply these imaging technologies to human clinical stem cell trials. Andrew's other research interests include developing novel methods of imaging and treating tumors derived from pluripotent stem cells as well as creating innovative methods of inducing pluripotency in adult somatic cells.

In the past, Andrew's research has been supported by the Stanford Medical Scholars Research Program, the American Heart Association, and the Howard Hughes Medical Institution. He is currently supported by a Radiological Society of North America Medical Student Grant. He has published over 13 peer reviewed journal articles on the topics of molecular imaging of stem cells and induction of pluripotency while at Stanford. His other activities include volunteering at the Stanford Medical School Pacific Free Clinic (PFC), where he was a former student manager.

Please view his prior blog posting: "Awards and Honors: April 5, 2010."

Awards and Honors II: June 29, 2010

RakowPenner_100.jpgRebecca Rakow-Penner, MD/PhD candidate in biophysics and graduate student in the Radiological Sciences Laboratory, has been honored with the 2010 Norman Blank Award for the outstanding medical student in radiology. The award was created in memory of longtime faculty member and Director of Admissions Norman Blank, MD.

In our Department, Rebecca has worked in the Radiological Sciences Laboratory with Dr. Gary Glover and with Dr. Bruce Daniel, where she has conducted extensive research for imaging vascular characteristics of tumors in breast cancer using blood oxygen level sensitive MRI. She has also served as a teaching assisant in Dr. Garry Gold's radiology 220 course, "Imaging Anatomy."

Before coming to Stanford, Rebecca received her MS in bioengineering from the California Institute of Technology and her SB in engineering with an emphasis on biomedicine from Harvard University. Currently, Rebecca is an MD/PhD student in biophysics, who will graduate from her PhD program this spring. She expects her MD degree in the spring of 2011.

As a graduate student at Stanford, Rebecca is developing unique MRI technology for breast imaging. She was recently a finalist for the Young Investigator Moore Award at the International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine (ISMRM) annual meeting held in Stockholm for her research on blood oxygen level dependent MRI in the breast. In addition to research, Rebecca enjoys teaching and has been a teaching assistant for four different classes; three of which were in the Department of Radiology. Her other numerous activities include serving as the president for the Radiology Interest Group at Stanford (RIGS) and working as a legislative ambassador for the American Cancer Society of Northern California, which involves meeting with legislators to encourage them to support cancer research funding.

Please access her prior blog posting at "Awards and Honors I: January 29, 2010".

Awards and Honors I: June 29, 2010

Iagaru_09_100.pngAndrei Iagaru, MD, instructor of Nuclear Medicine, has earned the 2009 Alavi/Mandell Award for his article entitled "A Novel Strategy for a Cocktail 18F Fluoride and 18F FDG PET/CT Scan for Evaluation of Malignancy: Results of the Pilot Phase Study" published in The Journal of Nuclear Medicine. He received his award at the 2010 Society of Nuclear Medicine (SNM) Annual Meeting in Salt Lake City, UT. This is the third year in a row that Dr Iagaru has received this award.

Andrei Iagaru, MD, completed medical school at the Carol Davila University of Medicine, Bucharest, Romania, and an internship at Drexel University College of Medicine, Graduate Hospital, in the Department of Medicine. He began his residency at the University of Southern California (USC) Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles, in the Division of Nuclear Medicine, where he was the chief resident. He finished his residency and completed a PET/CT fellowship at Stanford University's School of Medicine in the Division of Nuclear Medicine. He is currently an instructor in the Department of Radiology where his research interests include whole-body MRI and PET/CT for early cancer detection; radioimmunotherapy; optical imaging of breast cancer; clinical translation of novel PET radiopharmaceuticals; and PET/CT imaging for thyroid/breast cancers, melanoma, lymphoma, and sarcoma.

Please see his other award postings: "Awards and Honors: March 15, 2010"; "Awards and Honors: July 17, 2009"; "Awards and Honors: May 26, 2009"; and "Awards and Honors I: July 15, 2008".

Awards and Honors: June 24, 2010

Shijun_Hu[1]_100.gifShijun Hu, PhD, postdoctoral fellow in the Cardiovascular Gene and Cell Therapy (CGCT) Laboratory, has received a two-year American Heart Association Postdoctoral Fellowship Award for his research on the transplantation and imaging of novel cardiac stem cell therapy. His project investigates the safety and efficacy of novel iPSC-derived cardiomyocytes (iPSC-CMs) and their therapeutic potential for the treatment of cardiovascular disease, which is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in U.S. Dr. Hu's work will help drive major innovations in treating human cardiovascular disease in the twenty-first century.

The American Heart Association Postdoctoral Fellowship Award is designed to assist trainees "to initiate careers in cardiovascular and stroke research while obtaining significant research results under the supervision of a sponsor or mentor." Prior to coming to Stanford, Dr. Hu completed his PhD in developmental biology at Northeast Agricultural University in China. His other accolades include 11 peer-reviewed publications and several awards, including the 2009 Young Investigator Award from the Stanford School of Medicine's Cardiovascular Institute.


Awards and Honors II: June 15, 2010

BasuChiefResident_200.jpgPat Basu, MD, MBA, attending physician, has been selected out of 1,000 applicants as a national finalist for the prestigious 2010-2011 White House Fellowship Program.

As one of twenty-five finalists, Pat will be interviewed mid-June in Washington D.C. by several high-profile individuals, including Tom Brokow and General Wesley Clark. If selected for the Program, Pat will have the opportunity "to work for a year as a full-time, paid Fellow to senior White House staff, Cabinet Secretaries, and other top-ranking government officials. Fellows also participate in an education program that includes roundtable discussions with renowned leaders from the private and public sectors, and trips to study U.S. policy in action both domestically and internationally."

Pat is a board certified radiologist who recently accepted a faculty appointment in the Department of Radiology, where he was previously a chief resident. In addition to his clinical duties, Pat's academic responsibilities include enhancing outpatient imaging operations and patient care quality as well as conducting research pertaining to healthcare costs, access, and quality. He has been invited to speak on these issues nationally and internationally. In addition, Pat serves as director of the "Health Economics, Finance, and Policy" course offered to Stanford physicians and medical students. He also directs the STARS Luncheon Program, a nonprofit designed to support lower socioeconomic children for future college and career success.

Prior to coming to Stanford, Pat served as chief resident during his intern year at Resurrection Hospital in Chicago. He graduated with honors from the University of Chicago, earning his MD and MBA degrees. While attending the University of Chicago, Pat served in the highest leadership roles as president of his business school cohort and as the representative for his medical school class on the Dean’s Council. He also led the Adolescent Substance Abuse Program. As an undergraduate, Pat attended the University of Illinois on a National Merit Scholarship, where he graduated with honors in mechanical engineering and served on the University senate.

Please access his prior blog postings "Medical Imaging: The Good, the Bad & the Ugly"; "Chief Resident Pat Basu Named Consultant of the Year"; "The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly" in Imaging: Radio Interview by Dr. Pat Basu"; "Dr. Basu Completes the 2008 J.T. Rutherford Government Relations Fellowship"; Awards and Honors II: July 15, 2008; Awards and Honors: February 2007; Awards and Honors: August 13, 2007; and "Our New Chief Residents for 2008-2009."

Awards and Honors I: June 15, 2010

RBitton[1].gif_150.gifRachel Bitton, PhD, postdoctoral scholar in the Radiological Sciences Laboratory (RSL), has been awarded a two-year California Breast Cancer Research Grant from the California Breast Cancer Research Program to fund her research on MRI-guided focused ultrasound in breast cancer treatment.

Dr. Bitton received her PhD in biomedical engineering from the University of Southern California, Los Angeles, (USC) after completing her dissertation entitled “A High Frequency Array-Based Photoacoustic Microscopy Imaging System.” As a National Cancer Institute Postdoctoral Fellow at the RSL, her research focuses on developing interventional techniques in MR image-guided high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablation using MR PRF thermometry monitoring for novel applications in breast cancer therapy at 3T, including MRgHIFU for preoperative localization of non-palpable breast tumors in place of wire localization. Dr. Bitton is also fostering new techniques in MR acoustic radiation force imaging (MR-ARFI) in the breast, and she is creating HIFU simulation models and treatment strategies in the presence of brain calcifications during MR-HIFU functional neurosurgery.

Dr. Bitton has published 12 articles and proceedings on her research. In addition to the California Breast Cancer Research Grant, she has received a 2010 International Society of Magnetic Resonance in Medicine (ISMRM) Student Stipend as well as a 2009 ISMRM New Entrant Stipend in recognition of her research. While working as a postdoctoral scholar at Stanford, Dr. Bitton also serves as a consultant with Ocubell in Palo Alto, where she is helping to design and develop an opthalmic photoacoustic imaging system for applications in retinal disease. When she is not working, she enjoys hiking, live music, and Stanford's aerial fabrics course.

Awards and Honors: June 11, 2010

Vasanawala_100.gifDr. Shreyas Vasanawala, assistant professor of radiology, received the GE Healthcare 2010 Thought Leader Award for innovation in pediatric MRI at the Annual Meeting of the International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine (ISMRM) in Stockholm, Sweden on May 7th, 2010.

Dr. Vasanawala joined the Department of Radiology faculty in July of 2007, after receiving his degree and a PhD in biophysics from Stanford University, followed by residency training in radiology at Stanford University Medical Center and a pediatric radiology fellowship at Lucile Packard Children's Hospital (LPCH). During his fellowship, Dr. Vasanawala received specialty training in pediatric musculoskeletal imaging at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center and in pediatric cardiovascular imaging at Sick Kids in Toronto. At Stanford, Dr. Vasanawala's research aims to improve magnetic resonance imaging techniques for evaluating pediatric disease.

To view Dr. Vasanawala’s prior postings, please see "In the News: Shreyas Vasanawala, MD"; "Awards and Honors II: February 19, 2010"; "Dr. Vasanawala and Colleagues Receive the Prestigious Caffey Award"; Awards and Honors: April 22, 2009; "Awards and Honors: March 23, 2009"; "Awards and Honors II: February 13, 2009"; "Awards and Honors I: July 11, 2008"; and "New Faculty Hires and Promotions: July 3, 2007."

Awards and Honors: May 19, 2010

Roland Bammer, PhD, Patrick Barnes, MD, Samantha Holdsworth, PhD, Stefan Skare, PhD, and Kristen Yeom, MD, were awarded the John Caffey Award for Best Basic Science Research Paper at the 2010 Society for Pediatric Radiology (SPR) annual meeting for their four research papers (please see them listed below), which describe new neuro MRI imaging applications to improve the healthcare of children. The design of these new neuroimaging MR techniques was only possible because of the infrastructure created by Dr. Bammer and his whole team, including Heiko Schmiedeskamp, MS; Matus Straka, PhD; Eun Soo Choi, MS; Murat Aksoy, PhD; Daniel Kopeinigg, PhD; and Didem Aksoy, PhD. Working together, this group is developing new techniques in pulse sequencing; case analysis; fiber tracking, and perfusion. Their high-quality data is ensuring that diagnostic radiologists make the best diagnosis. By successfully securing NIH funding for their work, they have created one of the largest pediatric research programs in the United States.


Paper #: PA43: "Clinical Evaluation of Readout-Segmented-EPI for Diffusion-Weighted Imaging." Roland Bammer, PhD, Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA; Samantha J Holdsworth, PhD;Stefan Skare, PhD; Kristen Yeom, MD; Patrick D Barnes, MD

Paper #: PA48: "High-Resolution Motion-Corrected Diffusion-Tensor Imaging (DTI) in Infants." Stefan T Skare, PhD, Stanford University, Stanford, CA; Samantha J Holdsworth, PhD; Kirsten Yeom, MD; Patrick D Barnes, MD; Roland Bammer, PhD

Paper #: PA51: "3D SAP-EPI in Motion-Corrected Fast Susceptibility Weighted Imaging (SWI)." Roland Bammer, PhD, Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA; Samantha J Holdsworth, PhD; Stefan Skare, PhD; Kristen Yeom, MD; Patrick D Barnes, MD

Paper #: PA53: "T1-Weighted 3D SAP-EPI for Use in Pediatric Imaging." Roland Bammer, PhD, Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA; Samantha J Holdsworth, PhD; Stefan Skare, PhD; Kristen Yeom, MD; Patrick D Barnes, MD

Awards and Honors: April 26, 2010

HsiaoAlbert2010_150.jpgAlbert Hsiao, MD, PhD, received the John Kirkpatrick Young Investigator Award for the best scientific research paper presented by a resident or fellow for his article, “Volumetric Flow Assessment in Congenital Heart Disease with 4D Flow MRI," developed in collaboration with Marcus Alley, PhD; Payam Massaband, MD; Robert J. Herfkens, MD; Frandics P. Chan, MD, PhD; and Dr. Shreyas Vasanawala. Dr. Hsiao's research promises to translate quickly into the clinical environment for imaging children with cardiovascular disease.

Dr. Hsiao studied biology, computer science, and engineering at Caltech as an undergraduate and returned home for medical school at the University of California, San Diego, where he completed a PhD program in bioengineering with an emphasis in bioinformatics. After completing a year of general surgery internship at Stanford, he joined our Department as a first-year resident in 2008. Now in his second year of our Residency Program, Dr. Hsiao works primarily with Drs. Vasanawala, Chan, and Herfkens to develop practical clinical applications for 4D flow MRI. In their evaluations of patients in clinical practice so far, their results show that the 4D flow technique they have developed is more precise than conventional phase-contrast in quantifying flow. These results are of particular significance because the 4D flow technique can provide much more information about overall blood flow in the heart and lungs than conventional methods.

When he's not working, Dr. Hsiao enjoys training in martial arts and playing tennis. For his prior blog posting, please see "Welcome New Residents."

Awards and Honors: April 21, 2010

Ware_0118-72.jpgNancy Ware, ARRT (CT), has received one of two FY 2010 “Most Productive Technologist Awards” from the Stanford 3D Laboratory. Ms. Ware grew up in Redwood City, California, and graduated from Canada College. Before coming to our Department, she worked as the lead CT technologist at Alexian Brothers Hospital for 25 years. In March of 2008, she joined our 3D Laboratory. Outside of work, she enjoys bicycling, traveling, and hiking.

Awards and Honors: April 19, 2010

Sandra Rodriguez_2009.jpgSandra Rodriguez, BS R(RT)(MR), MR research technologist, has received the Professional Advancement Scholarship from the American Society of Radiologic Technologists (ASRT) Education and Research Foundation. According to the website, the ASRT is "committed to advancing the radiologic sciences and promoting the professionalism of radiologic technologists." The Professional Advancement Scholarship is awarded to radiologic technologists to assist them in completing an undergraduate or graduate degree in the radiologic sciences.

Ms. Rodriguez earned her Bachelor of Science in Health Administration (BSHA) in an online program through the University of Phoenix in September of 2008. She is currently enrolled in the Master's Program in Health Administration and will receive her degree in November 2010. As an MRI technologist at the Lucas Center, Ms. Rodriguez helps users set-up for their studies and facilitates their scans, providing support whenever necessary. She also does quality assurance on our three scanners and makes sure they are running smoothly. In her free time, Ms. Rodriguez enjoys cardio kickboxing; reading; and trying to keep up with a teenage girl (her daughter).

For her prior awards listings, please access Awards and Honors: February 19, 2010; Awards and Honors: August 11, 2009; and Awards and Honors: April 9, 2008.

Awards and Honors: April 7, 2010

Soriano_James_150.jpgJames Soriano, RT, (R) (CT), is a registered CT technologist, and our most recent recipient of the Wingspread Award. He came to Stanford in 2005 and worked as a diagnostic radiology technologist. Within a year, he transferred to the CT Department for cross training, where he now works as a full-time CT technologist. James received the Wingspread Award because of his excellence in Radiology. Bestowed upon James by the former recipient, Audrey Strain, RT (R) (CT), the Wingspread Award gives employees the opportunity to recognize who among them has gone above and beyond the fulfillment of his or her usual duties in patient care, job performance, versatility, and work ethics. Wingspread awardees can keep the award for as long as they wish or until they discover another "special performer."

Before coming to Stanford, James worked as a traveling radiologic technologist at different trauma hospitals in the country. He earned his associate of science degree in medical imaging from Long Beach City College in 2002, graduating as the "Student of the Year" in his class. He completed his bachelor of science degree in medical imaging from Grand Canyon University in 2009 and will be participating in the commencement ceremony this May in Phoenix, Arizona.

When asked what he likes about his work, James described his experience as
follows: "The opportunities here are endless. Stanford Hospital gives everyone lots of opportunities to grow and advance in their careers. There are so many avenues here that we can venture into and still continue to learn."

In his free time, James participates annually in different charitable organizations. He runs 20 miles per week and is actively involved with the San Francisco and Los Angeles AIDS Walk; the Lance Armstrong Cancer Foundation; as well as the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society. James is currently training for an annual half marathon that he will be participating in later this year.

Awards and Honors: April 5, 2010

Andrew_Lee_Profile_Picture_150.jpgAndrew Lee, Stanford medical student in the Cardiovascular Gene and Cell Therapy Laboratory, was awarded a Research Medical Student Grant by the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) for this coming summer. This grant is designed to help medical students increase their "research experience in medical imaging and to encourage them to consider academic radiology as an important option for their future." Mr. Lee will use his RSNA grant award to support his research using

PET/CT to investigate the fate of human cardiac progenitor cells following their delivery into the ischemic myocardium of an animal model.

As an undergraduate at Yale University, Mr. Lee conducted research on measuring indices of asynchrony in the left ventricular myocardial contraction of patients in heart failure using cardiac MRI. After graduating with a BS in East Asian Studies and biology, he entered medical school at Stanford University, hoping to learn about alternative therapies for treating ischemic heart disease. Currently in his third year, Mr. Lee is working with Dr. Joseph Wu to use noninvasive molecular imaging to monitor cell engraftment and survival following therapeutic delivery to the heart. In the future, he hopes to employ the imaging technologies he is helping to develop in human clinical stem cell trials. Andrew's other research interests include collaborations with the Longaker laboratory on developing novel methods of reprogramming adipose tissue to become pluriopotent stem cells without the use of lentiviral vectors.

In the past, Mr. Lee's research has been supported by the Stanford Medical Scholars Research Program and the American Heart Association. He is currently supported by the Howard Hughes Medical Institution. He has published over 10 peer reviewed journal articles in the past 2 years. His other activities include volunteering at the Stanford Medical School Pacific Free Clinic (PFC), where he was a former manager.

Awards and Honors: April 1, 2010

EricOlcott_100.jpgEric Olcott, MD, associate professor of radiology and chief of diagnostic radiology at the Palo Alto Veterans Administration Hospital, received the Senior Faculty of the Year Award, 2008-2009, from the Stanford Department of Radiology for recognition of his outstanding contributions to resident education, compassionate patient care, and research.

Beginning his collegiate career at Stanford, Dr. Olcott earned his BS with distinction in biological sciences and attended Stanford University School of Medicine, graduating with commendations in immunology and medical microbiology. He completed an internship in internal medicine at the Presbyterian Hospital of Pacific Medical Center in San Francisco and went on to fulfill his residency in diagnostic radiology as well as fellowships in CT/ultrasound and interventional radiology at the University of California, San Francisco. Prior to coming to Stanford in 1993 as an acting assistant professor, Dr. Olcott was an assistant professor at the University of California, San Francisco.

The Senior Faculty of the Year Award, 2008-2009, is one of a long list of awards he has received, which include 1) the 2003 Cum Laude Award from the Society of Computed Body Tomography and Magnetic Resonance (SCBT/MR) Twenty-Sixth Annual Course for his research in collaboration with Drs. Chow and Sommer, "Clinical Utility of Double-Bolus Multidetector-Row CT Urography with Sliding Thin-Slab MIP" and 2) the 1999 Radiology Editor’s Recognition Award for Reviewing with Special Distinction (presented to 31 of 995 reviewers).

In addition to serving on numerous hospital and University committees at Stanford and UCSF, Dr. Olcott has published 4 book chapters and over 40 peer-reviewed articles. His current research and clinical focus is on body imaging utilizing CT, ultrasound, and MRI; magnetic resonance angiography; imaging of trauma; and CT angiography.


Awards and Honors: March 30, 2010

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Juergen K. Willmann, MD, assistant professor of radiology (abdominal imaging) and head of the Translational Molecular Imaging Laboratory, has received the 2010 Roscoe E. Miller Best Paper Award at the annual meeting of the Society of Gastrointestinal Radiology in Orlando, Florida, for a project entitled "Monitoring Anti-Angiogenic Therapy in Colon Cancer With Molecular Ultrasound and a Novel Clinically Translatable Ultrasound Contrast Agent" (authors: MA Pysz, K Foygel, J Rosenberg, SS Gambhir, M Schneider, JK Willmann).

Dr. Willmann joined the Stanford Radiology faculty in 2008 as an assistant professor of radiology in the Abdominal Imaging Section and as a member of the Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford (MIPS). Dr. Willmann received his MD degree in 1998 from the Albert-Ludwigs-University Freiburg, Germany. Following his residency in diagnostic radiology at the University Hospital of Zurich, Dr. Willmann was assistant professor of radiology at the University of Zurich between 2003 and 2008, and received tenure in 2005. Between 2006 and 2008, Dr. Willmann also performed a dedicated molecular imaging research fellowship under the mentorship of Dr. Sanjiv Sam Gambhir.

Dr. Willmann is the PI of the Translational Molecular Imaging Lab at Stanford, which focuses on the development, testing, and clinical translation of novel molecular and functional imaging strategies for the early detection of cancer, monitoring of cancer therapy, and quantification of inflammation. When he is not working, Dr. Willmann enjoys his life as a new Dad and plays the piano.

To read Dr. Willmann's prior award postings, please access
http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2010/02/awards-and-hono-123.html;
http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2009/06/awards-and-hono-94.html; http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2009/04/awards_and_hono_79.html; http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2009/01/awards_and_hono_73.html; http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2008/11/awards_and_hono_61.html; http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2008/05/awards_and_hono_38.html; http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2007/12/awards_and_hono_21.html; and
http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2007/02/awards_and_hono_18.html.

Awards and Honors: March 29, 2010

Fan_Minogue.jpgHua Fan-Minogue, MD, PhD, Stanford Molecular Imaging Scholars Program (SMIS) Fellow in the Multimodality Molecular Imaging Lab, has been selected to receive an American Association for Cancer Research (AACR)-Merck Scholar-in-Training Award at the AACR 101st Annual Meeting 2010. With Scholar-in-Training Awards presented to fewer than 10% of applicants, the overall process is highly competitive. The AACR-Merck Scholar-in-Training Award is sponsored by Merck to support young investigators who will be presenting innovative papers at the AACR annual meeting.

Dr. Fan-Minogue's research in Dr. Sam Gambhir's laboratory focuses on developing novel bioluminescent imaging sensors to detect and monitor key cell signaling pathways involved in disease progression and tumor development. These sensors are genetically encoded imaging reporters, which can be introduced into cells and transgenic animals to spy on disease and cancers noninvasively, dynamically, and repetitively. These sensors provide insight into cancer-specific molecular machinery within the context of the whole animal. Dr. Fan-Minogue received her MD at the Peking Union Medical College in China and her PhD in cell biology and microbiology at the University of Alabama at Birmingham.

For her prior award, please see: "Awards and Honors: January 6, 2010."

Awards and Honors: March 26, 2010

Vilalta.jpgMarta Vilalta, PhD, postdoctoral scholar in the Imaging Radiobiology Laboratory, received a two-year postdoctoral fellowship from the Agència de Gestió d'ajuts Universitaris i de Recerca (AGAUR) of the Generalitat of Catalunya for her research project, "Evaluation of Combined Radiation and Anti-HIF Therapies for Cancer Using Novel Preclinical Imaging and Radiotherapy Tools." The goal of her research is the development of a preclinical model for studying the combined therapies in vivo using non-invasive imaging methods to evaluate a clinically relevant treatment strategy.

Dr. Vilalta joined Dr. Graves' lab after completing her PhD at the University of Barcelona. Her doctoral work investigated the in vivo behavior and functionality of mesenchymal stem cells as vehicles for gene therapy of tumors and for tissue regeneration using bioluminescence imaging. Dr. Vilalta's work at Stanford is focused on the development of a preclinical model for studying radiotherapy and anti-HIF therapies. New to the United States, she spends much of her free time trying to see as much of the U.S. as possible.

Awards and Honors: March 24, 2010

Carr_100.jpgStephanie Carr, Stanford medical student, has been awarded the Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) Foundation Dr. Constantin Cope Medical Student Annual Scientific Meeting Research Award. Ms. Carr was one of only three medical students nationally to receive this award in recognition for her high-quality abstract "that best honors the spirit of inventiveness and scientific purity." She presented her work, "Common Iliac Vein Diameter and Risk of Deep Venous Thrombosis," at the 2010 SIR 35th Annual Scientific Meeting in Tampa, Florida.

Ms. Carr is currently a second-year medical student at Stanford where she conducts research under the direction of Chief of Cardiovascular/Interventional Radiology Lawrence Hofmann, MD. Supported by a Stanford Medical Scholars Research Program Fellowship, Ms. Carr is working on projects that focus on deep venous thrombosis and stenting in the lower extremities. Her interest in vascular pathology led to her curiosity regarding interventional radiology and the innovative uses of imaging and minimally invasive procedures to treat patients with a wide variety of pathology. Her long-term goal is to become an interventional radiologist at an academic medical center, so that she can contribute to the field through her clinical practice, research, and teaching.

Awards and Honors: March 18, 2010

Balchandani_150.jpgPriti Balchandani, PhD, postdoctoral scholar in the Radiological Sciences Laboratory (RSL), has been selected as a 2010 Junior Fellow by the International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine (ISMRM). She received this honor because of her commitment to the ISMRM; her publication history; and her
selection as a presenter at the upcoming ISMRM-European Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine and Biology (ESMRMB) Joint Annual Meeting in Stockholm, May 1-7, 2010.

Dr. Balchandani's research is focused on novel RF pulse and pulse sequence design for human MR imaging and spectroscopy. She is particularly interested in harnessing the power of high-field MR magnets to visualize the brain in unprecedented detail. Her work on overcoming some of the main limitations of operating at high magnetic fields has resulted in several first authored publications as well as patent applications and selection as a finalist for the ISMRM 2008 Young Investigator Award. Dr. Balchandani received her BS in computer engineering at the University of Waterloo and her PhD in electrical engineering at Stanford University.

Awards and Honors: March 15, 2010

Iagaru_09_100.png Andrei Iagaru, MD, instructor of nuclear medicine, has earned the Normal D. Poe Memorial Scholarship Award for the "most outstanding abstract" at the physician/scientist level in the field of Nuclear Medicine. He received the award at the 34th Western Regional Society of Nuclear Medicine Annual Meeting in Monterey, CA, on October 30, 2009.

Andrei Iagaru, MD, completed medical school at the Carol Davila University of Medicine, Bucharest, Romania, and an internship at Drexel University College of Medicine, Graduate Hospital, in the Department of Medicine. He began his residency at the University of Southern California (USC) Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles, in the Division of Nuclear Medicine, where he was the chief resident. He finished his residency and completed a PET/CT fellowship at Stanford University's School of Medicine in the Division of Nuclear Medicine. He is currently an Instructor in the Department of Radiology and his current research interests include whole-Body MRI and PET/CT for early cancer detection; Zevalin/Bexxar radioimmunotherapy; optical imaging of breast cancer; clinical translation of novel PET radiopharmaceuticals; and PET-CT imaging for thyroid/breast cancers, melanoma, lymphoma, and sarcoma.

Please see his other award postings: Awards and Honors: July 17, 2009; Awards and Honors: May 26, 2009; and Awards and Honors I: July 15, 2008.

Awards and Honors II: March 10, 2010

Federle_100.gifMichael Federle, MD, associate chair for education and professor of radiology, was recently honored with the 2010 Society of Gastrointestinal Radiologists (SGR) Walter B. Cannon Medal Award, which is bestowed annually upon a distinguished gastrointestinal radiologist. Dr. Federle received this accolade for his sustained achievement over the course of his career. He was honored with his medal award at the 2010 Abdominal Radiology Course (ARC) Meeting in Orlando, Florida, on February 21-26, 2010.

As the associate chair for education, Dr. Federle’s focus is on teaching and instructing residents and radiologists in the latest internet-based materials for radiologic decision support and diagnosis. For the past ten years, he has focused on producing and authoring a series of textbooks and internet-based decision support tools through a company he co-founded, Amirsys. Dr. Federle’s training materials have proved to be very successful and are now used by more than 20,000 radiologists as well as by most U.S. residency programs, and they are beginning to spread to radiology programs worldwide. He is also working to integrate radiology into the medical student curriculum and creating products to teach physicians in other disciplines about radiologic principles.

Dr. Federle earned his undergraduate degree in biology at Marquette University in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and went on to graduate from medical school at Georgetown University in Washington, D.C. After finishing his internship in internal medicine at the University of Cincinnati Hospital in Ohio, he completed the radiology residency program at the University of Cincinnati. Prior to coming to our Department, he was the director of abdominal imaging for 16 of his 19 years at the University of Pittsburgh, where he also served as the chair of radiology as well as the chief of quality process and improvement. In addition to his Cannon Medal Award, Dr. Federle’s other awards include the 2007 Michael P. Federle Mentorship Award, which his residents at the University of Pittsburgh created in his honor. Besides his teaching, Dr. Federle's other accomplishments include 238 peer-reviewed journal articles and 17 books. When he is not in the office, he can probably be found on the Stanford Golf Course.

For his prior blog posting, please access “Stanford Radiology Welcomes Associate Chair for Education Michael Federle, MD."

Awards and Honors I: March 10, 2010

Iagaru_09_100.png Andrei Iagaru, MD, instructor of nuclear medicine, was honored with the Best Essay Award for his presentation on "Combined 18F NaF and 18F FDG PET/CT Scan for Evaluation of Malignancy: Beyond the Pilot Study" at the 2010 Society of Nuclear Medicine (SNM)/American College of Nuclear Medicine (ACNM) Mid-Winter Conference in Albuquerque, New Mexico.

Andrei Iagaru, MD, completed medical school at the Carol Davila University of Medicine, Bucharest, Romania, and an internship at Drexel University College of Medicine, Graduate Hospital, in the Department of Medicine. He began his residency at the University of Southern California (USC) Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles, in the Division of Nuclear Medicine, where he was the chief resident. He finished his residency and completed a PET/CT fellowship at Stanford University's School of Medicine in the Division of Nuclear Medicine. He is currently an Instructor in the Department of Radiology and his current research interests include whole-Body MRI and PET/CT for early cancer detection; Zevalin/Bexxar radioimmunotherapy; optical imaging of breast cancer; clinical translation of novel PET radiopharmaceuticals; and PET-CT imaging for thyroid/breast cancers, melanoma, lymphoma, and sarcoma.

Please see his other award postings: Awards and Honors: July 17, 2009; Awards and Honors: May 26, 2009; and Awards and Honors I: July 15, 2008.

Awards and Honors: March 3, 2010

Gary_Glover.jpgGary H. Glover, PhD, director of the Radiological Sciences Laboratory in the Richard M. Lucas Center for Imaging; professor of radiology and, by courtesy, of electrical engineering and of psychology, has received the Outstanding Achievement Award from his alma mater, the University of Minnesota. This award is the highest honor an alumnus can receive from the University of Minnesota, second only to an honorary degree. Dr. Glover earned his undergraduate and graduate degrees in electrical engineering from the University of Minnesota.

After working at GE’s Corporate Research and Development Center and at GE Medical Systems for more than 20 years, he joined the Department of Radiology at Stanford in 1990. Dr. Glover’s research focuses on the physics and mathematics of CT and MR imaging. Through his research, he has helped develop products that have greatly improved patient care.

He has published more than 300 scientific research articles and is named on approximately 50 patents. One of Dr. Glover's research interests was published in an article he coauthored entitled “Control Over Brain Activation and Pain Learned by Using Real-Time Functional MRI" in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA (PNAS) (2005 102:18626-18631; published online before print December 13, 2005, doi:10.1073/pnas.0505210102).

To access his prior blog postings, please see "The Laughing Subject"; Pain Research by Drs. Sean Mackey, Chris deCharms, Gary Glover, and Colleagues Featured in Nature"; and "Tsinghua University's "Oversea Expert," Dr. Gary Glover."

Awards and Honors: February 24, 2010

Willmann100120.jpg
Juergen K. Willmann, MD, assistant professor of radiology (abdominal imaging) and head of the Translational Molecular Imaging Laboratory, has received the 2009 Editor’s Recognition Award with Distinction from Radiology for the "high quality of [his] prompt, detailed, and scholarly reviews."

Dr. Willmann joined the Stanford Radiology faculty in 2008 as an assistant professor of radiology in the Body Imaging Section and as a member of the Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford (MIPS). Dr. Willmann received his MD degree in 1998 from the Albert-Ludwigs-University Freiburg, Germany. Following his residency in diagnostic radiology at the University Hospital of Zurich, Dr. Willmann was assistant professor of radiology at the University of Zurich between 2003 and 2008, and received tenure in 2005. Between 2006 and 2008, Dr. Willmann also performed a dedicated molecular imaging research fellowship under the mentorship of Dr. Sanjiv Sam Gambhir.

Dr. Willmann is the PI of the Translational Molecular Imaging Lab at Stanford, which focuses on the development, testing, and clinical translation of novel molecular and functional imaging strategies for the early detection of cancer, monitoring of cancer therapy, and quantification of inflammation. When he is not working, Dr. Willmann enjoys his life as a new Dad and plays the piano.

To read Dr. Willmann's prior award postings, please access http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2009/06/awards-and-hono-94.html; http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2009/04/awards_and_hono_79.html; http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2009/01/awards_and_hono_73.html; http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2008/11/awards_and_hono_61.html; http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2008/05/awards_and_hono_38.html; http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2007/12/awards_and_hono_21.html; and
http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2007/02/awards_and_hono_18.html.

Awards and Honors: February 22, 2010

hargreaves_100.gif Gold01B.jpg

   Drs. Hargreaves (L) and Gold (R)

Scott Delp, PhD, professor of bioengineering and mechanical engineering-biomechanical engineering; Garry Gold, MD, associate professor of radiology; Stuart Goodman, MD, professor of orthopaedic surgery; and Brian Hargreaves, PhD, assistant professor of radiology have been awarded a grant from the Wallace H. Coulter Translational Research Grant Program at Stanford for their project, “Improved MRI Around Metallic Implants.” The Coulter Research Grant Program is designed to bring together physicians and engineers to bridge “the gap between clinical needs and engineering solutions,” according to a recent Inside Stanford Medicine article entitled “Stanford-Coulter Program Awards Grants to Five Research Teams” (Feb. 8, 2010). This is Dr. Gold’s second grant from the Coulter Foundation.

Awards and Honors II: February 19, 2010

Vasanawala_100.gifDr. Shreyas Vasanawala has been awarded an R01 grant from the NIH for his project that aims to develop, integrate, and validate new kid-friendly methods to reduce the need for anesthesia in pediatric MRI.

Dr. Vasanawala joined the Department of Radiology faculty in July of 2007, after receiving his degree and a PhD in biophysics from Stanford University, followed by residency training in radiology at Stanford University Medical Center and a pediatric radiology fellowship at Lucile Packard Children's Hospital (LPCH). During his fellowship, Dr. Vasanawala received specialty training in pediatric musculoskeletal imaging at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center and in pediatric cardiovascular imaging at Sick Kids in Toronto. At Stanford, Dr. Vasanawala's research aims to improve magnetic resonance imaging techniques for evaluating pediatric disease.

Awards and Honors I: February 19, 2010

Sandra Rodriguez_2009.jpgSandra Rodriguez, BS R(RT)(MR), MR research technologist, has co-authored an abstract that was recently accepted for poster presentation at the 2010 Nineteenth Annual Meeting of the Society for Magnetic Resonance Technologists (SMRT), to be held in the Stockholm, Sweden, on May 1-2, 2010; the poster Tour and Reception will precede the meeting on April 30, 2010. The title of Ms. Rodriguez's abstract is "Breath Holding Improvements in DCE for Thoracic and Body Carcinoma" (A Hargreaves, MT Alley, J Park, AM Sawyer, G Glover, A Quon).

Ms. Rodriguez earned her Bachelor of Science in Health Administration (BSHA) in an online program through the University of Phoenix in September of 2008. She is currently enrolled in the Master's Program in Health Administration and will receive her degree in November 2010. As an MRI technologist at the Lucas Center, Ms. Rodriguez helps users set-up for their studies and facilitates their scans, providing support whenever necessary. She also does quality assurance on our three scanners and makes sure they are running smoothly. In her free time, Ms. Rodriguez enjoys cardio kickboxing; reading; and trying to keep up with a teenage girl (her daughter).

For her prior awards listings, please access http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2009/08/awards-and-hono-105.html and http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2008/04/awards-and-hono-35.html.

Awards and Honors II: January 29, 2010

geneser_100.jpgSarah Geneser, PhD, postdoctoral fellow in the Radiological Sciences Laboratory, has been awarded a Dean's Postdoctoral Fellowship from the Stanford School of Medicine, to model the impact of hormone replacement therapy on breast cancer risk and progression to better understand the physiological effects on breast tumor development. She is working with Dr. Sylvia Plevritis to investigate the impact of mammography screening and treatment on breast cancer incidence and survival. Dr. Geneser received her PhD in computer science from the University of Utah in 2008.

Awards and Honors I: January 29, 2010

RakowPenner_100.jpgRebecca Rakow-Penner, MD/PhD candidate in biophysics and graduate student in the Radiological Sciences Laboratory, has been selected as a finalist for the Young Investigators’ W.S. Moore Award in clinical science. Finalists will be given the honor of presenting their papers at the upcoming Joint Annual Meeting of the International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine-European Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine and Biology (ISMRM-ESMRMB), which will be held in Stockholm, Sweden, May 1-7, 2010. Ms. Rakow-Penner will give a presentation on her work entitled, "Detecting Blood Oxygen Level Dependent Contrast in the Breast." An article based on her research project is under consideration for publication by the Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

Before coming to Stanford, Ms. Rakow-Penner received her MS in bioengineering from the California Institute of Technology and her SB in engineering with an emphasis on biomedicine from Harvard University, where she also completed a senior honors thesis entitled "Design of Detector Coils for Improved Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Breast." As a graduate student at Stanford, Ms. Rakow-Penner is developing unique MRI technology for breast imaging. She has already published 4 articles and 11 peer-reviewed abstracts on her work. In addition, Ms. Rakow-Penner has received the California Breast Cancer Research Program Dissertation Award, ranking highest in her review section for this honor. Her other numerous activities include serving as the president for the Radiology Interest Group at Stanford and working as the legislative ambassador for the American Cancer Society of Northern California, which involves meeting with legislators to encourage them to support cancer research funding.

Awards and Honors: January 13, 2010

vandenbroucke_100_2010.jpgArne Vandenbroucke, PhD, postdoctoral scholar in the Molecular Imaging Instrumentation Lab, received a three-year postdoctoral fellowship from the Department of Defense (DOD) Breast Cancer Research Program (BCRP) of the Office of the Congressionally Directed Medical Research Programs for his research proposal entitled "Commissioning and Characterization of a Dedicated High-Resolution Breast PET Camera." The goal of the proposed project is to construct and to commission a PET camera, dedicated to breast imaging with a state-of-the art resolution of 1mm3. Additionally, the camera will employ a novel detection concept, yielding a better detection sensitivity and resulting in shorter patient scanning times. Such a camera could apply the benefits of PET imaging at an earlier stage in breast cancer management.

Dr. Vandenbroucke received his PhD in experimental particle physics from Gent University in Belgium. Before coming to Stanford, he worked on the HERMES experiment, researching the spin structure of the nucleon at the DESY (Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron or the "German Electron Synchrotron") in Hamburg, Germany. When he is not in the lab, he likes spending his time outdoors sailing, snowboarding, or traveling. For his prior blog postings, please access http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2008/12/awards-and-hono-66.html; http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2008/03/march-27-2008.html; and http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2007/12/awards_and_hono_23.html.

Awards and Honors: January 7, 2010

Ren_100.jpgYing Ren, MD, radiologist at Sheng Jing Hospital of China Medical University and postdoctoral scholar in the Translational Molecular Imaging Lab headed by Dr. Juergen Willmann, has received the 2010 Stanford Dean’s Fellowship for her research proposal entitled "Evaluation of Activity and Remission of Inflammatory Bowel Disease by Molecular Targeted Microbubble-Enhanced Ultrasound in a Mouse Colitis Model."

Dr. Ren received her MD from Peking Union Medical College, where she specialized in the early detection of pancreatic cancer using multiple imaging modalities. Her current research focuses on the multimodality molecular imaging of angiogenesis in tumor and inflammation, which will be helpful for the early detection of disease and the monitoring of treatment.

Awards and Honors: January 6, 2010

Fan_Minogue.jpgHua Fan-Minogue, MD, PhD, Stanford Molecular Imaging Scholars Program (SMIS) Fellow in the Multimodality Molecular Imaging Lab, was awarded a Travel Fellowship from the Helena Anna Henzl Gabor Young Women in Science Fund to attend the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) 101st Annual Meeting 2010. The Henzl-Gabor Travel Fellowships are awarded to postdoctoral scholars who have demonstrated a positive attitude through professional teamwork and collaborations with other scientists.

Dr. Fan-Minogue's research in Dr. Sam Gambhir's laboratory focuses on developing novel bioluminescent imaging sensors to detect and monitor key cell signaling pathways involved in disease progression and tumor development. These sensors are genetically encoded imaging reporters, which can be introduced into cells and transgenic animals to spy on disease and cancers noninvasively, dynamically, and repetitively. In collaboration with pediatricians and oncologists on campus, Dr. Fan-Minogue has applied these sensors to investigate insulin signaling in diabetic cardiomyopathy as well as oncogene signaling in tumorigenesis. These sensors provided insight into cancer-specific molecular machinery within the context of the whole animal. Dr. Fan-Minogue also aims to apply them to facilitate targeted cancer therapy and drug development.

Dr. Fan-Minogue received her medical training in Peking Union Medical College in China. She then obtained her PhD in microbiology and cell biology from the University of Alabama at Birmingham, where she investigated molecular mechanisms and performed the functional analysis of translation termination in eukaryotes in Dr. David Bedwell's laboratory. Featured in Molecular Cell, Dr. Fan-Minogue's work provided the scientific basis for developing drugs against genetic diseases caused by premature stop codon.

Awards and Honors: December 18, 2009

WangDavid_120.jpgDavid Wang, MD, fourth-year radiology resident, has won two awards: a Radiological Sciences of North America (RSNA) Travel Award for Young Investigators in Molecular Imaging and a World Molecular Imaging Conference Travel Stipend. David received these awards for his research on gene therapy using ultrasound and custom-made microbubbles, which serve as carrier vehicles for therapeutic delivery. He pursued this work in the laboratories of Drs. Juergen Willmann and Sanjiv Gambhir during a five-month sabbatical from his clinical training under the residency program's newly established research track. David's project was supported by a RSNA Research & Education Foundation/Toshiba America Medical Systems Research Resident Grant awarded to him last year.

Prior to residency, David received his medical degree from Stanford and was a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Fellow. As a medical student, he was the lead founder and first manager of Pacific Free Clinic, a volunteer-run health clinic that offers basic healthcare services to low-income immigrants in San Jose. The Clinic is currently in its sixth year of operation and has served thousands of patients. After residency, David plans to pursue a career in academic radiology.

For his prior blog posting, please access "Awards and Honors: June 12, 2008."

Awards and Honors: December 7, 2009

Norbert-Pelc_25.jpgNorbert Pelc, ScD, professor of radiology and bioengineering, has been elected to the position of Third Vice President of the Radiological Society of North America.

For his prior blog posting, please see "Awards and Honors: March 26, 2008."

Awards and Honors: November 24, 2009

Olcott_09.jpgPeter Olcott, graduate student in the Bioengineering Department and member of the Molecular Imaging Instrumentation Laboratory, has won two awards: 2009 IEEE Nuclear Science Symposium and Medical Imaging Conference (NSS/MIC) Best Student Paper Award and the 2009 Bio-X Stanford Interdisciplinary Graduate Fellowship (SIGF). Peter received the Best Student Paper Award for his article entitled "Cross-Strip Capacitive Multiplexing and Electro-Optical Coupling for Silicon Photomultiplier Arrays for PET Detectors."

He was granted the SIGF Award to pursue research aimed at greatly increasing the resolution of positron emission tomography (PET) through the use of novel photonic materials and devices. Peter stumbled upon this idea while working on a new PET detector that works inside an MRI scanner. He will try and merge extremely fast non-linear optics studied in the Applied Physics Department to the radiological problem of detecting the arrival time and location of a high-energy photon emitted in a positron annihilation. The PET/MRI project has brought him into close collaboration with Dr. Glover and a whole range of very helpful researchers and engineers in the Lucas Center. The Bio-X Stanford Interdisciplinary Graduate Fellowship (SIGF) was created by the Office of the Vice Provost for Graduate Education (VPGE) and the Graduate Fellowships Faculty Advisory Committee (GFFAC) for graduate students across the campus to pursue research across departments. Peter was one of 12 SIGF award recipients selected from an applicant pool of 171 students from 41 different departments.

Awards and Honors: November 23, 2009

Napel_9_150.gifSandy Napel, PhD, professor of radiology and, by courtesy, of medicine (medical informatics) and of electrical engineering as well as co-director of ISIS (Information Sciences in Imaging at Stanford) and the Radiology 3D Laboratory, has been elected to the College of Fellows of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering (AIMBE), which is comprised of the top 2% of medical and biological engineers. Since its founding in 1991, the AIMBE has been known as a leader in public policy issues affecting the medical and biological community.

Dr. Napel was elected Fellow of the AIMBE for his significant contributions to the field. He joins 950 other Fellows, who are also outstanding bioengineers in academia, industry, and government and who have also distinguished themselves through their contributions in research, industrial practice, and/or education.

Awards and Honors: November 10, 2009

GangRen.jpgGang (Tiger) Ren, MD, PhD, postdoctoral scholar in the Cancer Molecular Imaging Chemistry Laboratory (CMICL), has a recent research publication featured on MDLinx.com: "Melanin-Targeted Preclinical PET Imaging of Melanoma Metastasis" (J Nucl Med. 2009 Oct;50(10):1692-9. Epub 2009 Sep. 16).

Dr. Ren received his medical training from the Tongji University School of Medicine in Shanghai, China, and a PhD in advanced radiological sciences from the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas. Working primarily with Professor Zhen Cheng in the Cancer Molecular Imaging Chemistry Lab, he brings his expertise in small animal imaging using microSPECT and microPET to the In Vivo Cellular and Molecular Imaging Center at Stanford (ICMIC) Program. Dr. Ren's research centers on the development of different molecular probes, including both small molecules and peptides, to target specific tumor biomarkers such as the MC1R receptor; melanin contents in malignant melanoma; and HER2/EGFR in breast cancer. He has already successfully demonstrated the potential of the molecular probes ReCCMSH, Benzamide Analogs, and Affibody molecules in preclinical animal models using microPET. He continues to work on the development of new probes as well as a novel image-guided theragnostic scheme for the management of breast cancer and lung cancer.

Awards and Honors II: October 9, 2009

KimButtsPauly.jpgKim Butts Pauly, PhD, associate professor of radiology and of Bioengineering (by courtesy), was recently elected to the board of the International Society for Therapeutic Ultrasound (ISTU) for a period of three years. The ISTU is a non-profit organization "founded in 2001 to increase and diffuse knowledge of therapeutic ultrasound to the scientific and medical community, and to facilitate the translation of therapeutic ultrasound techniques into the clinical arena for the benefit of patients worldwide." Dr. Butts Pauly's current research interests are focused on image-guided minimally invasive therapies, including MR-guided high intensity focused ultrasound and MR-guided cryoablation. She has published her work in over 75 peer-reviewed publications. When Dr. Butts Pauly is not working, she enjoys gardening, traveling with her family, and reading with her kids.

Awards and Honors I: October 9, 2009

Wu_100100.jpgJoseph Wu, MD, PhD, assistant professor of medicine (cardiology) and radiology, was one of four Stanford scientists to receive a National Institutes of Health (NIH) Transformative R01 Award designed to "support exceptionally innovative, high risk, original and/or unconventional research projects that have the potential to create or overturn fundamental paradigms."

According to a recent Office of Communication & Public Affairs article, Dr. Wu's award will support his research regarding "ways to keep the body from rejecting human embryonic stem cells. For many years, researchers assumed that these undifferentiated building blocks would be ignored by the body's defense system. Wu's recent research in mice shows that this is not the case. 'It's getting harder and harder to believe that these cells are immunoprivileged,' said Wu. 'Now we need to know what to do about it.'" He will use his award to devise ways to "coax the immune system to tolerate the foreign cells, allowing them to regenerate or heal damaged tissues" (from "Stanford Nabs 13 Top NIH Awards for High-Stakes Research" by Krista Conger, Erin Digitale, Bruce Goldman, David Orenstein, Ruthann Richter, and Tracie White; download PDF at Stanford Nabs 13 Top NIH Awards for High-Stakes Research.pdf). To learn more about Dr. Wu's research, please access the Cardiovascular Gene and Cell Therapy Lab website at http://mips.stanford.edu/research/lab?lab%5fid=2883.

Awards and Honors: October 1, 2009

ArunG_150.gifArundhuti Ganguly, PhD, research associate in the Radiological Sciences Laboratory (RSL), received an NIH K99/R00 Pathway to Independence Award for her research proposal entitled "High Performance CMOS Based X-Ray Detector for C-Arm CT Imaging." The objective of this award is to "prepare qualified individuals for careers that have a significant impact on health-related research." Her proposal aims to improve image-guided interventions for the treatment of stroke by using a novel solid-state X-ray detector, which is based on CMOS technology that will allow faster imaging at an increased resolution. Dr. Ganguly plans to use the detector in conjunction with a conventional angiographic C-arm system to provide high frame rate projection images as well as 3D image volumes. Beginning in June of 2009, this grant will enable Dr. Ganguly to complete two years of mentored research with Professor Rebecca Fahrig, followed by three years of independent research.

Awards and Honors II: September 23, 2009

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Scott W. Atlas, MD, professor and chief of neuroradiology and senior fellow at both the Hoover Institution and Freeman-Spogli Institute for International Studies, has received an international honor on September 12, 2009, at the Annual Meeting of the Sociedade de Radiologia de Pernambuco in Recife, Brazil, for his "important contributions to radiology and to education in Brazil."

Dr. Atlas is recognized as a world leader in both education and clinical research and has been on the Nominating Committee for the Nobel Prize in Medicine and Physiology for several years. His research has centered on advanced applications of new MRI technologies in neurologic diseases, and he has authored more than 120 scientific publications in leading journals. Dr. Atlas is also the editor of the best-selling textbook Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Brain and Spine, which was recently released in its 4th edition and officially translated from English into Mandarin, Spanish, and Portuguese. He is also editor, associate editor, and an editorial board member of numerous scientific journals, and he has been a member of the boards of many major national and international scientific societies over the past decade. In recognition of his leadership in the field, Dr. Atlas has received many awards and honors. He has been named by his peers in The Best Doctors in America every year since its initial publication, as well as in regional listings, such as The Best Doctors in New York, Silicon Valley's Best Doctors, and other similar publications. He recently received the Alumni 2008 Comeback Award from his alma mater, the University of Illinois in Urbana-Champaign.

In addition, Dr. Atlas' work includes investigations into the effects of the changing healthcare marketplace on technology-based innovations in medicine, and he has lectured throughout the world on a variety of topics, most notably advances in MRI of the brain, and the key economic issues related to the future of such technology-based advances. During the 2008 Presidential Campaign, Dr. Atlas was a senior advisor for health care and the coordinator of the Health Policy Team for one of the major U.S. presidential candidates. At the Freeman-Spogli Institute for International Studies, he has particular interests in the evolving healthcare system of emerging economies, and he recently received a Fulbright Award to collaborate with Chinese academic leaders on structuring healthcare solutions for China. Dr. Atlas has also participated with leaders from government and academia on the World Bank's Commission on Growth and Development, and he is an adviser to major industry leaders in medical technology.

To read his prior blog articles, please access "Awards and Honors: March-April 2007"; "Awards and Honors: September 29, 2008"; "Sanford/Atlas: Alternatives to Government Health Takeover"; "Dr. Atlas' Commentary on Our Healthcare System Featured in The Washington Times"; and "Commentary by Dr. Atlas: 'Mr. Health Care: Ted Kennedy's Lifelong Passion' and 'Why Are These Health Care Fixes Ignored?'"

Awards and Honors I: September 23, 2009

pratx.gifGuillem Pratx, PhD, doctoral candidate in electrical engineering and member of the Molecular Imaging Instrumentation Laboratory, recently published an article in Physics in Medicine and Biology entitled "Bayesian Reconstruction of Photon Interaction Sequences for High-Resolution PET Detectors," which has been selected as a Featured Article by the editors of the Institute of Physics Journals. Dr. Pratx's article was chosen for its "novelty, high level of interest and potential impact on future research." To view his article, please access http://www.iop.org/EJ/abstract/-featured=jnl/0031-9155/54/17/001.

Dr. Pratx completed his undergraduate work in engineering at the Ecole Centrale in Paris, France. At Stanford (MIPS), he is completing his dissertation esearch, which centers on the development of practical algorithms hat exploit graphics processing units (GPU) for fast medical image reconstruction in ultra-high resolution PET systems under development at the University. For more details regarding his biography, please see Dr. Pratx's earlier award postings by accessing "Awards and Honors: August 2, 2007"; " Awards and Honors: December 17, 2007"; "Awards and Honors II: December 5, 2008"; and "Awards and Honors II: July 18, 2008."


Awards and Honors: August 11, 2009

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Sandra Rodriguez, BS R(RT)(MR), MR research technologist, has been awarded the UPS Foundation Scholarship from the Hispanic Scholarship Fund. This scholarship is awarded on a competitive basis to assist students, who have a minimum cumulative grade point average (GPA) of 3.0, in obtaining their educational objectives. Ms. Rodriguez earned her Bachelor of Science in Health Administration (BSHA) in an online program through the University of Phoenix in September of 2008. She is currently enrolled in the Master's Program in Health Administration and will receive her degree in November 2010. As an MRI technologist at the Lucas Center, Ms. Rodriguez helps users set-up for their studies and facilitates their scans, providing support whenever necessary. She also does quality assurance on our three scanners and makes sure they are running smoothly. In her free time, Ms. Rodriguez enjoys cardio kickboxing; reading; and trying to keep up with a teenage girl (her daughter).

For her prior awards listings, please access http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2008/04/awards_and_hono_35.html and http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2007/04/awards_and_hono_1.html.

Awards and Honors: July 28, 2009

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Avnesh S. Thakor, MA, MB Bchir, PhD, a visiting scholar in the Multimodality Molecular Imaging Lab, has been awarded an American Cancer Society International Fellowship for Beginning Investigators (ACSBI) from the International Union Against Cancer (UICC) for his research on Raman spectroscopy using SERS nanoparticles. One goal of ACSBI fellowships is to foster a bi-directional flow of research knowledge, experience, expertise, and innovation between countries. Dr. Thakor was awarded ACSBI fellowship for his research on Raman spectroscopy using SERS nanoparticles.

Dr. Thakor completed his PhD, in oxidative stress and vascular physiology, and his medical degree at the University of Cambridge. Currently, he is pursuing an MSc in cancer therapeutics at the University of London during his radiology residency. At Stanford, Dr. Thakor is applying his knowledge in oxidative stress and vascular biology to the molecular imaging of tumor biology. He has 20 published articles and over 30 peer-reviewed abstracts. In addition to the American Cancer Society International Fellowship, Dr. Thakor has received numerous other honors, including a 2009 European Association for Cancer Research Fellowship, 2008 British Institute of Radiology Philips Fellowship, and 2008 PEEL Medical Research Award.

Awards and Honors: July 24, 2009

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John Ronald, PhD, a post doctoral scholar in the Multimodality Molecular Imaging Lab (MMIL), has received a Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) Fellowship, which is a three-year award that provides support for highly qualified candidates to complete health research either in Canada or abroad. Dr. Ronald received the Fellowship for his proposal, "Multimodality Cell Trafficking Imaging Using Optical Bioluminescent Imaging, Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)."

Dr. Ronald received his BSc in physiology from the University of Western Ontario (UWO), graduating with honors. He remained at UWO to complete his MSc in anatomy and cell biology and his PhD thesis, "Magnetic Resonance Imaging Characterization of a Cholesterol-Fed Rabbit Model of Atherosclerosis and Alzheimer's Disease," in medical biophysics. Prior to coming to Stanford in June of 2009, Dr. Ronald was a postdoctoral scholar at the University of Western Ontario in anatomy and cell biology. As a member of the MMIL, Dr. Ronald researches new techniques for improving the ability to non-invasively track cells or cell products in various diseases, particularly atherosclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, and cancer.

The Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) Fellowship is just one of his many awards, which include the 2009 Canadian Governor General's Academic Gold Medal. He has also published over 10 peer-reviewed papers and more than 25 peer-reviewed abstracts.

In addition to his research, Dr. Ronald enjoys traveling, reading, poker, movies, golf, soccer, and rollerblading.

Awards and Honors: July 23, 2009

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Qizhen Cao, PhD, postdoctoral scholar in the Molecular Imaging Probe Laboratory, received a Travel Award to attend the 56th Society of Nuclear Medicine's Annual Meeting in Toronto, Canada from June 13th to June 17th, where she presented her study, "Phage Display Peptide Probes for Imaging Early Response to Antiangiogenic Treatment." Because her project demonstrates novel advances in molecular imaging, Dr. Cao's abstract was also chosen for presentation at the Basic Science Summary Session of the SNM. She received her PhD in molecular and immunological pharmacology from the Peking University Health Science Center in China, where she specialized in tumor angiogenesis and anti-angiogenesis therapy. In 2005, she joined Dr. Shawn Chen's laboratory, where she develops molecular imaging probes for the treatment monitoring and target therapy of tumor angiogenesis.

Awards and Honors: July 21, 2009

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Anne Marie Sawyer, BS, RT(R)(MR), manager of the MR Whole Body Research Systems at the Richard M. Lucas Center for Imaging, has been appointed as member of the Food and Drug Administration's Circulatory System Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee. The Circulatory System Devices Panel "reviews and evaluates data concerning the safety and effectiveness of marketed and investigational devices for use in the circulatory and vascular systems and makes appropriate recommendations to the Commissioner of Food and Drugs." Ms. Sawyer was appointed to this panel in recognition of her enduring contributions to the safe and efficient operation of MR systems.

She began her career in magnetic resonance imaging in September of 1985 as . . .

an MR applications specialist for GE Medical Systems providing education on-site for customers with new installations and system upgrades. In 1987 and 1990, respectively, she served as supervisor (MR) and then manager (MR, CT, X-ray, nuclear medicine, and mammography) for applications specialists in the western region of the United States. In 1991, Ms. Sawyer became a member of MR Advanced Applications and Customer Support at GE Medical Systems headquarters in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, where her primary responsibilities included assistance in the design and implementation of software, hardware, and imaging accessories; support for pre-product clinical evaluations; customer education; organization and direction of educational symposia; and development of educational material and tools.

In 1993, Ms. Sawyer began in the Stanford Department of Radiology as the manager of MR Whole Body Research Systems in the Radiological Sciences Laboratory at the Richard M. Lucas Center for Imaging. For over 16 years, she has provided technical, scientific, and educational consultation to researchers, as well as assistance in the design and direction of research studies conducted at the Lucas Center on the 1.5T, 3.0T#1, 3.0T#2 and 7.0T whole body MR systems. To support Lucas users and distribute MR-specific documentation, she maintains a website of her own design and conducts Stanford MR technologist symposia.

Ms. Sawyer has been a member of the Section for MR Technologists (SMRT) of the International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine (ISMRM) since 1991 and has served as past president as well as chair and member of numerous committees. Because of her dedication to SMRT, she has been honored with elevation to Fellow of the Section and with the prestigious Honorary Membership of the SMRT in recognition of her major achievements in the field of magnetic resonance imaging. She is currently the editor of the SMRT accredited Home Study Program, Educational Seminars. Her published articles include over 50 peer-reviewed publications. In addition, she has delivered more than 50 invited lectures and co-authored three book chapters. Among Ms. Sawyer's numerous awards are the Crues-Kressel Award from the SMRT for her outstanding contributions to MR technologist education and a 3rd Place Poster Award at the 2006 Annual ISMRM Meeting. As manager of our Lucas magnet systems, she is nationally consulted regarding all aspects of MR safety and systems operation.

Awards and Honors: July 20, 2009

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Christoph Lee, MD, has been named 1 of only 29 Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Clinical Scholars for 2010-2012, a highly prestigious and extremely competitive two-year fellowship in health policy. Through the Fellowship, outstanding young physicians "conduct innovative research and work with communities, organizations, practitioners and policymakers on issues important to the health and well-being of all Americans." Dr. Lee is the only radiologist to have been selected this year and is one of very few radiologists selected to participate since the beginning of the program in 1969. To read the press release announcing his award, please access http://rwjcsp.unc.edu/resources/pressreleases/2010-12_CSP_New_Scholars.pdf or Download file.


Dr. Lee earned his BA, graduating cum laude, from Princeton University, and received his MD from Yale University where he also graduated cum laude. He is currently completing his residency in diagnostic radiology at Stanford University. Prior to coming to Stanford, Dr. Lee managed a global tuberculosis initiative for Ralph Nader in Washington, D.C., and was an analyst for the Lewin Group, a national healthcare policy research and consulting firm. He has helped lead more than 10 different service organizations at the community, state, national, and international levels over the last decade. In addition, Dr. Lee is the author of multiple medical board review texts distributed internationally by McGraw-Hill & Co., and he is the first author of several original research articles regarding medical imaging health policy, which are published in leading peer-reviewed journals. Dr. Lee has also served on several national editorial and executive boards and is a recipient of numerous research and leadership awards, including the 2009 American Medical Association Foundation Leadership Award. As a Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholar, Dr. Lee plans to examine diagnostic imaging from the perspectives of cost effectiveness, clinical effectiveness, and resource utilization. For his prior blog award, please access http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2009/03/awards_and_hono_82.html.

Awards and Honors: July 17, 2009

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Andrei Iagaru, MD; Erik Mittra, MD, PhD; and Michael Goris, MD, PhD, have received the 2009 Society of Nuclear Medicine Image of the Year Award for their image comprised of two sets of before-and-after PET scans of two patients, one of whom was treated with Iodine-131 tositumomab, and the other, with Yttrium-90 ibritumomab tiuxetan. The scans examine the effectiveness of two radioimmunotherapy agents in treating non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). To view the image, please access http://interactive.snm.org/img/SNM-2009-Image-of-the-Year.jpg. Please see biographies for Drs. Iagaru and Mittra below.


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Andrei Iagaru, MD, instructor of nuclear medicine, completed medical school at the Carol Davila University of Medicine, Bucharest, Romania, and an internship at Drexel University College of Medicine, Graduate Hospital, in the Department of Medicine. He began his residency at the University of Southern California (USC) Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles, in the Division of Nuclear Medicine, where he was the chief resident. He finished his residency and completed a PET/CT fellowship at Stanford University's School of Medicine in the Division of Nuclear Medicine. He is currently an Instructor in the Department of Radiology and his current research interests include whole-Body MRI and PET/CT for early cancer detection; Zevalin/Bexxar radioimmunotherapy; optical imaging of breast cancer; clinical translation of novel PET radiopharmaceuticals; and PET-CT imaging for thyroid/breast cancers, melanoma, lymphoma, and sarcoma. For his prior blog posting, please access http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2009/05/awards_and_hono_91.html and http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2008/07/awards_and_hono_47.html.


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Erik Mittra, MD, PhD, instructor of nuclear medicine, attended Stony Brook University Medical Scientist Training Program where he received his MD and PhD degrees in biomedical engineering as well as a master's degree in the anatomical sciences. After completing his internship in the Department of Internal Medicine at Stony Brook University Hospital, he finished his residency and fellowship in the Division of Nuclear Medicine at Stanford University Hospital and Clinics. In addition to the 2009 Society of Nuclear Medicine Image of the Year Award, Dr. Mittra has received the 2007 Radiological Society of North America Trainee Research Prize (co-author); was awarded 2007 Norman D. Poe Memorial Scholarship Award for Outstanding In-Training Oral Abstract at the 32nd Annual Western Regional Society of Nuclear Medicine Meeting (co-winner); and served as the Chief Nuclear Medicine Resident for 2007-2008. He has also published over 10 published manuscripts and 25 abstracts.


Awards and Honors: July 14, 2009

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Laura Sasportas, PhD candidate in the Multimodality Molecular Imaging Laboratory, has been awarded a Student Fellowship Award by the Society of Nuclear Medicine . She received this award for her proposal, "In Vivo Molecular Imaging of Circulating Tumor Cells and Early Invasion in a Human Cancer-Stem Cell Based Model of Breast Tumor." SNM Student Fellowship Awards support full-time participation in clinical and basic research activities for students who demonstrate outstanding competence in nuclear medicine and/or molecular imaging research.

A native of Strasbourg, France, Laura Sasportas completed two years of math and physics studies at the bachelor's degree level before entering Ecole Centrale Paris, which is a multidisciplinary engineering school. She was then selected for the Top Industrial Managers for Europe (T.I.M.E.) master's double degree program, Europe's leading network for the training of bi-cultural and bilingual engineers. In 2007, Ms. Sasportas received a Master of Science Engineering Diploma from the Ecole Centrale Paris, and a Master of Science in Biomedical Engineering from the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH Zurich). At ETH Zurich, she specialized in bioimaging, magnetic resonance imaging, and molecular imaging. Dr. Sasportas completed her master's thesis at the Harvard Medical School Center for Molecular Imaging Research (MGH) in Boston, Massachusetts. Her thesis aimed at developing and imaging in vivo an anti-angiogenic therapy for malignant brain tumors using human neural stem cells as a delivery vehicle.

In 2008, Ms. Sasportas worked as a scientific associate at the Novartis Institute for Biomedical Research/Center for Proteomics Chemistry on the lead discovery platform in Basel, Switzerland. She was in charge of cell-line engineering and support of the imaging-based cellular assay development for high-throughput drug screening. Later that year, Ms. Sasportas was also awarded an International Fulbright Science and Technology Award grant to pursue a PhD in bioengineering at Stanford University, where she is currently enrolled.

Her hobbies include literature, theater, drawing, painting, swimming, hiking, and traveling.

Awards and Honors: July 7, 2009

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Francis Blankenberg, MD, associate professor of radiology and associate professor (by courtesy) of pediatrics, has been awarded stimulus funds by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) for his project, "scVEGF Targeted Radiotherapy of Primary and Metastatic Mammary and Colonic Carcinoma."

Dr. Blankenberg received his medical degree from the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). After finishing a general surgical intership and his residency at Stanford University Hospital, . . .

he completed a pediatric fellowship at Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital. Dr. Blankenberg left Stanford to become a clinical instructor of computer tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in the Department of Radiology at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF). In July of 2001, he returned to Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital as an assistant professor of radiology. Dr. Blankenberg has over 95 publications and 3 U.S. and foreign patents.

Dr. Blankenberg's research grant, "scVEGF Targeted Radiotherapy of Primary and Metastatic Mammary and Colonic Carcinoma," focuses on tumor vasculature, which has a unique set of markers including vascular endothelial cell growth factor (VEGF) receptors. Prior efforts to starve tumors by attacking these blood vessels with new, highly selective anti-VEGF drugs as single agents have been largely unsuccessful. Dr. Blankenberg and his colleagues propose to attach radiotherapeutic isotopes to a new form of VEGF known as scVEGF and to use this radiolabeled material to attack not only the tumor blood vessels/supply but also tumor cells. Successful completion of this proposal will be critical in laying the preclinical groundwork for a new class of tumor vessel radiotherapeutic agents that, by attacking a tumor on two fronts, will be more effective than current anti-VEGF drugs.

The grant will support the hiring of Helen D'Arceuil, PhD, visiting assistant professor from Harvard and former researcher at the Lucas Center, who has expertise in small animal imaging with MRI of ischemic injury and brain development. Dr. D'Arceuil will now be assisting with the current award by employing her over twenty years experience in small animal modeling and imaging. The grant will also support the continued work of Zoia Levashova, PhD, who has over twenty years of experience in biochemical and animal model work at NIH. Dr. Levashova has spent the last four years with Dr. Blankenberg in the Nuclear Medicine Imaging Laboratory, and she has performed most of the pilot work for the current grant application and will play a major role in the successful execution of our proposal.

To read more about the award, please access "First Round of NIH Stimulus Funds Includes 18 Projects at Stanford School of Medicine."

Awards and Honors: June 25, 2009

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Jin Xie, PhD, postdoctoral fellow in the Molecular Imaging Probe Laboratory (MIPL), has been awarded a Travel Award from the Society of Nuclear Medicine (SNM). The purpose of the SNM Travel Awards is to provide support to nuclear medicine scientists for presenting innovative work at the SNM Annual Meeting. Dr. Xie will use his award to attend the 56th Society of Nuclear Medicine Annual Meeting from June 13 to June 17 in Toronto, Canada.

In June 2008, Dr. Xie received his PhD from Brown University, where his research centered on magnetic nanoparticle synthesis, characterization, and surface modification as well as the magnetic nanoparticle interplay with biomolecules and their applications in molecular imaging and drug delivery. Moving to Stanford in July 2009, he joined Dr. Xiaoyuan Chen's group as a Stanford postdoctoral fellow in the Molecular Imaging Probe Laboratory (MIPL), where he has been working on the development of magnetic nanoparticle-based probes for MRI. Since then, Dr. Xie has extended his research interests to many other areas, such as NIRF, PET, stem cell, etc., and he is currently working on developing nanoparticle-based activatable probe development and on creating probes that are suitable for multi-modality purposes. When he is not in the lab, Dr. Xie enjoys electronic games. He is also a fan of soccer and karaoke.

Awards and Honors: June 22, 2009

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Sri-Rajasekhar (Raj) Kothapalli, PhD, postdoctoral fellow in the Multimodality Molecular Imaging Lab, has been appointed to a Hamalainen Pelican Postdoctoral Fellowship by the Sir Peter and Lady Michael Foundation. This postdoctoral fellowship supports innovative research, clinical trials, and applied methods for improving the detection, management, and non-invasive treatment of prostate cancer, with a particular focus on the development of multimodal (photoacoustic, optical, and ultrasound) molecular imaging techniques for obtaining rigorous and comprehensive information about early stage prostate cancer.

Dr. Kothapalli received his bachelor of science degree in mathematics, physics, & chemistry from Nagarujuna University, India, followed by his master of science degree in nuclear physics from Andhra University, India, and his master of technology degree in applied optics from the Indian Institute of Technology, Delhi.

Before receiving his master of science in applied physics from the University of Massachusetts, Boston, Dr. Kothapalli worked for an Indian defense organization developing optical pattern recognition techniques. While at the University of Massachusetts, he applied these pattern recognition techniques to medical imaging processing in areas such as mammography. His master's work piqued his interest in medical imaging, so he attained his PhD in biomedical engineering at Washington University in Saint Louis, Missouri, where he focused on developing a hybrid imaging modality that combines the advantages of both optics (high contrast) and ultrasound (excellent resolution and penetration depth). Working under the mentorship of Dr. Sanjiv Gambhir, Dr. Kothapalli plans to apply his background in physics and engineering to develop multimodal molecular imaging techniques for the early detection of cancer, with a particular emphasis on prostate cancer.

In his spare time, he enjoys playing tennis in the summer; squash in the winter; and listening to inspirational music.

Awards and Honors: June 15, 2009

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Keren Ziv, PhD, postdoctoral fellow in the Multimodality Molecular Imaging Lab, has received a Life Sciences Research Foundation Fellowship (LSRF), which is bestowed upon young scientists who perform the highest quality of research.

Prior to joining Dr. Gambhir's Multimodality Molecular Imaging Lab, Dr. Ziv was a postdoctoral scholar in Professor Michal Neeman's lab at the Weizmann Institute in Rehovot, Israel. She received both her PhD and master's degrees from the Department of Biological Regulation of the Feinberg Graduate School at the Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, Israel. Her PhD research focused on the functional and molecular imaging of gene expression.

Dr. Ziv is the coauthor of seven publications as well as the recipient of many honors including the 2007 Auto Swartz Award and the 2008 AFLACAACR International Scholar-in-Training Award supported by Aflac, Inc.

Awards and Honors: June 10, 2009

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Gang Niu, PhD, postdoctoral scholar in the Molecular Imaging Probe Laboratory (MIPL), has been awarded a Society of Nuclear Medicine (SNM) Travel Award to attend the 56th Society of Nuclear Medicine Annual Meeting from June 13 to June 17 in Toronto, Canada. The purpose of the SNM Travel Awards is to provide support to nuclear medicine scientists for presenting innovative work at the SNM Annual Meeting. Dr. Niu received his PhD in free radical radiation biology from the University of Iowa, Iowa City, where his research focused on molecular imaging and tumor gene therapy, mediated by the human sodium iodide symporter (hNIS), to investigate the role of hNIS as a reporter gene monitoring gene transfer and expression. After arriving at Stanford in 2006, he began working in the MIPL under the supervision of Dr. Xiaoyuan Chen. Dr. Niu's current research interests include the investigation of tumor initiation and the progress and response to various therapies with non-invasive molecular imaging strategies, including optical and radiological modalities.

Awards and Honors: June 9, 2009

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Jeremy Pearl, Stanford medical student and member of the Cardiovascular Gene and Cell Therapy Group, has been awarded a second-year fellowship to the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI). Fellowship recipients are selected because they have shown "the greatest promise for future achievement in biomedical research" and "have demonstrated superior scholarship." Mentored by Joe Wu, MD, PhD, assistant professor of medicine (cardiology) and radiology, and Mark M. Davis, PhD, professor of microbiology and immunology, Mr. Pearl was initially awarded a first-year HHMI Fellowship in 2008. In 2009, he was one of a few select fellows who was given a second-year HHMI fellowship because of his outstanding biomedical research on the immunogenic properties of human embryonic stem cells.

Before beginning medical school at Stanford, Mr. Pearl graduated summa cum laude from the University of California, San Diego, with a BS in human biology. In addition to the 2008-2009 and 2009-2010 Howard Hughes Medical Institute Medical Student Fellowships, he was acquired numerous honors, including the 2007 Orthopaedic Research and Education Foundation Research Fellowship. Mr. Pearl is also the first named inventor on the patent "Methods for the Control of Macrophage-Associated Inflammation" (S07-398 (STAN-593) 12/397, 925), and the co-author of over 15 abstracts, posters, and oral presentations as well as 5 publications, including "Seeing Is Believing: Tracking Cells to Determine the Effects of Cell Transplantation" (Pearl J, Wu JC) in Seminars in Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery (2008;20(2):102-109). When he is not working, Mr. Pearl enjoys playing and watching all sports, particularly basketball.

Awards and Honors: June 3, 2009

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Amelie Lutz, MD, PhD, clinical instructor of radiology and research scientist in the Multimodality Molecular Imaging Lab, has received the Marsha Rivkin Center for Ovarian Cancer Research Scholar Award for her project "Early Detection of Ovarian Cancer Using Targeted Microbubble-Enhanced Ultrasound." To promote career development, the Marsha Rivkin Center for Ovarian Cancer Research Scholar Award is bestowed upon young researchers in the field of ovarian cancer, whose projects have translational potential.

Before becoming a CE and research scientist, Dr. Lutz was a postdoctoral fellow in the Multimodality Molecular Imaging Laboratory at Stanford. She received her medical degree from the University of Freiburg, Germany, and completed her internship in internal medicine in the Department of Gastroenterology and Endocrinology at the University Hospital in Freiburg, Germany. Dr. Lutz did her training in diagnostic radiology at the University Hospital in Zurich and at the Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Kantonal Hospital, in Frauenfeld, Switzerland.

In addition to the Marsha Rivkin Center for Ovarian Cancer Research Scholar Award, Dr. Lutz has received numerous honors, including the 2008 Bronze Award from the European Society of Gastrointestinal Radiology (co-author) and the 2004 Swiss Society of Radiology Research Award for her paper "Ultra Small Superparamagnetic Oxide (USPIO) Enhanced MR Imaging for Detection of Macrophage Activity in an Experimental Model of Antigen-Induced Arthritis," which is one of her 27 peer-reviewed publications. Her clinical and research interests include: musculoskeletal radiology and interventions; body imaging with computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging; molecular imaging in oncology; cellular imaging of musculoskeletal inflammatory diseases; and kinematic musculoskeletal imaging. When she is not working, Dr. Lutz enjoys life as a new mom with her family.

For her prior blog award posting, please access http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2007/02/awards_and_hono_18.html.

Awards and Honors: June 2, 2009

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Juergen K. Willmann, MD, assistant professor of radiology (abdominal imaging) and head of the Translational Molecular Imaging Laboratory, has received the highly prestigious Walter Friedrich Award at the 90th Annual Meeting of the German Society of Radiology in Berlin. The award was named in honor of Dr. Walter Friedrich, a 1914 Nobel Laureate. Awarded only once each year, the Walter Friedrich Award was bestowed upon Dr. Juergen K. Willmann for his outstanding research in the field of radiology.

Prior to becoming an assistant professor at Stanford, Dr. Willmann was a research fellow in the Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford (MIPS) while concurrently an assistant professor of diagnostic radiology at the Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital Zurich, Switzerland. He received his MD from the Albert-Ludwigs-University Freiburg, Germany, and was the chief resident of diagnostic radiology at the University Hospital Zurich, Switzerland. Under his leadership, the Translational Molecular Imaging Lab focuses on multimodality molecular imaging of angiogenesis and stem cell therapy as well as the development of multi-modality imaging approaches for the early detection of cancer. When he is not working, Dr. Willmann enjoys his life as a new Dad and plays the piano. To read Dr. Willmann's prior award postings, please access http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2009/04/awards_and_hono_79.html; http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2009/01/awards_and_hono_73.html; http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2008/11/awards_and_hono_61.html; http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2008/05/awards_and_hono_38.html; http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2007/12/awards_and_hono_21.html; and
http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2007/02/awards_and_hono_18.html.

Awards and Honors: May 26, 2009

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Andrei Iagaru, MD, instructor of nuclear medicine, received the Alavi-Mandell Award from the Society of Nuclear Medicine for his paper "90Y-Ibritumomab Therapy in Refractory Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma: Observations from 111In-Ibritumomab Pretreatment Imaging." Dr. Iagaru's article is featured on the cover of and published in the Journal of Nuclear Medicine (2008 Nov;49(11):1809-12. Epub 2008 Oct 16). The Alavi-Mandell Award "honors the work of a young investigator who is pursuing a career in nuclear medicine" and will be presented to Dr. Iagaru at the 2009 SNM Annual Meeting in Toronto.

Dr. Iagaru completed medical school at the Carol Davila University of Medicine, Bucharest, Romania, and an internship at Drexel University College of Medicine, Graduate Hospital, in the Department of Medicine. He began his residency at the University of Southern California (USC) Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles, in the Division of Nuclear Medicine, where he was the chief resident. He finished his residency and completed a PET/CT fellowship at Stanford University's School of Medicine in the Division of Nuclear Medicine. He is currently an Instructor in the Department of Radiology and his current research interests include whole-Body MRI and PET/CT for early cancer detection; Zevalin/Bexxar radioimmunotherapy; optical imaging of breast cancer; clinical translation of novel PET radiopharmaceuticals; and PET-CT imaging for thyroid/breast cancers, melanoma, lymphoma, and sarcoma.

For his prior blog posting, please access http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2008/07/awards_and_hono_47.html.

Awards and Honors: May 21, 2009

Roland1_100.jpgRoland Bammer, PhD, along with his collaborators Drs. Fischbein, and Moseley, has received R01 grant funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) for his project, "Novel Acquisition Methods for Diffusion MRI." This is one of the first ARRA awards in the School of Medicine. The goal of Dr. Bammer's research project is to improve pediatric imaging by developing diffusion-weighted 3D spiral projection imaging for high-resolution 3D SSFP and SE DTI at 3T, reducing distortions related to motion and susceptibility differences. This past winter 2009, Dr. Bammer, along with his collaborators Drs. Atlas, Barnes, and Moseley, also received R01 funding for his project "Short Axis EPI for Diffusion Tensor MRI at High Field," which focuses on developing new types of EPI sequences for high resolution, low SAR, diffusion tensor imaging at 3T and 7T using parallel receive and parallel transmit technology. The success of his research projects will significantly improve MR exams in both children and adult patients by reducing the overall scan time; improving the diagnostic capacity of the images; and providing an alternative contrast mechanism and the means to understand more clearly the underlying tissue microstructure, particularly in terms of how it is composed and how the brain is anatomically/functionally connected with different regions.

For his prior blog posting, please access http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2007/09/awards_and_hono_2.html.

Awards and Honors: May 20, 2009

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Natesh Parashurama, MD, PhD, postdoctoral fellow in the Multimodality Molecular Imaging Lab, received a Young Investigator Award at the International Society for Cellular Therapy 2009 Annual Meeting for his presentation "Stably Expressed Multimodality Fusion Reporter Genes For Tracking Mesenchymal Stem Cell Status in Hearts of Living Subjects." These merit-based Awards are offered to select Young Investigators submitting abstracts.

Dr. Parashurama received his BS in chemical engineering from MIT and his medical degree from the State University of New York at Buffalo. Subsequently, he completed his PhD in chemical bioengineering at Rutgers University. While earning his PhD, he completed a three and a half-year graduate fellowship at Harvard Medical School.

Dr. Parashurama's research interests include using multimodality imaging of stem cell functions for both enhanced understanding of the biology of stem cells and for translating these techniques to the clinic. These functions include cell homing and differentiation; the application of quantitative molecular imaging tools to study cell proliferation and differentiation; cell function; the cellular micro-environment; cell trafficking; the immune response; and cell-mediated gene therapy. For his prior blog posting, please access http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2009/01/awards_and_hono_74.html and http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2008/02/awards_and_hono_28.html.


Awards and Honors: May 18, 2009

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Kim Butts Pauly, PhD, associate professor of radiology and of bioengineering (by courtesy), was recently recognized as Fellow of the International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine (ISMRM) at the 20009 annual meeting in Honolulu, Hawaii. Dr. Butts Pauly was made a Fellow of the ISMRM for her "significant and substantial contributions to research" in her field.

Dr. Butts Pauly received her PhD in biophysical sciences from Mayo Graduate School. She was a postdoctoral research fellow in our Department, becoming an assistant professor of radiology in 1996. Dr. Butts Pauly's current research interests are focused on image-guided minimally invasive therapies, including MR-guided high intensity focused ultrasound and MR-guided cryoablation. She has published her work in over 75 peer-reviewed publications. When Dr. Butts Pauly is not working, she enjoys gardening, traveling with her family, and reading with her kids.

Awards and Honors: May 6, 2009

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Zheng Miao, PhD, postdoctoral scholar in the Cancer Molecular Imaging Chemistry Laboratory, has been granted the First Prize in Basic Science Award for his abstract entitled "A Protein Scaffold Based Molecule for EGFR PET Imaging" from the Society of Nuclear Medicine (SNM). He will receive his award at the SNM Annual Meeting, which will be held in Toronto, Canada, on June 14-17, 2009.

As a postdoctoral scholar at Stanford, his research focuses on the application of scaffold protein in molecular imaging. Dr. Miao's other areas of specialization include protein engineering; the synthesis of synthesis of bifunctional metal chelates and of peptides and analogs, with solid phase resin; and the conjugation of proteins and peptides to solid surface resin as well as the cross-linking of proteins. Most recently, he published a research article in Bioconjugate Chemistry: "Cysteinylated Protein as Reactive Disulfide: An Alternative Route to Affinity-Labeling" (2008;19;15-19).

Dr. Miao received his PhD in biophysical chemistry from the University of California, Davis, where he completed his dissertation entitled "Synthesis and Medical Application of Bifunctional Metal Chelates." When he's not working, Dr. Miao enjoys hiking, rafting, and sports. One of his other favorite activities, he commented, is "spending time with my lovely family."


Awards and Honors: April 22, 2009

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Dr. Shreyas Vasanawala, assistant professor of radiology, has received the Morgridge Scholar Grant, which is awarded to scientists whose research promises to "create a novel design, solve a specific problem, challenge an existing paradigm or clinical practice, address a critical barrier to progress in the field, or develop new technology." Dr. Vasanawala joined the Department of Radiology faculty in July of 2007, after receiving his degree and a PhD in biophysics from Stanford University, followed by residency training in radiology at Stanford University Medical Center and a pediatric radiology fellowship at Lucile Packard Children's Hospital (LPCH). During his fellowship, Dr. Vasanawala received specialty training in pediatric musculoskeletal imaging at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center and in pediatric cardiovascular imaging at Sick Kids in Toronto. At Stanford, Dr. Vasanawala's research focus includes testing the feasibility of magnetic resonance imaging techniques for evaluating pediatric and abdominal disease. His proposal focuses on reducing sedation or anesthesia for pediatric MRI. For his prior blog postings, please access
http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2009/03/awards_and_hono_78.html;
http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2009/02/awards_and_hono_76.html;
http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2008/07/awards_and_hono_43.html;
and
http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2007/07/new_faculty_hir.html.

Awards and Honors I: April 20, 2009

Cheng_Zhen_72.jpgZhen Cheng, PhD, head of the Cancer Molecular Imaging Chemistry Laboratory (CMICL), has been awarded a Young Investigator Award by the Melanoma Research Alliance, which supports "outstanding young investigators whose work shows great promise in the field of melanoma research." Dr. Cheng received his Bachelor of Science degree in chemistry from Sichuan University. He also holds an MS from the National Research Center of Isotope Engineering and Technology & China Institute of Atomic Energy and a PhD from the Department of Chemistry at the University of Missouri-Columbia. From 2001 to 2003, he was a postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Radiology at Harvard Medical School. His awards include a California Breast Cancer Research Program-IDEA Award in 2008; a Young Investigator Travel Scholarship to attend the 2005 Academy of Molecular Imaging Annual Conference; and a 1997-1998 graduate fellowship at the University of Missouri-Columbia. As head of the Cancer Molecular Imaging Chemistry Laboratory (CMICL) of MIPS, he is developing novel molecular imaging probes and non-invasive techniques for the early detection of cancer and its metastasis. He is also researching the molecular, metabolic, and physiological characteristics of cancers and their responses to therapy by identifying novel cancer biomarkers with significant clinical relevance; by devising new chemistry for the preparation of probes; and by validating new strategies for probes by using high-throughput screening. For his prior blog posting, please access
http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2008/01/new_faculty_hir_3.html.

(Image courtesy of Mark Riesenberger)

Awards and Honors II: April 20, 2009

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Kazim Narsinh, research fellow in the Multimodality Molecular Imaging Laboratory (MMIL), was awarded the 2009 Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) Research Fellowship. Bestowed upon outstanding medical students, the HHMI Fellowship helps further promising careers in translational research. Mr. Narsinh's research interests include the molecular imaging of human embryonic stem cells, and he has recently coauthored two in press articles: "Application of Reporter Gene Imaging for Studying Human Embryonic Stem Cells in Living Subjects" (Methods in Molecular Biology 2009 vol. 515) and "Comparisons of Gene Transfer Efficiency in Human Embryonic Stem Cells" (Molecular Imaging and Biology 2009). In addition to working as a research fellow in the MMIL, Mr. Narsinh is currently a medical student at the University of San Diego, (UCSD), School of Medicine, where he is the manager of the Cardiology Clinic as well as a member of the UCSD Student-Run Free Clinic and the Global Health Interest Group. Prior to attending medical school, he graduated from the University of California, Berkeley, with a Bachelor of Arts in biochemistry. When not working, Mr. Narsinh enjoys playing tennis and tabla, a hand drum.

Awards and Honors: April 17, 2009

Wu_100100.jpgJoseph Wu, MD, PhD, assistant professor of medicine (cardiology) and radiology, has received the 2009 Douglas P. Zipes Distinguished Young Scientist Award. According to the American College of Cardiology (ACCR), the award is given "[t]o recognize a young scientist who has made outstanding contributions to the field of cardiovascular medicine and who has amassed an impressive body of scientific research in either the clinical or basic domain." For Dr. Wu's prior awards, please see http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2008/11/awards_and_hono_63.html; http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2008/10/_joseph_wu_md_p.html ; http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2008/06/awards_and_hono_42.html ; and http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2007/04/awards_and_hono_1.html.

Awards and Honors: April 1, 2009

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Juergen K. Willmann, MD, assistant professor of radiology (abdominal imaging) and member of the Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford (MIPS), has been named as a 2009-10 pilot awardee by the Stanford Digestive Disease Center, an NIH-funded (P30) research center program led by Dr. Harry Greenberg. After a very competitive selection process, Dr. Willmann was selected as one of five pilot awardees, based on his project, "Non-Invasive Molecular Ultrasound Imaging for Diagnosing and Monitoring Inflammatory Bowel Disease Using Molecularly Targeted Microbubbles."

Prior to becoming an assistant professor at Stanford, Dr. Willmann was a research fellow in the Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford (MIPS) while concurrently an assistant professor of diagnostic radiology at the Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital Zurich, Switzerland. He received his MD from the Albert-Ludwigs-University Freiburg, Germany, and was the chief resident of diagnostic radiology at the University Hospital Zurich, Switzerland. Under his leadership, the Translational Molecular Imaging Lab focuses on multimodality molecular imaging of angiogenesis and stem cell therapy as well as the development of multi-modality imaging approaches for the early detection of cancer. When he is not working, Dr. Willmann enjoys his life as a new Dad and plays the piano. To read Dr. Willmann's prior award postings, please access http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2009/01/awards_and_hono_73.html; http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2008/11/awards_and_hono_61.html; http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2008/05/awards_and_hono_38.html; http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2007/12/awards_and_hono_21.html; and
http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2007/02/awards_and_hono_18.html.


Awards and Honors: March 31, 2009

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Christoph Lee, MD, third-year radiology resident, has been awarded the American Medical Association (AMA) Foundation's 2009 Leadership Award, which is designed "to encourage involvement in organized medicine and continue leadership development among the country's brightest and most energetic medical students, residents, early career physicians and established physicians." On March 9th, Dr. Lee was honored for his strong non-clinical leadership skills in medicine and the community at the AMA's annual Excellence in Medicine Awards Ceremony in Washington, D.C., along with 30 other award recipients.

Dr. Lee graduated cum laude from both Princeton University, where he received his bachelor's degree, and Yale University Medical School. Through his authorship of multiple research articles and commentaries in peer-reviewed journals, he has advocated at the national level for public health and education regarding CT radiation risks. He has also served as a project manager of a global tuberculosis initiative for Ralph Nader in Washington, D.C., and as an analyst for a prominent national healthcare policy research and consulting firm. At the community level, Dr. Lee helped implement the Healthcare for the Homeless Program in St. Louis, MO, and assisted in leading a free clinic for migrant farm workers in Connecticut. After completing his residency, Dr. Lee plans to pursue a career in health services and policy research with a focus on the clinically effective and cost-effective utilization of medical imaging. When he's not working, Dr. Lee enjoys running, playing tennis, and keeping up with pop culture.

Awards and Honors: March 25, 2009

Neal Bangerter, PhD, research associate; Garry E. Gold, MD, associate professor of radiology and (by courtesy) bioengineering and orthopedics; Brian Hargreaves, PhD, assistant professor of radiology; Seungbum Koo, PhD, assistant professor of mechanical engineering at Chung-Ang University in South Korea; Ernesto Staroswiecki, PhD; and Ronald Watkins, senior research engineer, received the Cum Laude Award at the 2009 Meeting of the Society of Computed Body Tomography and Magnetic Resonance (SCBT/MR) for their exceptional research project, "Early Detection of Osteoarthritis in Patients with ACL Injury Using Sodium MRI." Please access photos and brief biographies of some of our award winners by clicking on the link below.

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Garry E. Gold, MD, associate professor of radiology and (by courtesy) bioengineering and orthopedics, received a master's degree in electrical engineering from Stanford in 1988 and his MD from Stanford in 1992. Dr. Gold has authored over 60 journal articles, 170 abstracts, and 5 patents in MRI. He has been the principal investigator or a co-investigator on over 30 funded research projects, and he is the principal investigator on two NIH-funded projects to improve MR imaging of osteoarthritis and the use of real-time MRI for the study of biomechanics. The International Skeletal Society recently awarded Dr. Gold the President's Medal, and this is the sixth time he was been awarded the Lauterbur Award for the best MRI paper from the Society for Computed Body Tomography and Magnetic Resonance (SCBT/MR). Dr. Gold reviews manuscripts for ten peer-reviewed journals, including the Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (JMRI) and the Journal of Magnetic Resonance in Medicine (MRM), and he is on the editorial board of several publications. At Stanford, Dr. Gold practices clinical musculoskeletal radiology, teaching medical students, residents, and fellows. He teaches two courses in imaging physics and human anatomy for medical students and graduate students, and he was recently awarded the Kaiser Award for outstanding and innovative contributions to education. He also serves as an advisor and co-advisor for many engineering graduate students and postdoctoral fellows. To view his prior blog postings, please access http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2009/02/drs_gold_and_ha_2.html; http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2009/01/drs_gold_and_ha.html; http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2008/06/people_and_thei_6.html; http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2008/04/awards_and_hono_37.html; http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2008/04/awards_and_hono_31.html; http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2007/10/awards_and_hono_19.html; http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2007/04/awards_and_hono_1.html; http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2007/02/awards_and_hono_18.html; and http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2007/02/new_faculty_hir_1.html.


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Brian Hargreaves, PhD, assistant professor of radiology, completed his doctoral degree in electrical engineering at Stanford University. In 2005, he joined the Stanford Radiology Department faculty. Dr. Hargreaves' research focuses on body magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) applications (including abdominal, vascular, breast, and musculoskeletal imaging) and the development of novel excitation schemes, efficient imaging methods, and reconstruction tools that provide improved diagnostic contrast compared with current methods. Aside from work, he plays ice hockey and soccer, and he is on the volunteer ski patrol at Sugar Bowl ski resort. To view Dr. Hargreaves' pior blog postings, please access http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2009/02/drs_gold_and_ha_2.html; http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2009/01/drs_gold_and_ha.html; and http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2008/04/awards_and_hono_31.html.

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Seungbum Koo, PhD, assistant professor of mechanical engineering at Chung-Ang University in South Korea, received his doctoral degree in mechanical engineering at Stanford University in 2006 and worked as a research associate in radiology until February 2009. His research interests include medical image processing and joint biomechanics, with a focus on knee joint biomechanics and articular cartilage degeneration to understand the mechanical pathways of osteoarthritis in the knee. Dr. Koo recently took a faculty position in South Korea.


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Ronald Watkins, senior research engineer, has been working in medical imaging since joining GE Medical Systems in 1980, where he was part of an engineering team that developed the first commercial version of digital subtraction X-ray angiography. During his career, he has been involved in the development of data acquisition systems for CT as well as several subsystems for the first commercial, high-field 1.5 Tesla magnetic resonance system, including pulse sequence generators, gradient amplifiers, RF amplifiers, and digital image processors. Mr. Watkins began working in the development of transducers and analog front ends for cardiac ultrasound in 1985. Four years later, he developed catheters and electronics for high-resolution, high-frequency intravascular ultrasound at Cardiovascular Imaging Systems in Sunnyvale, a high tech medical device startup company founded by Cardiologist Paul Yock, MD.

In 1991, Mr. Watkins returned to GE's Corporate Research and Development Division in Schenectady, New York, where he worked with co-inventors Harvey Cline, PhD, and Kullervo Hynynen, PhD, at the University of Arizona to develop the first MR-guided focused ultrasound surgery system. In 2000, this technology was transferred to form the basis for the Haifa Israel start-up InsighTec. Mr. Watkins also led the development of the first commercial whole body 3.0 Tesla MRI system, which initiated a rapid increase in the deployment of 3.0 Tesla systems from a few fMRI research sites to the thousands of mainstream clinical radiology sites present today. Furthermore, he developed much of the hardware for massively parallel receive arrays, parallel transmit, and RF subsystems for 7.0 Tesla MRI systems.

In 2007, Mr. Watkins joined the Stanford Department of Radiology, where he has been developing coils and hardware for high-field MRI and has continued the development of MR-guided focused ultrasound, including the use of capacitive micro-machined ultrasound transducers, pioneered by the Khuri-Yakub group in the Stanford E. L. Ginzton Lab. In recognition of his research on the development of MR-guided focused ultrasound, Mr. Watkins was awarded a Magna Cum Laude citation by the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) in 1994. In addition, he has 38 issued U.S. patents and more than 40 conference proceedings and journal publications.

Awards and Honors: March 23, 2009

Marcus Alley, PhD, senior research scientist; Garry E. Gold, MD, associate professor of radiology and (by courtesy) bioengineering and orthopedics at Stanford University; Robert J. Herfkens, MD, professor of radiology, director of MRI, and associate chair for clinical technology; Michael Lustig, PhD, engineering research associate; John Pauly, PhD, professor of electrical engineering; and Dr. Shreyas Vasanawala, assistant professor of radiology, were awarded the 2009 Lauterbur Award by the Society of Computed Body Tomography and Magnetic Resonance (SCBT/MR) for their outstanding research project "Faster Pediatric MRI with Compressed Sensing." The Lauterbur Award in MR was named in honor of Paul Lauterbur, PhD, who was awarded the Nobel Prize in 2003 for his work in MRI. Please find photos and brief biographies of some of our award winners by clicking on the link below.

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Marcus Alley, PhD, senior research scientist, received his BA in physics from Reed College in Portland, Oregon, and his MS (physics) and PhD (nuclear physics) from the University of Wisconsin, Madison, where he completed his thesis entitled "An Effective Range Determination of Phase Shifts for the Elastic Proton Helium-3 Reaction between the Energies of 0 and 12 MeV." Dr. Alley has been a member of the Stanford Department of Radiology since 1994, when he began as a postdoctoral fellow mentored by Norbert Pelc, ScD. After completing his postdoctoral fellowship, Dr. Alley worked as an MR applications and software developer, and, in May of 2005, he became a senior research scientist in our Department. His current research involves developing MRI with compressed sensing for body and pediatric imaging. His past awards include a third place Scientific Paper Award for his paper entitled "Measurement of T1 of Flowing Blood, Extraction Fraction of Gd-DTPA and Single-Kidney GFR Using Interleaved Spiral Acquisition" from the Society of Uroradiology, Twenty-Fifth Scientific Assembly, in 2000. Dr. Alley also has over 35 publications and 7 patents.

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Garry E. Gold, MD, associate professor of radiology and (by courtesy) bioengineering and orthopedics at Stanford University, received a master's degree in electrical engineering from Stanford in 1988 and his MD from Stanford in 1992. Dr. Gold has authored over 60 journal articles, 170 abstracts, and 5 patents in MRI. He has been the principal investigator or a co-investigator on over 30 funded research projects, and he is the principal investigator on two NIH-funded projects to improve MR imaging of osteoarthritis and the use of real-time MRI for the study of biomechanics. The International Skeletal Society recently awarded Dr. Gold the President's Medal, and this is the sixth time he was been awarded the Lauterbur Award for the best MRI paper from the Society for Computed Body Tomography and Magnetic Resonance (SCBT/MR). Dr. Gold reviews manuscripts for ten peer-reviewed journals, including the Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (JMRI) and the Journal of Magnetic Resonance in Medicine (MRM), and he is on the editorial board of several publications. At Stanford, Dr. Gold practices clinical musculoskeletal radiology, teaching medical students, residents, and fellows. He teaches two courses in imaging physics and human anatomy for medical students and graduate students, and he was recently awarded the Kaiser Award for outstanding and innovative contributions to education. He also serves as an advisor and co-advisor for many engineering graduate students and postdoctoral fellows. To view his prior blog postings, please access http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2009/02/drs_gold_and_ha_2.html; http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2009/01/drs_gold_and_ha.html; http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2008/06/people_and_thei_6.html; http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2008/04/awards_and_hono_37.html; http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2008/04/awards_and_hono_31.html; http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2007/10/awards_and_hono_19.html; http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2007/04/awards_and_hono_1.html; http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2007/02/awards_and_hono_18.html; and http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2007/02/new_faculty_hir_1.html.


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Michael Lustig, PhD, engineering research associate, received his BSc in 2001 from the Department of Electrical Engineering, in Technion-IIT, Haifa, Israel. He completed his PhD in 2008 from the Department of Electrical Engineering at Stanford University, where his doctoral research focused on the application of compressed sensing to rapid MRI. Currently, he is a research associate in the Magnetic Resonance Systems Research Lab (MRSRL) in the Stanford Department of Engineering, where his research interests include medical imaging reconstruction, MR pulse sequence design, convex optimization, and inverse problems.


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Dr. Shreyas Vasanawala, assistant professor of radiology, joined the Department of Radiology faculty in July of 2007, after receiving his degree and a PhD in biophysics from Stanford University, followed by residency training in radiology at Stanford University Medical Center and a pediatric radiology fellowship at Lucile Packard Children's Hospital (LPCH). During his fellowship, Dr. Vasanawala received specialty training in pediatric musculoskeletal imaging at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center and in pediatric cardiovascular imaging at Sick Kids in Toronto. At Stanford, Dr. Vasanawala's research focus includes testing the feasibility of magnetic resonance imaging techniques for evaluating pediatric and abdominal disease. In recognition of his research, he recently received an International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine (ISMRM) Seed Grant for his proposed research project, "Non-Contrast-Enhanced Renal MRA Using Multiple Inversion Recovery." Developed in collaboration with doctoral student Hattie Dong and Professor Dwight Nishimura, Dr. Vasanawala's proposal was cited for its innovation and potential impact. The competition was open to young investigators, and only one grant was awarded in each of the areas of low back pain and renal MRI. For his prior blog postings, please access http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2009/02/awards_and_hono_76.html; http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2008/07/awards_and_hono_43.html; and http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2007/07/new_faculty_hir.html.


Awards and Honors: February 19, 2009

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Adam Wang, MS, doctoral student in Electrical Engineering and member of the Radiological Sciences Laboratory (RSL), was 1 of only 8 finalists (out of 34 entrants) for the Michael B. Merickel Student Paper Award at the 2009 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE) Medical Imaging Conference for his work entitled "Optimal Energy Thresholds and Weights for Separating Materials Using Photon Counting X-Ray Detectors with Energy Discriminating Capabilities."

Mentored by Dr. Norbert Pelc, Mr. Wang is currently a research assistant in the RSL where he is investigating task-based optimal multi-energy discrimination techniques for CT systems and developing lossy compression methods to reduce CT data rate without diagnostic impact.

Prior to entering the doctoral program, Mr. Wang received his master's in electrical engineering from Stanford, after completing his BS in electrical engineering at the University of Texas at Austin. In addition to being a finalist for the Michael B. Merickel Student Paper Award, Mr. Wang's other awards include an Electrical Engineering Departmental Fellowship from Stanford University and the Distinguished College of Engineering Scholar Award at the University of Texas at Austin. When he's not working, he enjoys running, cycling, and working on his bikes.

Awards and Honors III: February 13, 2009

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Brian Rutt, PhD, professor of radiology and director of the High-Field MRI Program, has been elected to Fellow of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering (AIMBE). Election to Fellow of the AIMBE is awarded to outstanding bioengineers in academia, industry, and government who have distinguished themselves through their contributions in research, industrial practice, and/or education. On February 12th, Dr. Rutt traveled to Washington, DC, to receive his award as part of the induction ceremony of new fellows of the AIMBE. Before coming to Stanford, Dr. Rutt was a scientist at the Robarts Research Institute and professor of diagnostic radiology and nuclear medicine at the University of Western Ontario, where he has held the Barnett-Ivey Endowed Research Chair, Heart and Stroke Foundation since 1997. At Robarts, he co-founded the Cellular and Molecular Imaging Program; served as the scientific director for the 1.5T and 3T research MRI facilities; and established a hardware engineering core facility. Under his direction, the first 1.5T MRI scanner and one of the first 3T MRI systems in Canada were installed in London, Ontario.

After completing his BASc in engineering science at the University of Toronto, Ontario, Dr. Rutt received his master's degree in electrical engineering from Stanford, returning to Canada to attain his PhD in medical biophysics at the University of Western Ontario. Subsequently, he completed a postdoc at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF). His research interests include MRI technology development and the application of advanced MRI techniques for studying the cardiovascular system, brain, and cancer. When he is not working, Dr. Rutt enjoys bicycling and wood working. For Dr. Rutt's prior blog posting, please access http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2009/02/meet_brian_rutt.html.

Awards and Honors II: February 13, 2009

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Dr. Shreyas Vasanawala, assistant professor of radiology, has won an International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine (ISMRM) Seed Grant for his proposed research project, "Non-Contrast-Enhanced Renal MRA Using Multiple Inversion Recovery." Developed in collaboration with doctoral student Hattie Dong and Professor Dwight Nishimura, Dr. Vasanawala's proposal was cited for its innovation and potential impact. The competition was open to young investigators, and only one grant was awarded in each of the areas of low back pain and renal MRI.

Dr. Vasanawala's research focus includes testing the feasibility of magnetic resonance imaging techniques for evaluating pediatric and abdominal disease. Dr. Vasanawala joined the Department of Radiology faculty in July of 2007, after receiving his degree and a PhD in biophysics from Stanford University, followed by residency training in radiology at Stanford University Medical Center and a pediatric radiology fellowship at Lucile Packard Children's Hospital (LPCH). During his fellowship, Dr. Vasanawala received specialty training in pediatric musculoskeletal imaging at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center and in pediatric cardiovascular imaging at Sick Kids in Toronto. For his prior blog postings, please access http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2008/07/awards_and_hono_43.html and http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2007/07/new_faculty_hir.html.

Awards and Honors I: February 13, 2009

de la zerda.jpgAdam de la Zerda, PhD candidate in the Multimodality Molecular Imaging Laboratory (MMIL), has been awarded the Best Poster Presentation Award for his poster on enhanced sensitivity photoacoustic imaging agents at the Photoacoustic Session of the Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE) Photonics West 2009 Conference.

Mentored by Dr. Gambhir, Mr. de la Zerda researches photoacoustic molecular imaging and its broad applications for cancer. He is the PI of two predoctoral grants: one supported by the Department of Defense (DOD) Breast Cancer Research Program and the other by Bio-X. He has received numerous awards for his work including the Young Investigator Award at the World Molecular Imaging Congress 2008; the Bio-X Student Travel Award; and first place at the Bay Area Entrepreneurship Contest. He holds a number of publications and patents, and he is also a professional reviewer for Nature Nanotechnology and Medical Physics. Prior to coming to Stanford, Mr. de la Zerda received his BScs Summa Cum Laude in computer science, electrical engineering, and physics from the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology in Haifa, Israel.

For Mr. de la Zerda's prior blog award announcements, please access http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2008/11/awards_and_hono_60.html; http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2008/07/awards_and_hono_45.html;
and http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2007/06/awards_and_hono_6.html.

Awards and Honors II: January 30, 2009

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Natesh Parashurama, MD, PhD, postdoctoral scholar in the Multimodality Molecular Imaging Lab, has been awarded a 2009-2010 Dean's Fellowship for his proposal, "Quantitative, Multimodality Molecular Imaging of Spatiotemporally Regulated Cardiac Stem Cell Functions In Vivo." The Dean's Fellowship is designed "to encourage and support young investigators for the first one or two years of postdoctoral (PhD or MD) research training. Dr. Parashurama received his BS in chemical engineering from MIT and his medical degree from the State University of New York at Buffalo. Subsequently, he completed his PhD in chemical bioengineering at Rutgers University. While earning his PhD, he completed a three and a half-year graduate fellowship at Harvard Medical School.

Dr. Parashurama's research interests include using multimodality imaging of stem cell functions for both enhanced understanding of the biology of stem cells and for translating these techniques to the clinic. These functions include cell homing and differentiation; the application of quantitative molecular imaging tools to study cell proliferation and differentiation; cell function; the cellular micro-environment; cell trafficking; the immune response; and cell-mediated gene therapy. For his prior blog posting, please access http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2008/02/awards_and_hono_28.html.

Awards and Honors I: January 30, 2009

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Juergen K. Willmann, MD, assistant professor of radiology (abdominal imaging) and member of the Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford (MIPS), has won the 2008 RSNA Research Award in the category of "Molecular Imaging" and the 2009 Phillip H. Meyers, MD, Research Award of the Society of Gastrointestinal Radiologists. Recipients receive the Phillip H. Meyers, MD, Research Award to facilitate visionary research in medical imaging.

Prior to becoming an assistant professor at Stanford, Dr. Willmann was a research fellow in the Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford (MIPS) while concurrently an assistant professor of diagnostic radiology at the Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital Zurich, Switzerland. He received his MD from the Albert-Ludwigs-University Freiburg, Germany, and was the chief resident of diagnostic radiology at the University Hospital Zurich, Switzerland. His lab, the Translational Molecular Imaging Lab, focuses on multimodality molecular imaging of angiogenesis and stem cell therapy and the development of new ultrasonic imaging approaches for the early detection of cancer. When he is not working, Dr. Willmann enjoys his life as a new Dad and plays the piano. To read Dr. Willmann's prior award postings, please access http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2008/11/awards_and_hono_61.html; http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2008/05/awards_and_hono_38.html; http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2007/12/awards_and_hono_21.html; and
http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2007/02/awards_and_hono_18.html.

Awards and Honors: January 28, 2009

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Audrey Strain, RT, CT technologist, received the January Wingspread Award from the former recipient, Pablo Rodriguez, CRT, ARRT, for her excellence in Radiology. The Wingspread Award is given by one employee to another who has proven that he or she is a "special performer" by demonstrating exemplary performance in areas such as job knowledge; work ethics; communication skills; inter- and intradepartmental relationships; versatility; and judgment. This award gives employees the opportunity to recognize who among them has gone above and beyond the fulfillment of his or her usual duties. Wingspread awardees can keep the award for as long as they wish or until they discover another "special performer." Monthly awarding of the Wingspread honor is encouraged as part of the Stanford Hospital & Clinics (SHC) departmental staff meetings.

Mrs. Strain was first employed at SHC in July of 2001, after graduating from the Foothill College Radiologic Technologies Program in June of 2001. Within one year, she obtained her mammography license and trained in the Stanford Mammography Department. From 2003 to 2004, Mrs. Strain worked for Lucile Packard Children's Hospital as their lead technologist, returning to SHC in 2004 as the lead technologist at the new Cancer Center. Simultaneously, she served as a clinical instructor to the second-year students from Foothill College. After having her first daughter in 2006, Mrs. Strain began her current position in the CT Department as a staff technician, which allows her to spend more time with her daughter by working 16 hours on Saturdays and two additional 8-hour shifts during the week. She also taught at the Foothill College Radiology Laboratory for one quarter but declined further teaching appointments because she did not want to spend more time away from her daughter. On January 14th, Mrs. Strain passed her CT registry exam and is now a licensed CT technologist. She is currently on maternity leave, awaiting the arrival of her second daughter.

(Image courtesy of Mark Riesenberger)

Awards and Honors II: December 19, 2008

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Pablo Rodriguez, CRT, ARRT, received the Wingspread Award this September 2008 because of his outstanding work in Radiology. This award is given by one employee to another who has proven that he or she is a "special performer" by demonstrating exemplary performance in areas such as job knowledge; work ethics; communication skills; inter- and intradepartmental relationships; versatility; and judgment. Mr. Rodriguez graduated from Foothill College with an AS in radiological sciences and completed part of his X-Ray School Rotation at Stanford Hospital, where he has been working full time for the past three years. He currently works weekends and as part of the CT team. He is also the radiologic technologist for a local college football team and a professional football team in the Bay Area.

Mr. Rodriguez describes his experience as follows:

"I have learned a lot at the Hospital because we are a trauma center. In addition to the Trauma Department, my training enables me to work in all areas of the Radiology Department such as the Operating Room, Gastrointestinal Emergency Department, Orthopedic Department, and the Cancer Center. Because of this, I have also supervised all of these areas. In addition, I supervised X-Ray North for one year, which is the head of the radiologic diagnostic areas in the Hospital. I gained a lot of experience by doing this job, and I grew a lot as a radiologic technologist. Most importantly, I learned to be a team player and to respect all people with whom I work. My motto is: Treat others as you like to be treated. I'm really thankful to have the opportunity to work at Stanford Hospital and Clinics, and I like the challenges that come with my work. With all the traumas that a technologist sees, he or she has to become creative to get the best X-ray image or CT scan for the physician to make the most accurate diagnosis. I have also met my close friends here at work." As a result of his dedication, Mr. Rodriguez was voted as the 2007 Radiologic Technologist of the Month by his departmental co-workers. The Wingspread Award is another way in which his co-workers have recognized that he "has gone above and beyond the fulfillment of his usual duties." Wingspread awardees can keep the award for as long as they wish or until they discover another "special performer." Monthly awarding of the Wingspread honor is encouraged as part of the SHC departmental staff meetings.

Mr. Rodriguez moved to the United States from Mexico when he was twelve years old and is the youngest of four children. In high school, he held various leadership positions including Student Body Publicist and ESL Coordinator. In recognition of his service, he received a Rotary Award as well as an award for community involvement. In addition, his senior class voted him as the one who had "Contributed the Most" and as the Homecoming King. In his free time, Mr. Rodriguez enjoys going to the movies and working out. However, spending time with his family is his main priority: "I love my family and really close friends, and I will do anything I can to help them out. My family is the foundation of who I am now."

(Image courtesy of Mark Riesenberger)

Awards and Honors I: December 19, 2008

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Joong-Ho (Johann) Won, PhD, MS, received a Bio-X Travel Award for travel to the 94th Scientific Assembly and Annual Meeting of the 2008 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) to give a presentation on his work entitled, "Towards a Single Uncluttered View of the Abdominal Aortic Vessel Tree from CTA or MRA: Method and Preliminary Results." Based on his dissertation research, Dr. Won's RSNA talk focused on the development of two-dimensional visualization methods, which do not introduce crossings among the branches, for the abdominal aorta and its branches. As a member of Professor Sandy Napel's research group, Dr. Won is also exploring statistical signal processing and large-scale inference problems in biomedical applications. He is a recent graduate of the doctoral program in electrical engineering, where he also earned his master's degree in 2003. Outside of the lab, Dr. Won likes to spend time running, swimming, and traveling with his newly-wedded wife.

Awards and Honors: December 15, 2008

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Daniel Rubin, MD, MS, assistant professor, was awarded a Cum Laude Award from the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) for his exhibit, "'Saying It in Pictures': Annotation and Image Markup in Radiology." Of the 1,663 exhibits at the 2008 RSNA, Dr. Rubin's was one of only 56 selected for an award. Dr. Rubin also appears on Radcast@RSNA, along with Dr. Eliot Siegel, discussing his work on the Cancer Biomedical Informatics Grid of the National Cancer Institute. Dr. Rubin's background is in clinical and investigational radiology as a radiologist and as a researcher. He attended Stanford Medical School and received his master's degree in biomedical informatics. He also completed his residency as well as his body and research fellowships at Stanford University. Dr. Rubin was recruited to Stanford Radiology to participate in building a new section in the information sciences called ISIS (Information Science in Imaging at Stanford). His academic focus is on the intersection of biomedical informatics and imaging science where he is developing computational methods and applications to access and integrate diverse clinical and imaging data; to extract information and meaning from images; to enable data mining and the discovery of image biomarkers; and to translate these methods into practice by creating computer applications that will improve diagnostic accuracy and clinical effectiveness. Dr. Rubin is also chair of the RadLex Steering Committee of the RSNA, an effort to create a standard terminology for all of radiology; chair of the Informatics Committee of the American College of Radiology Imaging Network (ACRIN); and co-chair of the Medical Imaging Systems Working Group of the American Medical Informatics Association. For Dr. Rubin's prior blog posting, please see http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2008/08/ncis_invivo_ima.html.

Awards and Honors: December 8, 2008

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Geoffrey D. Rubin, MD, professor of radiology; chief of cardiovascular imaging; associate dean for clinical affairs; and vice chief of staff, has been awarded a 2008 "Minnie" as the "Most Effective Radiology Educator" from AuntMinnie.com, which annually recognizes two outstanding imaging scientists or physicians in this category with individual Minnies. With 147,000 members, AuntMinnie.com is the world's largest and most comprehensive online medical imaging community. For Dr. Rubin's prior award posting, please access http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2008/10/awards_and_hono_58.html.

Awards and Honors II: December 5, 2008

Yi Gu, MS; Frances Lau, MS; Guillem Pratx, MS; Paul Reynolds, MS; and Arne Vandenbrouke, PhD, members of the Molecular Imaging Instrumentation Laboratory (MIIL), received Medical Imaging Conference Trainee Grants to attend the 2008 Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Inc. Medical Imaging Conference (IEEE MIC) in Dresden, Germany.


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Yi Gu, MS, is researching the development of ultra-high resolution 3D positioning PET systems that use the semiconductor cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) instead of scintillation crystals for photon detection. For Mr. Gu's biography, please access http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2008/12/awards_and_hono_62.html.


Lau.jpgFrances Lau, MS, is a PhD candidate at Stanford, where she researches circuits and devices for biomedical applications. Ms. Lau is currently working on the design and development of hardware for a breast cancer imaging PET system. For her prior award posting, please see http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2007/12/awards_and_hono_24.html .


vandenbroucke.jpgArne Vandenbroucke, PhD, postdoctoral scholar, is researching the design of a high sensitivity, high resolution PET scanner for breast cancer imaging. For Dr. Vandenbroucke's biography please access his earlier award postings at http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2008/03/march_27_2008.html ; http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2007/12/awards_and_hono_24.html ; and http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2007/12/awards_and_hono_23.html.

Awards and Honors I: December 5, 2008

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Yi Gu, MS, PhD candidate in electrical engineering and a member of the Molecular Imaging Instrumentation Laboratory (MIIL), was awarded the Bio-X Travel Award for travel to the 2008 Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Inc. Medical Imaging Conference (IEEE MIC) in Dresden, Germany, where he delivered an oral presentation entitled "Study of a High Resolution, 3-D Positioning Cross-Strip Cadmium Zinc Telluride Detector for PET." This presentation was based on Mr. Gu's dissertation research, which focuses on the development of ultra-high resolution 3D positioning PET systems that use the semiconductor CZT instead of scintillation crystals for photon detection. His other research interests include developing signal processing, modeling, as well as machine learning algorithms, and investigating their applications in medical instrumentation. Prior to entering the PhD program, Mr. Gu received his master's degree in electrical engineering from Stanford in 2005. Outside of the lab, he likes to spend time hiking, participating in social dance, playing tennis, and traveling.

Awards and Honors I: November 25, 2008

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Joseph Wu, MD, PhD, assistant professor of medicine (cardiology) and radiology, has received the Edward Mallinckrodt, Jr. Foundation Junior Faculty Grant for his highly innovative basic science research. As a member of the Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford (MIPS), Dr. Wu's lab focuses on cardiovascular gene and cell therapy.

For Dr. Wu's prior awards, please see http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2008/10/_joseph_wu_md_p.html ; http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2008/06/awards_and_hono_42.html ; and http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2007/04/awards_and_hono_1.html.

Awards and Honors II: November 25, 2008

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Yueyi Irene Liu, PhD, recently won the RSNA Trainee Research Prize for her project, "Bayesian Approach to Decision Support for Evaluating Thyroid Nodules Based on Multi-Variate Features," which she is researching in collaboration with Drs. Aya Kamaya, Terry Desser, and Daniel Rubin. She has also received a Stanford Medical Scholars Award to support further research with Dr. Kamaya. Dr. Liu is currently a fourth-year medical student at Stanford, where she also earned her PhD in biomedical informatics using computational methods to identify regions important in gene regulation. She received her BS in biochemistry from Peking University in Beijing, China. When Dr. Liu is not working, she enjoys traveling and hiking.

Awards and Honors: November 24, 2008

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Shin Kamaya, BSE, was recently awarded a 2008 Radiological Society of North America Research Trainee Scholar Award for his scientific paper entitled, "Manganese-Enhanced MRI (MEMRI) Functionally Highlights Injured Peripheral Nerves in Neuropathic Pain," which he completed under the mentorship of Dr. Sandip Biswal. Mr. Kamaya grew up in Salt Lake City, Utah, and is currently a third-year medical student at the University of Colorado-Denver. Prior to starting medical school, Mr. Kamaya received his undergraduate degree in mechanical engineering from the University of Pennsylvania, spent some time testing cars at GM, and built bridges in Nepal.

To view Mr. Kamaya's prior award posting, please access http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2008/04/awards_and_hono_37.html.

Awards and Honors: November 21, 2008

Willmann100120.jpgJuergen K. Willmann, MD, assistant professor of radiology (abdominal imaging), has received the Radiology 2008 Editor's Recognition Award with Distinction. Dr. Willmann was chosen to receive this highly selective award, which only 105 of approximately 1,000 reviewers have received this year. Prior to becoming an assistant professor at Stanford, Dr. Willmann was a research fellow in the Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford (MIPS) while concurrently an assistant professor of diagnostic radiology at the Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital Zurich, Switzerland. He received his MD from the Albert-Ludwigs-University Freiburg, Germany, and was the chief resident of diagnostic radiology at the University Hospital Zurich, Switzerland. His research interests include multimodality molecular imaging of angiogenesis and stem cell therapy and the development of new ultrasonic imaging approaches for the early detection of cancer. When he is not working, Dr. Willmann enjoys fitness training, hiking, and playing the piano. To read Dr. Willmann's prior award postings, please access http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2008/05/awards_and_hono_38.html; http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2007/12/awards_and_hono_21.html; and
http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2007/02/awards_and_hono_18.html.

Awards and Honors: November 20, 2008

de la zerda.jpgAdam de la Zerda, PhD candidate in the Multimodality Molecular Imaging Laboratory (MMIL), has won three awards in support of his PhD progress: the Young Investigator Award as well as the Student Travel Award from the World Molecular Imaging Congress 2008, and the Bio-X Travel Award. Each of these honors was bestowed on him for his novel work on photoacoustic molecular imaging and its application for tumor molecular imaging using carbon nanotubes. From a group of over 300 candidates, Mr. de la Zerda was selected to receive the Young Investigator Award, which included a competition with oral presentations.

Mentored by Dr. Gambhir, Mr. de la Zerda researches photoacoustic molecular imaging and its broad applications for cancer. He is the PI of two predoctoral grants: one supported by the Department of Defense (DOD) Breast Cancer Research Program and the other by Bio-X. He holds a number of publications and patents and is also a professional reviewer for Nature Nanotechnology and Medical Physics. Prior to coming to Stanford, Mr. de la Zerda received his BScs Summa Cum Laude in computer science, electrical engineering, and physics from the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology in Haifa, Israel.

For Mr. de la Zerda's prior award announcement regarding the DOD Predoctoral Fellowship and the Bio-X Graduate Student Fellowship, please access http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2008/07/awards_and_hono_45.html.
To read about Mr. de la Zerda's accomplishments in the Bay Area Entrepreneurship Contest, please see
http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2007/06/awards_and_hono_6.html.

Awards and Honors: November 17, 2008

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Jill Lin, PhD, postdoctoral scholar in Dr. David Paik's laboratory, was recently granted a travel award by the Helena Anna Henzl Gabor Young Women in Science Fund for travel to the 2009 World Molecular Imaging Congress in Montreal, Canada. Henzl-Gabor Travel Fellowships are awarded to postdoctoral scholars who demonstrate a positive attitude through professional teamwork and collaborations. Dr. Lin's work focuses on mathematical modeling regarding the phenomenon known as oncogene addiction using imaging of conditional expression mouse models, which has led to a quantitative understanding of the biological mechanisms of oncogenes. Her latest work is focused on translational applications including directly applying the model to human lung cancer response to directed therapeutics. The work is done in close collaboration with Dean Felsher in Oncology. Dr. Lin is a member of both MIPS and the newly formed ISIS section, which is focused on information sciences approaches in radiology.

Dr. Lin received her PhD in biomedical and health informatics from the University of Washington where she worked on the image analysis of craiosynostosis skull deformities with Dr. Linda Shapiro. She also received an MS in epidemiology from Stanford and a BS in mathematics from the University of Chicago.

Awards and Honors: October 21, 2008

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Geoffrey D. Rubin, MD, professor of radiology; chief of cardiovascular imaging; vice chief of staff; and associate dean for clinical affairs, has been selected to present the annual Charles T. Dotter Memorial Lecture at the 2008 Scientific Sessions of the American Heart Association on November 11th in New Orleans, Louisiana. His presentation, "More Surprises from the Healthy Donut," explores the evolving role of computed tomography in the diagnosis and management of cardiovascular diseases.

Awards and Honors: October 20, 2008

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Joseph Wu, MD, PhD, assistant professor of medicine (cardiology) and radiology, has been awarded the New Innovator Award from the National Institute of Health. This award is designed to stimulate highly innovative research and to support promising new investigators. Dr. Wu received the New Innovator Award for his research on pluripotent stem cells, which can develop into a wide variety of cell types. Dr. Wu's research produces pluripotent stems cells by turning skin cells into embryonic-like stem cells by using microRNAs, which are single-stranded RNA molecules that are involved in regulating gene expression. To read more about Dr. Wu's award, please access "Creative Thinking Nets Stanford Researchers Two NIH Pioneer Awards, Three New Innovator Awards" at the following link: http://med.stanford.edu/news_releases/2008/september/pioneer.html.

For Dr. Wu's prior awards, please see http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2008/06/awards_and_hono_42.html and http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2007/04/awards_and_hono_1.html.

Awards and Honors: September 29, 2008

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Scott W. Atlas, MD, professor and chief of neuroradiology and senior fellow at both the Hoover Institution and Freeman-Spogli Institute for International Studies, has been selected as a 2008 Homecoming Comeback Guest by his alma mater, the University of Illinois. Dr. Atlas adds his name to a distinguished Illinois alumni list, which includes Governor Jon Corzine; former GE CEO Jack Welch; Netscape Founder Marc Andreesen; and Nobel Prize Winner Jack Kilby. The Homecoming tradition began at the University of Illinois in 1910, and Dr. Atlas will ride as a marshal in the Homecoming Parade and will be honored at the 50-yard line during the Homecoming Football Game at half time.

Dr. Atlas has authored more than 100 scientific publications in leading journals, and he is the editor of the foremost textbook within his field, Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Brain and Spine. Recognized throughout the world as a leader in educational and clinical research, Dr. Atlas serves on the Nominating Committee for the Nobel Prize in Medicine and Physiology. He is also an adviser to major industry leaders in medical technology, and he has a special interest in healthcare public policy.

For Dr. Atlas' prior blog entry, please access Awards and Honors: March-April 2007.

Awards and Honors: July 25, 2008

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Samuel Mazin, PhD, postdoctoral fellow in the Radiological Sciences Lab, has been named a JP and Danyele Garnier Fellow for his outstanding contributions to the Stanford Graduate School of Business Summer Institute for Entrepreneurship Program. The fellowship was established by GlaxoSmithKline in honor of former CEO Jean-Pierre Garnier. Only 5 out of 72 participants are given this honor, which is awarded for "exemplary performance throughout the program which greatly enhanced the experience for all who participated--students and faculty--as well as the anticipated impact the individual will have as they move forward in their career." Dr. Mazin's current research focuses on inverse geometry CT as well as improving CT imaging for people with metal implants. For Dr. Mazin's earlier award posting, please see Awards and Honors: March-April 2007.

Awards and Honors II: July 18, 2008

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Guillem Pratx, PhD, doctoral candidate in electrical engineering and member of the Molecular Imaging Instrumentation Laboratory, was awarded a Travel Award to attend the 2008 Society of Nuclear Medicine (SNM) Annual Meeting to present two papers: "Fast Maximum-Likelihood Image Reconstruction without a Line Search via PCG" and "Maximum a Posteriori Event Positioning in High-Resolution PET CZT Detectors." The purpose of the SNM Travel Awards is to provide support to nuclear medicine students for presenting innovative work at the SNM Annual Meeting. Dr. Pratx completed his undergraduate work in engineering at the Ecole Centrale in Paris, France. In the Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford (MIPS), he is completing his dissertation research, which centers on the development of practical algorithms that exploit graphics processing units (GPU) for fast medical image reconstruction in ultra-high resolution PET systems under development at Stanford. For more details regarding his biography, please see Dr. Pratx's earlier award postings by accessing "Awards and Honors: August 2, 2007" and "Awards and Honors: December 17, 2007."

Awards and Honors I: July 18, 2008

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Qizhen Cao, PhD, postdoctoral scholar in the Molecular Imaging Probe Laboratory, has received a two-year postdoctoral fellowship from the Tobacco-Related Disease Research Program (TRDRP) for her work on alpha7-nAChR targeted imaging and therapy of lung cancer. Dr. Cao received her PhD in molecular and immunological pharmacology from the Peking University Health Science Center in China, where she specialized in tumor angiogenesis and anti-angiogenesis therapy. In 2005, she joined Dr. Shawn Chen's laboratory, where she develops molecular imaging probes for the treatment monitoring and target therapy of tumor angiogenesis.

Awards and Honors III: July 17, 2008

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Zibo Li, PhD, former postdoctoral scholar in the Molecular Imaging Probe Laboratory (MIPL) and current senior scientist at Siemens Medical Solutions USA, Inc., has received a Travel Award to attend the 55th Society of Nuclear Medicine Annual Meeting. The purpose of the SNM Travel Awards is to provide support to nuclear medicine students for presenting innovative work at the SNM Annual Meeting. While at Stanford, Dr. Li's research focused on the development of novel tracers (peptides, proteins, growth factors, antibodies, and antibody fragments-based) for near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence, MRI, SPECT, and PET imaging of small animal tumor xenografts and, potentially, of cancer patients. For Dr. Li's prior blog award announcements, please access "Awards and Honors: June 15, 2007" and "Awards and Honors: February 5, 2008."

Awards and Honors II: July 17, 2008

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Yingbing Wang, MD, recently graduated medical student from the Multimodality Molecular Imaging Lab, has been selected as the winner of the 2008 Department of Radiology Norman Blank Award for the outstanding medical student in radiology. The award was created in memory of longtime faculty member and Director of Admissions Norman Blank, MD. While at Stanford, Dr. Wang's research interests included the use of integrated fluorine-18-deoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) in managing lymphoma. In the fall, she will begin an internship in internal medicine at Kaiser Permanente Medical Center in Santa Clara, which will be followed by a residency in radiology at Massachusetts General Hospital. Dr. Wang's favorite hobbies include eating Krispy Kreme donuts and watching action movies.

Awards and Honors I: July 17, 2008

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Kai Chen, PhD, research associate in the Molecular Imaging Probe Laboratory, was awarded a third place Society of Nuclear Medicine Young Professionals Committee (YPC) Best Basic Science Award at the 2008 Annual Convention of the Society of Nuclear Medicine. Dr. Chen received his PhD in biophysics from Peking University in Beijing, China. Prior to coming to Stanford, he first served as a postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Medicine at the University of California, San Francisco, and then at the Sealy Center for Cancer Cell Biology at the University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston, Texas. At Stanford, Dr. Chen's research interests include molecular imaging and cancer cell biology. Outside the lab, he enjoys traveling, reading, swimming, and playing "Go" as well as chess.

Awards and Honors II: July 15, 2008

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Chief Resident Pat Auveek Basu, MD, MBA, has received the J.T. Rutherford Government Relations Fellowship from the American College of Radiology (ACR). Dr. Basu is the first Stanford recipient to receive the fellowship and one of six applicants selected nationally. Founded in 1993, the Fellowship was named after J.T. Rutherford, the first lobbyist of the ACR. By meeting with congressional members as well as representatives of federal regulatory agencies in Washington D.C., Fellows will be exposed to the state and federal legislative and regulatory processes that directly affect the future of radiology. During the one-week fellowship program, Dr. Basu will also attend seminars on the governmental process and its impact on the radiological profession as well as learn about the ACR's Governmental Relations Division and other congressional activities.

Dr. Basu currently serves as a member of Stanford's Graduate Medical Education Committee and as course director of the "Health Economics, Finance, and Policy" course offered to Stanford physicians and medical students. He has been invited to speak both nationally and internationally regarding issues of healthcare policy and finance. Prior to coming to Stanford, Dr. Basu served as chief resident during his transitional year at Resurrection Hospital in Chicago. Dr. Basu graduated with honors from the University of Chicago, where he received his MD and MBA. During this time, he was elected president of his business school cohort and the Dean's Council representative of his medical school class. Dr. Basu earned his undergraduate degree in mechanical engineering from the University of Illinois, where he was elected to the University's Senate and Homecoming Court. When he is not working, Dr. Basu loves to play a variety of sports, and he is a die-hard fan of the Chicago Cubs, Bulls, Bears, and Illinois Fighting Illini.

For prior blog entries regarding Dr. Basu's awards and honors, please access the following postings: Awards and Honors: February 2007; Awards and Honors: August 13, 2007; and "Our New Chief Residents for 2008-2009."

Awards and Honors I: July 15, 2008

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Andrei Iagaru, MD, instructor of nuclear medicine, has received the following honors: Alavi-Mandell Award from the Society of Nuclear Medicine; two "Best Essay Awards" at the 2008 American College of Nuclear Physicians (ACNP) Annual Meeting; and featured research in both the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) News Highlights and AuntMinnie.com. The Alavi-Mandell Award is bestowed upon nuclear medicine residents and trainees who publish scientific articles as senior authors in the Journal of Nuclear Medicine. Dr. Iagaru won this award for his paper entitled "Treatment of Thyrotoxicosis," which is published in the Journal of Nuclear Medicine 2007;48(3):379-89. At the ACNP Annual Meeting, Dr. Iagaru received "Best Essay Awards" for "131I-Tositumomab (Bexxar) vs. 90Y-Ibritumomab (Zevalin) in Refractory/Relapsed Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma" and "18F FDG PET/CT in Head and Neck Cancers: What is the Definition of Whole-Body Scanning?" His research is also featured in the 2008 RSNA News Highlights, "PET/CT Effective at Identifying Cervical Cancers, Research Suggests." Most recently, Dr. Iagaru's work appeared twice in AuntMinne.com: "MRI and FDG-PET/CT Recommended for Advanced Breast Cancer" and "PET/CT Shows Its Worth in Cervical Carcinoma."

Dr. Iagaru completed medical school at the Carol Davila University of Medicine, Bucharest, Romania, and an internship at Drexel University College of Medicine, Graduate Hospital, in the Department of Medicine. He began his residency at the University of Southern California (USC) Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles, in the Division of Nuclear Medicine, where he was the chief resident. He finished his residency and completed a PET/CT fellowship at Stanford University's School of Medicine in the Division of Nuclear Medicine. His research interests include whole-body MRI and F-18 PET in osseous metastases detection; the comparison of Zevalin/Bexxar therapy; the optical imaging of breast cancer; and PET-CT imaging for thyroid/breast cancer, melanoma, lymphoma, and sarcoma. In addition to the above awards, Dr. Iagaru has also been selected as the 2008 Clinician Educator of the Year by the Stanford Radiology Residency Program.

Awards and Honors: July 14, 2008

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Hui Wang, PhD, a postdoctoral scholar in the Molecular Imaging Probe Laboratory (MIPL), has been awarded first place from the Society of Nuclear Medicine's Molecular Imaging Center of Excellence for her molecular imaging abstract entitled, "Trafficking the Fate of Mesenchymal Stem Cells In Vivo." Prior to coming to Stanford, Dr. Wang was a postdoctoral fellow at the Chinese Academy of Sciences (Dalian, China) where she researched the design and synthesis of p450 enzymes in the Pichia pastoris system. She received her PhD degree for her work in tumor neovasculature targeted TNF at the Fourth Military Medical University in Xi'an, China. At Stanford, her research focuses on the design, synthesis, and characterization of protein probes for molecular imaging; the ex vivo evolution of VEGF121 protein; the site-specific labeling of tagged proteins; and the trafficking of mesenchymal stem cells by bioluminescence imaging. When Dr. Wang is not working, she enjoys hiking, swimming, and spending time with her family.

Awards and Honors II: July 11, 2008

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Zhaofei (Jeff) Liu, a visiting researcher in the Molecular Imaging Probe Laboratory, has been selected for the 2008 Berson-Yalow Award for his abstract, "Analyzing the Recognition Sites of RGD Peptide on U87MG Tumor Cell Using a Competition Binding Assay." Developed by the Society of Nuclear Medicine (SNM), the Berson-Yalow Award is given to investigators with the most original scientific abstracts who make the most significant contributions to basic or clinical radioassay. Mr. Liu is also a fourth-year PhD candidate at Peking University in Beijing, China, where he studies biophysics. After receiving a joint training scholarship to study at Stanford for one year from the China Scholarship Council (CSC), Mr. Liu took a one-year leave from his PhD program to pursue his research interests in molecular imaging, molecular and cell biology, and immunology under the guidance of Dr. Xiaoyuan Chen in the Molecular Imaging Probe Laboratory. Mr. Liu has also received a Travel Award for the 55th Society of Nuclear Medicine Annual Meeting.

Awards and Honors I: July 11, 2008

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John MacKenzie, MD, MS (on left), assistant professor of pediatric radiology and chief of pediatric musculoskeletal imaging at Lucile Packard Children's Hospital (LPCH), and Dr. Shreyas Vasanawala (on right), assistant professor of radiology as well as director of body magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and co-director of MRI at LPCH, have received a Research and Education Foundation Seed Grant from the Society for Pediatric Radiology for their project entitled "Evaluation of Pediatric Diseases with Hyperpolarized Carbon-13 Magnetic Resonance Imaging." The purpose of their research is to investigate molecular imaging as a new diagnostic tool for childhood disorders. Drs. MacKenzie and Vasanawala will test the feasibility of magnetic resonance imaging using hyperpolarized carbon-13 for the diagnosis and monitoring of childhood musculoskeletal and liver disease.

Dr. MacKenzie's other research interests include molecular imaging applications for bone and joint disorders. Dr. Vasanawala is developing new MRI techniques for body imaging by increasing the speed of MRI and developing novel MR methods for probing metabolism. For more biographical information, please access earlier blog postings on Dr. MacKenzie and Dr. Vasanawala.

Awards and Honors: July 9, 2008

Zongjin Li.jpgZongjin Li, PhD, MD, postdoctoral scholar in the Cardiovascular Gene and Cell Therapy Laboratory, is the recipient of five honors: a Travel Award to attend the 2008 International Society for Stem Cell Research (ISSCR) Annual Meeting; an American College of Cardiology Foundation (ACCF)/Bristol-Myers Squibb Travel Award from the American College of Cardiology; a finalist for the Young Investigators Awards Competition of the American College of Cardiology; an honorable mention in the Young Investigator of the Year Award Competition from the Stanford University School of Medicine Cardiovascular Institute; and a Mitzi and William Blahd, MD, Pilot Research Grant. Sponsored by the Education and Research Foundation for the Society of Nuclear Medicine, the Mitzi and William Blahd, MD, Pilot Research Grant is designed to support innovative ideas in clinical and basic research and is awarded to the highest-ranked proposal.

Dr. Li received his PhD degree from Peking Union Medical College in Beijing, China, and his MD degree from the Norman Bethune University of Medical Sciences in Changchun, China. At the Rizhao Hygiene College in China, he completed both his internship and residency in internal medicine and served as an attending physician in the Department of Cardiovascular Medicine. In September of 2005, Dr. Li joined Dr. Wu's Cardiovascular Gene and Cell Therapy Laboratory, where he researches the molecular imaging of stem cells for cardiovascular applications.

Awards and Honors: July 8, 2008

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Adam de la Zerda, PhD candidate in the Multimodality Molecular Imaging Laboratory (MMIL), has won two awards in support of his PhD progress: the Bio-X Graduate Student Fellowship and the Department of Defense (DOD) Breast Cancer Research Program (BCRP) Predoctoral Traineeship Award. The Bio-X Graduate Student Fellowship is intended to support graduate students training in the interdisciplinary biosciences, creating new advances in science and engineering. The fellowship is awarded to promising graduate students based on their talent, potential, and commitment to research. The Breast Cancer Research Program (BCRP) Predoctoral Traineeship Award supports the training of graduate students studying towards careers in breast cancer research. Mentored by Dr. Gambhir, Mr. de la Zerda researches photoacoustic molecular imaging and its broad applications for breast cancer. He holds a number of publications and patents and is also a professional reviewer for Nature Nanotechnology and Medical Physics.

Prior to coming to Stanford, Mr. de la Zerda received his BScs in computer science, electrical engineering, and physics from the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology in Haifa, Israel. For Mr. de la Zerda's prior award announcement regarding the Bay Area Entrepreneurship Contest, please access
http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2007/06/awards_and_hono_6.html.

Awards and Honors: July 3, 2008

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Priti Balchandani, PhD, postdoctoral scholar in the Radiological Sciences Laboratory (RSL), was a finalist for the I.I. Rabi Young Investigator Award at the 2008 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine (ISMRM) Annual Meeting. Named after Nobel Laureate Isidor I. Rabi, the Rabi Award honors "achievements in basic scientific research, especially focusing on novel technical developments." Out of the 38 abstracts on basic research, Dr. Balchandani's abstract was 1 of 3 chosen as a finalist. Her abstract featured her research in adiabatic RF pulse design. Along with her colleagues, Dr. Balchandani has developed the slice-selective tunable-flip adiabatic low peak-power excitation (STABLE) pulse. To read more about her award and research, please access "Young Investigator Awards Add Luster to MRI's Scientific Stars" featured online in the "Diagnostic Imaging ISMRM Conference Reporter." Dr. Balchandani's research interests include the development of high-field MR anatomic and spectroscopic imaging tools and novel RF pulse design for positive-contrast imaging of cells labeled with SPIO nanoparticles and sodium imaging of the brain at 7T.

Dr. Balchandani received her BS in computer engineering from the University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Canada, and completed her MS and PhD in electrical engineering at Stanford.

Awards and Honors: June 24, 2008

Gambhir.jpgDr. Sanjiv Sam Gambhir, MD, PhD, director of the Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford (MIPS), professor of Radiology and Bioengineering, and head of the Nuclear Medicine Division, has received two honors: the Tesla Medal and induction into the American Society of Clinical Investigation (ASCI). Dr. Gambhir was awarded the Tesla Medal from the United Kingdom Royal College of Radiologists (RCR) for his research in the multimodality molecular imaging of living subjects. Established in England, the RCR can trace its beginnings to the Roentgen Society, which was founded in 1897. The Royal College of Radiologists (RCR) has approximately 7,600 members and Fellows all over the world whose goal is to advance the science and practice of radiology and oncology. Dr. Gambhir received his second honor at the one hundred year anniversary of the American Society of Clinical Investigation (ASCI) in 2008. At this anniversary meeting, Dr. Gambhir was inducted as a member of the ASCI, which is an honor society for physician-scientists. Election to the ASCI is an "extraordinary honor in academic medicine and industry" and is bestowed upon those who have achieved "significant accomplishments at a relatively early age." The ASCI is dedicated to advancing the research of human disease and to mentoring future generations of physician-scientists.

Dr. Gambhir has over 20 years of experience in molecular imaging in both animal models and patients. He has an active laboratory, with over 20 postdoctoral fellows and graduate students, that focuses on developing molecular imaging assays in small animal models for translation into clinical applications. Dr. Gambhir also has over 270 publications in the field of molecular imaging and leads several large NCI-funded programs, such as the In Vivo Cellular Molecular Imaging Center (ICMIC); the Center for Nanotechnology Excellence Focused on Therapy Response (CCNE-TR); and the Stanford Molecular Imaging Scholars (SMIS) Program. Dr. Gambhir is a member of the NCI Scientific Advisory Board; is past president (2006) of the Academy of Molecular Imaging; and serves on the board of several other societies. He is also on the editorial boards of several journals.

Awards and Honors: June 23, 2008

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Joseph Wu, MD, PhD, assistant professor of medicine (cardiology) and radiology, has been selected as a 2008 Baxter Faculty Scholar. The Donald E. and Delia B. Baxter Foundation Faculty Scholar Program Awards provide support to new assistant professors to help in the early stages of their research careers. To learn more about Dr. Wu's research, please visit his lab at http://mips.stanford.edu/research/lab?lab%5fid=2883.

Awards and Honors: June 23, 2008

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Michael Zeineh, MD, PhD, neuroradiology fellow, has been awarded a research fellow grant from the Radiological Society of North America Research and Education Foundation for his project, "Ultra-High Resolution Clinical Imaging of the Human Medial Temporal Lobe with 7T MRI." Dr. Zeineh has just finished his radiology residency in our Department. He completed his internship as well as received his medical and graduate degrees at the University of California, Los Angeles, (UCLA). Dr. Zeineh is also a GE Radiology Seed Funding Recipient and received the 2003 Emil Bogen Research Prize in recognition of his work. His current research interests include the development and application of ultra-high resolution 7T MRI of the human medial temporal lobe with clinical applications to Alzheimer's disease and epilepsy.

Awards and Honors: June 12, 2008

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David Wang, MD, third-year radiology resident, has won a research seed grant from the Radiological Society of North America Research and Education Foundation for his project, "Ultrasound-Mediated Suicide Gene Therapy with Molecularly Targeted Microbubbles in a Murine Model of Tumor Angiogenesis." Dr. Wang will pursue this project under the residency program's newly established research track and will take a six-month sabbatical from his residency training to work in the laboratories of Drs. Juergen Willmann and Sanjiv Gambhir. Prior to residency, Dr. Wang received his medical degree from Stanford and was a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Fellow. As a medical student, he founded and managed Pacific Free Clinic, a volunteer-run health clinic that offers basic healthcare services and onsite interpretation to low-income immigrants in Santa Clara County. The Clinic is currently in its fifth year of operation and has served thousands of patients. After residency, Dr. Wang plans to pursue a career in academic radiology.

Awards and Honors: May 22, 2008

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Juergen K. Willmann, MD, assistant professor of radiology (abdominal imaging), has received a research seed grant from the Radiological Society of North America Research and Education Foundation for his project, "Development and Validating of a Multi-Targeted Contrast Agent for Contrast Enhanced Ultrasound Imaging of Tumor Angiogenesis in Early-Stage Pancreatic Cancer." Prior to becoming an assistant professor at Stanford, Dr. Willmann was a research fellow in the Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford (MIPS) while concurrently an assistant professor of diagnostic radiology at the Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital Zurich, Switzerland. He received his MD from the Albert-Ludwigs-University Freiburg, Germany, and was the chief resident of diagnostic radiology at the University Hospital Zurich, Switzerland. In 2007, Dr. Willmann received the RSNA Trainee Research Fellow Award for his research project, "Molecular Imaging of Therapeutic Angiogenesis in Murine Hindlimb Ischemia Using PET and 64Cu-labeled Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor121." His research interests include multimodality molecular imaging of angiogenesis and stem cell therapy and the development of new ultrasonic imaging approaches for the early detection of cancer. When he is not working, Dr. Willmann enjoys fitness training, hiking, and playing the piano.

Awards and Honors: April 30, 2008

Fahrig_100.gif Rebecca Fahrig, PhD, assistant professor of radiology, has been selected as one of sixteen School of Medicine Faculty Fellows for 2008. Over the next year, the Fellows will meet monthly for leadership meetings with invited faculty who will serve as role models. In addition, they will attend small mentoring groups led by senior faculty mentors and will devise a career development plan. The Faculty Fellows were nominated by their departmental chairs and were ranked by the Faculty Fellow Review Committee based on their "leadership potential and demonstrated commitment to building diversity."

Before joining our Department as an assistant professor, Dr. Fahrig completed her PhD in medical biophysics at the University of Western Ontario and a postdoctoral fellowship at Stanford University. She has won numerous awards including the Greenfield Award for the Best Paper (nonradiation dosimetry) published in Medical Physics in 2005; the Fellowship Research Trainee Prize (along with Zhu, PhD, candidate) from the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) Physics Subcommittee; and the Faculty Scholar in Translational Research Award from the Baxter Foundation. Dr. Fahrig's research focuses on imaging for guidance of minimally invasive procedures. She works on software and hardware that permit the use of a C-arm system for both fluoroscopy and CT imaging, and she has extended the applications of C-arm CT to retrospectively gated 3D/4D cardiac imaging in the interventional suite. She is also developing an MR-compatible X-ray fluoroscopy system, including a new rotating-anode X-ray tube for use in the fringe fields of 1.5T and 3.0T magnets.

Awards and Honors: April 18, 2008

Sandip Biswal, MD, assistant professor of radiology; Sheen-Woo Lee, MD, MSc, postdoctoral scholar; Shin Kamaya, BSE; Deepak Behera, DNB, postdoctoral fellow; Edward Graves, PhD, assistant professor of radiation oncology (radiation physics); and Garry Gold, MD, associate professor of radiology and, by courtesy, of bioengineering and orthopaedic surgery, were awarded the Moncada Award at the 31st Annual Meeting of the Society of Computed Body Tomography and Magnetic Resonance (SCBT/MR) for their outstanding research project "Imaging Pain and Nociception with Manganese-Enhanced MRI (MEMRI)." The Moncada Award was named in honor of Rogelio Moncada, MD, who helped establish the SCBT/MR research awards program. Please find photos and brief biographies of some of our award winners below.


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Deepak Behera, diplomate of National Board (DNB), specialized in nuclear medicine from Medwin Hospitals in Hyderabad, India, after receiving his medical degree (MBBS) from MKCG Medical College in Orissa, India. Before coming to Stanford, he served as senior resident in the nuclear medicine clinics at PGIMER in Chandigarh, India. Dr. Behera is currently a postdoctoral fellow in the Molecular Imaging of Musculoskeletal Illnesses (MIMI) Laboratory where he is investigating a clinically applicable nociception imaging agent that has applications in both cancerous and noncancerous conditions. Outside the lab, he enjoys traveling, outdoor sports, dancing, and singing.

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Sandip Biswal, MD, assistant professor of radiology, received his medical degree from Harvard Medical School-Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) Division of Health Science and Technology (HST). As a faculty member at Stanford, he was won the Junior Faculty of the Year Resident Teaching Award twice and the RSNA Research Trainee Prize three times: once each in Informatics and Nuclear Medicine with Bao Do, MD, and once in Nuclear Medicine with Brian Kim, MD. Dr. Biswal is the leader of the Molecular Imaging of Musculoskeletal Illnesses (MIMI) Laboratory, where he researches the use of multimodality molecular imaging techniques to study nociception as it relates to bones, joints, the peripheral nervous system, and the spinal cord.


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Garry E. Gold, MD, associate professor of radiology and (by courtesy) bioengineering and orthopedics at Stanford University, received a master's degree in electrical engineering from Stanford in 1988 and his MD from Stanford in 1992. Dr. Gold has authored over 60 journal articles, 170 abstracts, and 5 patents in MRI. He has been the principal investigator or a co-investigator on over 30 funded research projects, and he is the principal investigator on two NIH-funded projects to improve MR imaging of osteoarthritis and the use of real-time MRI for the study of biomechanics. The International Skeletal Society recently awarded Dr. Gold the President's Medal. He is also a five-time winner of the Lauterbur Award for the best MRI paper from the Society for Computed Body Tomography and Magnetic Resonance (SCBT/MR). Dr. Gold reviews manuscripts for ten peer-reviewed journals, including the Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (JMRI) and the journal of Magnetic Resonance in Medicine (MRM), and he is on the editorial board of several publications. At Stanford, Dr. Gold practices clinical musculoskeletal radiology, teaching medical students, residents, and fellows. He teaches two courses in imaging physics and human anatomy for medical students and graduate students, and he was recently awarded the Kaiser Award for outstanding and innovative contributions to education. He also serves as an advisor and co-advisor for many engineering graduate students and postdoctoral fellows.

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Edward "Ted" Graves, PhD, assistant professor of radiation oncology (radiation physics), received his PhD in bioengineering in 2001 from the University of California, Berkeley, and San Francisco. After completing a postdoctoral fellowship in molecular imaging at Massachusetts General Hospital in Charlestown, Massachusetts, he came to Stanford in 2003 as an acting assistant professor of radiation oncology and joined the Department as an assistant professor in 2004. Dr. Graves has received numerous awards, including NIH-postdoctoral training grants and first prize in the student poster competition of the International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine (ISMRM) Cancer Workshop. At Stanford, his research interests focus on developing applications of emerging functional and molecular imaging techniques in the radiation therapy of cancer. Dr. Graves' current research projects include the development and application of techniques for imaging radiobiology, focusing on tumor hypoxia; the engineering of methods for applying clinically-relevant conformal irradiation to small animal models of disease; and the creation of software for multimodality image analysis and quantitation. In his time away from Stanford, Dr. Graves enjoys playing video games and with his dog, Tara, as well as supporting the Chelsea Football Club.


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Shin Kamaya, BSE, grew up in Salt Lake City, Utah, and received his undergraduate degree in mechanical engineering from the University of Pennsylvania. He is currently a third-year medical student at the University of Colorado-Denver.

Awards and Honors: April 17, 2008

Brian Hargreaves, PhD, assistant professor of radiology; Neal Bangerter, PhD, research associate; Ernesto Staroswiecki, PhD; Paul Gurney, PhD; Thomas Grafendorfer, scientific staff; Anderson Nnewihe, MS; Bruce Daniel, MD, associate professor of radiology; and Garry Gold, MD, associate professor of radiology and, by courtesy, of bioengineering and orthopaedic surgery, were awarded the Lauterbur Award by the Society of Computed Body Tomography and Magnetic Resonance (SCBT/MR) for their outstanding research project "Co-Registered Sodium and Proton MRI of Osteoarthritis and Breast Cancer." The Lauterbur Award in MR was named in honor of Paul Lauterbur, PhD, who was awarded the Nobel Prize in 2003 for his work in MRI. Please find photos and brief biographies of some of our award winners below.

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Neal Bangerter, PhD, received his doctoral degree from the Department of Electrical Engineering at Stanford University. He has held positions in both industry and academia. His academic work has focused on the development of new, fast imaging techniques for MRI and the development of sodium imaging methods for musculoskeletal and other applications. Dr. Bangerter is currently working in industry, developing product strategy for a Silicon Valley start-up.

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Garry E. Gold, MD, associate professor of radiology and (by courtesy) bioengineering and orthopedics at Stanford University, received a master's degree in electrical engineering from Stanford in 1988 and his MD from Stanford in 1992. Dr. Gold has authored over 60 journal articles, 170 abstracts, and 5 patents in MRI. He has been the principal investigator or a co-investigator on over 30 funded research projects, and he is the principal investigator on two NIH-funded projects to improve MR imaging of osteoarthritis and the use of real-time MRI for the study of biomechanics. The International Skeletal Society recently awarded Dr. Gold the President's Medal. He is also a five-time winner of the Lauterbur Award for the best MRI paper from the Society for Computed Body Tomography and Magnetic Resonance (SCBT/MR). Dr. Gold reviews manuscripts for ten peer-reviewed journals, including the Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (JMRI) and the journal of Magnetic Resonance in Medicine (MRM), and he is on the editorial board of several publications. At Stanford, Dr. Gold practices clinical musculoskeletal radiology, teaching medical students, residents, and fellows. He teaches two courses in imaging physics and human anatomy for medical students and graduate students, and he was recently awarded the Kaiser Award for outstanding and innovative contributions to education. He also serves as an advisor and co-advisor for many engineering graduate students and postdoctoral fellows.

Paul Gurney, PhD, received his doctoral degree in electrical engineering from Stanford in June of 2007. His research includes work in rapid 3-dimensional MRI and coronary angiography.

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Brian Hargreaves, PhD, assistant professor of radiology, completed his doctoral degree in electrical engineering at Stanford University. In 2001, he joined the Stanford Radiology Department faculty. Dr. Hargreaves' research focuses on body magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) applications (including abdominal, vascular, breast, and musculoskeletal imaging) and the development of novel excitation schemes, efficient imaging methods, and reconstruction tools that provide improved diagnostic contrast compared with current methods. Aside from work, he plays ice hockey and soccer, and he is on the volunteer ski patrol at Sugar Bowl ski resort.

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Anderson Nnewihe, MS, is working on hardware design for the multinuclear imaging of the breast and the knee. In 2005, he graduated from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) with a BS degree in electrical engineering; in 2007, he received an MS degree in bioengineering at Stanford, where he is currently a PhD candidate in the Department of Bioengineering. His goals are to translate his research on multinuclear imaging to the clinical setting to expedite scans, improve image resolution, and facilitate diagnosis. He also has a marked interest in health care for his home country, Nigeria.

Awards and Honors: April 9, 2008

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Sandra Rodriguez, RT (R)(MR), MR research technologist, was awarded the Howard S. Stern Scholarship from the American Society of Radiologic Technologists (ASRT) Education and Research Foundation. Out of 450 applicants, Ms. Rodriguez was 1 of 8 who were chosen for the award. The Howard S. Stern Scholarship is designed to help radiologic technologists obtain an associate, bachelor's, or graduate degree or to complete additional certification in medical imaging, radiation therapy, or medical dosimetry. Ms. Rodriguez is currently enrolled in the Bachelor of Science in Health Administration (BSHA) online program through the University of Phoenix. She anticipates receiving her degree in the 2008/2009 academic year and continuing her education by attaining a master's degree in Health Administration.

Awards and Honors: April 3, 2008

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William T. Kuo, MD, assistant professor of vascular and interventional radiology, has been elected to Fellow of the American College of Chest Physicians (FCCP). Dr. Kuo will be inducted into Fellowship at the convocation ceremony of the American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP) during their annual CHEST meeting in October 2008. To be elected to Fellowship in the ACCP, a physician must be board certified in his or her respective subspecialty and devote a significant amount of clinical and research time to treating and studying cardiopulmonary disease. Dr. Kuo's election to Fellow is a significant achievement in his professional career that also recognizes his expertise in the endovascular treatment of acute pulmonary embolism, as a specialist in vascular and interventional radiology. Following his election to Fellow of the ACCP, Dr. Kuo was also invited to deliver a lecture at the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regarding the safety and efficacy of catheter-directed therapy for acute pulmonary embolism. For Dr. Kuo's biography, please access an earlier award posting at http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2007/02/new_faculty_hir_1.html.

Awards and Honors: March 27, 2008

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Arne Vandenbroucke, PhD, postdoctoral scholar in the Molecular Imaging Instrumentation Laboratory (MIIL), received the Henri Benedictus Fellowship from the Belgian American Educational Foundation (BAEF) and the King Baudouin Foundation. The BAEF promotes the exchange of scientists and students between the US and Belgium. The Henri Benedictus Fellowship is awarded to scientists whose research is in the field of biomedical engineering. Dr. Vandenbroucke is working on the design of a high sensitivity, high resolution PET scanner for breast cancer imaging; the fellowship will allow him to continue this work. He was selected for the Henri Benedictus fellowship after he defended his research in front of 15 scientists in Brussels, Belgium, in January of 2008. For Dr. Vandenbroucke's biography please access an earlier award posting at http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2007/12/awards_and_hono_23.html.

Awards and Honors: March 26, 2008

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Norbert Pelc, ScD, professor of radiology and bioengineering and, by courtesy, electrical engineering, has been elected to Fellow of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM). Dr. Pelc was awarded this honor for his distinguished contributions to the advancement of medical physics knowledge based upon independent original research or development and for his medical physics educational activities, especially in regard to the education and training of medical physicists, medical students, medical residents, and allied health personnel. The director of the Radiological Sciences Laboratory as well as professor of radiology and, by courtesy, of electrical engineering and of psychology, Dr. Gary Glover, commented that "[a] few people make major contributions to one or two diagnostic modalities in their lifetimes; Norbert is remarkable in that he has contributed outstanding achievements in virtually all fields of diagnostic imaging and is thereby internationally known as a thought leader in basic radiological science, education, and research policy at Stanford. We can all be proud of Norbert and delight in this fine recognition of our colleague's lifetime accomplishments." Dr. Pelc will be honored at an awards ceremony and reception at the July 2008 AAPM meeting in Houston, Texas.

(Image courtesy of Mark Riesenberger)

Awards and Honors: March 3, 2008

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(Drs. Ganguly and Pelc)

Arundhuti (Arun) Ganguly, PhD, research associate, received an Honorable Mention Award for her poster entitled "On the Angular Distribution of Bremsstrahlung" at the 2008 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE) "Physics of Medical Imaging" Conference in San Diego in February of 2008. She co-authored this poster and an associated conference paper with Professor Norbert Pelc. Only five candidates were selected for this award out of 120 submissions. Working with Professors Rebecca Fahrig, PhD, and Norbert Pelc, PhD, Dr. Ganguly has been a research associate in Radiology since 2004. She has also received the Sylvia Sorkin Greenfield Co-Author Award for the Best Paper in Medical Physics (2005), and she was a co-recipient of the Young Investigator Award from the Association for Advancement of Medical Instrumentation (AAMI) in 2004. Prior to becoming a research associate, Dr. Ganguly was a postdoctoral fellow at Stanford working with Professors Fahrig and Pelc. Dr. Ganguly received her doctoral degree from the State University of New York (SUNY) Buffalo, New York, in physics. While at Stanford, she has participated in the development of a truly hybrid X-ray/MR system at Stanford. Her primary interest is in the development of image-guidance technologies for minimally invasive procedures. Her current research includes the development of imaging protocols using a C-arm CT system, the synthesis of novel targeted imaging contrast agents, and X-ray detector development work.

Awards and Honors: February 19, 2008

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The research of the Cardiovascular Molecular Imaging Lab was recently featured on the cover of the Journal of Nuclear Medicine (December 1, 2007, v. 48:12). The cover highlights their work on the comparison of imaging techniques for tracking cardiac stem cell therapy. To view their abstract from the Journal of Nuclear Medicine, please access http://jnm.snmjournals.org/cgi/content/full/48/12/1916. Members of the lab research cardiovascular molecular imaging of stem cell transplantation and gene therapy using different molecular markers.

Awards and Honors: February 12, 2008

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The Journal of the American College of Cardiology (JACC) recently featured research from the Multimodality Molecular Imaging Lab (MMIL) and the Yock lab on the cover of their February 5, 2008, V. 51:5 issue. To view their abstract from this issue on the noninvasive imaging of reporter genes after percutaneous delivery in swine, please access http://content.onlinejacc.org/cgi/content/full/51/5/595. Members of MMIL are developing imaging assays to interrogate cells for mRNA levels, cell surface antigens, intracellular proteins, and protein-protein interactions using technologies such as micro positron emission tomography (microPET), bioluminescence optical imaging, fluorescence optical imaging, micro computerized axial tomography (microCAT), ultrasound, and photoacoustics.

Awards and Honors: February 8, 2008

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Natesh Parashurama, MD, PhD, postdoctoral scholar in the Multimodality Molecular Imaging Lab (MMIL), has received two awards: a Speaker and Travel Award for the Stem Cell Bioengineering Conference (American Institute of Chemical Engineers AICHE) and a 2008-2009 Dean's Fellowship for his proposal, "Molecular Imaging of the Cardiac Stem Cell Niche." Dr. Parashurama received his BS in chemical engineering from MIT; his medical degree from the State University of New York at Buffalo; his PhD in chemical engineering from Rutgers University, New Jersey; and a three-year graduate research fellowship at Harvard Medical School. Dr. Parashurama's research interests include applying quantitative molecular imaging tools to study cell proliferation and differentiation; cell function; the cellular micro-environment; cell trafficking and homing; the immune response; and cell therapy-mediated gene therapy.

Awards and Honors: February 6, 2008

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Hao Peng, PhD, postdoctoral scholar in the Molecular Imaging Instrumentation Laboratory (MIIL), has been awarded a 2008-2009 Dean's Postdoctoral Fellowship for his proposal, "Investigation of a Miniature PET Camera Insert Dedicated to Simultaneous PET/MRI Mammography and MRI-guided Biopsy." Dr. Peng completed his BS and MS degrees at Wuhan University, China, in applied physics. He received his PhD at the University of Western Ontario, Canada, from the Medical Physics Program. Dr. Peng's current research interests include the creation of breast cancer-dedicated positron emission tomography (PET) cameras using avalanche photodiode (APD) and cadmium-zinc-telluride (CZT) semiconductor detectors as well as the development of a simultaneous PET/MRI dual modality scanner that can improve diagnosis accuracy and facilitate MRI-guided biopsy. When he is not working, he loves to play tennis and basketball.

Awards and Honors: February 5, 2008

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Zibo Li, PhD, postdoctoral scholar in the Molecular Imaging Probe Laboratory (MIPL), has received the Benedict Cassen Postdoctoral Fellowship from the Society of Nuclear Medicine (SNM), which is granted to recipients who have an excellent record and exceptional research ability. Dr. Li's research focuses on the development of novel tracers (peptides, proteins, growth factors, antibodies, and antibody fragments-based) for near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence, MRI, SPECT, and PET imaging of small animal tumor xenografts and, potentially, of cancer patients.

Awards and Honors: January 3, 2008

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Yvonne Casillas, RT, RIS/PACS system analyst, received the October Wingspread Award from the former recipient, Linn Dee Barrientos, CRT. The Wingspread Award gives employees the opportunity to recognize who among them has gone above and beyond the fulfillment of his or her usual duties. Wingspread awardees can keep the award for as long as they wish or until they discover another "special performer." Monthly awarding of the Wingspread honor is encouraged as part of the SHC departmental staff meetings. Ms. Casillas grew up in Chicago, the youngest of five children. She graduated from a hospital-based RT program at Cook County Hospital in Chicago, which is not only one of the most recognized trauma departments in the country, but is also the model upon which the fictional hospital of County General Hospital from the NBC serial medical drama "ER" is based. Ms. Casillas added that her experience at Cook County Hospital in Chicago "was truly one of the best experiences I ever had. There was never a dull moment." She also worked for the University of Illinois at Chicago Hospital and Northwestern Memorial Hospital as a CT technologist. She moved to San Francisco from Chicago two years ago and is currently living in Pacifica, which she enjoys because of its proximity to the beach. At Stanford, she has worked as a CT technologist performing CT examinations; assisted physicians during special procedures; and supervised staff. She is currently working in radiology administration as a systems analyst on the newly upgraded RIS/PACS system. She was originally brought on the team to help train users and to build and test the system before its implementation, and she continues to remain as a support for both RIS/PACS applications. Because of her outstanding work in radiology, Ms. Casillas was awarded the Wingspread Award, which is given by one employee to another who has proven that he or she is a "special performer" by demonstrating exemplary performance in areas such as job knowledge; work ethics; communication skills; inter- and intradepartmental relationships; versatility; and judgment. When she is not working, her hobbies include dance, specifically Hula Hoop dance. Her motto is "Think Green!"

Awards and Honors: December 17, 2007

2007 IEEE (Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers) Medical Imaging Travel Grant Winners Frances Lau, MS, Peter Olcott, and Guillem Pratx, MS, were awarded travel grants to present their novel and original work at the 2007 IEEE NSS-MIC (Nuclear Science Symposium and Medical Imaging) Conference in Honolulu, Hawaii.

Lau.jpgFrances Lau, MS, graduate student in the Molecular Imaging Instrumentation Laboratory (MIIL), gave an oral presentation at the 2007 IEEE NSS-MIC Conference on the different methods for simplifying the circuits in the data acquisition system she and her colleagues are developing for a 1mm3 resolution breast-dedicated PET system. Ms. Lau's research interests include circuits and devices for biomedical applications; she is currently working on the design and development of hardware for a breast cancer imaging PET system.


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Peter Olcott, graduate student in the Bioengineering Department and member of the Molecular Imaging Instrumentation Laboratory, gave a talk at the 2007 IEEE NSS-MIC Conference entitled Data Acquisition System Design for a 1 mm3 Resolution PSAPD-Based PET System that describes the data acquisition architecture he and his colleagues are developing for a new PET mammography system. Because of his strong presentation skills and the rating of his presentation abstract as the fourth highest, Mr. Olcott was one of two runners up for the two Best Student Paper Awards, which recognize contributions to the fields of nuclear and plasma sciences. Mr. Olcott graduated with a BS in computer science from the University of California, San Diego, in 2003. This fall 2007, he expects to receive his MS from Stanford in bioengineering and, subsequently, to begin the PhD bioengineering program. His current research interests include the development of an intra-operative hand-held gamma ray camera (nuclear imager) for the surgical staging of cancer; data acquisition systems for application specific (PET mammography) PET systems; and a new PET detector design for high-field simultaneous PET/MRI imaging. Mr. Olcott adds the following: "I have a 3-year-old son, and I spend all of my free time being a new parent. I love to play tennis, softball, and basketball, and members of Lucas/Radiology are quite welcome to send me unannounced requests to play these sports."


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Guillem Pratx, MS, doctoral candidate in electrical engineering and member of the Molecular Imaging Instrumentation Laboratory, was also awarded a 2007 IEEE Medical Imaging Travel Grant to present his work at the 2007 IEEE NSS-MIC Conference in Honolulu, Hawaii. Mr. Pratx completed his undergraduate work in engineering at the Ecole Centrale in Paris, France. In the Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford (MIPS), he is completing his dissertation research, which centers on the development of practical algorithms that exploit graphics processing units (GPU) for fast medical image reconstruction in ultra-high resolution PET systems under development at Stanford. In support of his work, he has received several awards, including the NVIDIA Fellowship, the Society of Nuclear Medicine Bradley-Alavi Student Fellowship, and the Stanford Bio-X Graduate Student Fellowship.


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A picture from the IEEE Luau, from left to right: Peter Olcott's son; Peter Olcott; Arne Vandenbroucke, PhD; Frances Lau, MS; James Matteson, PhD (Univ. of California, San Diego); Craig Levin, PhD; Guillem Pratx, MS; David Starfield, PhD candidate (Univ. of Witwatersrand, Johannesburg); Yi Gu; and Paul Reynolds.


Awards and Honors: December 10, 2007

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Arne Vandenbroucke, PhD, postdoctoral scholar in the Molecular Imaging Instrumentation Laboratory (MIIL), was awarded an IEEE (Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers) Scholarship to attend a short course at the 2007 IEEE NSS-MIC (Nuclear Science Symposium and Medical Imaging) Conference. Dr. Vandenbroucke earned his PhD in experimental particle physics from Gent University in Belgium. Before coming to Stanford, he worked on the HERMES experiment, researching the spin structure of the nucleon at the DESY (Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron or the "German Electron Synchrotron") in Hamburg, Germany. As part of Dr. Levin's group at Stanford, his research interests include medical imaging, especially PET. Dr. Vandenbroucke is currently involved in the research and development of a dedicated high-resolution breast cancer imaging PET system. When he is not in the lab, he likes spending his time outdoors sailing, hiking, and traveling.

Awards and Honors: December 4, 2007

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Gang Niu, PhD, postdoctoral scholar in the Molecular Imaging Probe Laboratory (MIPL), has been awarded the Department of Defense (DOD) Prostate Cancer Training Award through the DOD's Prostate Cancer Research Program (PCRP). PCRP Training Awards are designed to fund innovative, high-impact research by scientists whose achievements reflect their potential for successful training and who are committed to a career in prostate cancer research. Dr. Niu received the award for his original research in Hsp90 targeted imaging and therapy. He has been working at MIPL under the supervision of Dr. Xiaoyuan Chen since 2006 after receiving his PhD in free radical radiation biology at the University of Iowa, Iowa City, in 2005. His PhD research focused on molecular imaging and tumor gene therapy mediated by the human sodium iodide symporter (hNIS), investigating the role of hNIS as a reporter gene monitoring gene transfer and expression. His current research interests include the investigation of tumor initiation and the progress and response to various therapies with non-invasive molecular imaging strategies including optical and radiological modalities.

Awards and Honors: December 3, 2007

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Juergen K. Willmann, MD, research fellow in the Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford (MIPS), has received the 2007 RSNA Trainee Research Fellow Award for his research project, "Molecular Imaging of Therapeutic Angiogenesis in Murine Hindlimb Ischemia Using PET and 64Cu-labeled Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor121." This Award was created in 1994 by the RSNA Program Committee to recognize the contribution of investigators to the RSNA Scientific Assembly and Annual Meeting. Dr. Willmann has been a research fellow in MIPS since 2006, and he is concurrently an assistant professor of diagnostic radiology at the Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital Zurich, Switzerland. He received his MD from the Albert-Ludwigs-University Freiburg, Germany, and was the chief resident of diagnostic radiology at the University Hospital Zurich, Switzerland. In 2005, Dr. Willmann received the "venia legendi" from the University of Zurich, Switzerland. His research interests include multi-modality molecular imaging of angiogenesis and stem cell therapy and the development of new imaging probes for the early detection of cancer.

Awards and Honors: November 6, 2007

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Linn Dee Barrientos, CRT, clinical instructor of radiology, received the September Stanford Hospital and Clinics Radiology Wingspread Award from the former recipient, Suzanne Campanile, CRT, ARRT, R, M, BS. Because of her outstanding work in diagnostic radiology, Ms. Barrientos was awarded the Wingspread Award, which is given by one employee to another who has proven that he or she is a "special performer" by demonstrating exemplary performance in areas such as job knowledge; work ethics; communication skills; inter- and intradepartmental relationships; versatility; and judgment. The Wingspread Award gives employees the opportunity to recognize who among them has gone above and beyond the fulfillment of his or her usual duties. Wingspread awardees can keep the award for as long as they wish or until they discover another "special performer." Monthly awarding of the Wingspread honor is encouraged as part of the SHC departmental staff meetings.

Ms. Barrientos graduated from Mt. San Antonio College in 1999 with an AA in liberal arts and an AS in radiological sciences after making the Dean's list. In 2007, she graduated cum laude with a BS in Business Management from Menlo College, where she was a member of the Delta Mu Delta International Honor Society of Business Administration. For over four years, Ms. Barrientos has been a full-time radiology technologist at Stanford Hospital and Clinics, where she had the privilege to serve as the day-shift lead technologist and clinical instructor for the Foothill Radiologic Student Program at Stanford. As the lead technologist, she managed the day shift for the diagnostic department, operating room, gastroenterology clinic, emergency department, Blake Wilbur Clinic, orthopedic outpatient clinic for Stanford Hospital, and the Cancer Center. Currently, she is working as a RIS analyst with the Informatics Radiology Team to implement the RIS-IC ImageCast system and to maintain and build support for the database. She has been working on this project for the last 14 months and comments that it is "by far the best opportunity Stanford has offered me. I enjoy the excitement, challenges, and learning opportunities Radiology has to offer." During her free time, she enjoys playing the piano, eating desserts, and tasting full-bodied red wines. Her best friend of seven years is her dog, Rusty.

(Image courtesy of Mark Riesenberger)

Awards and Honors: November 2, 2007

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Bao Do, MD, a postdoctoral fellow in the Molecular Imaging of Musculoskeletal Illnesses Laboratory and a radiology resident at the University of Iowa (left), and Sandip Biswal, MD, assistant professor of radiology (right), have been awarded the RSNA Research Trainee Prize in Informatics for their scientific paper entitled, "Feedback Natural Language Processing of Fractures in Unstructured Reports of Emergency Department Studies." The Trainee Prize was created in 1994 by the RSNA Program Committee to recognize the contribution of residents to the RSNA Scientific Assembly and Annual Meeting. Each subcommittee of the Program Committee awards three prizes each year for the best paper or poster submitted by a resident, fellow, or medical student. This is the second time Drs. Biswal and Do have received the Trainee Prize; they received their first one in 2005 in the category of molecular imaging.

Awards and Honors: October 23, 2007

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Garry E. Gold, MD, associate professor of radiology, was recently awarded the President's Medal for Outstanding Research in Bone and Joint Disease at the 2007 meeting of the International Skeletal Society. The President's Medal is given to members of the International Skeletal Society in honor of their outstanding scientific achievements on an international level. Recipients also receive a monetary award to support their research efforts.

Awards and Honors: October 1, 2007

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Craig Levin, PhD, associate professor of radiology and leader of the Molecular Imaging Instrumentation Laboratory (MIIL), has been awarded a new R01, "Enhancing Molecular Cancer Imaging with Cadmium Zinc Telluride PET" from the National Cancer Institute. This projects consists of studying novel imaging sensors comprising a semiconducor material known as cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) and incorporating these sensors into an innovative configuration for an advanced positron emission tomography (PET) system designed for imaging small laboratory animal cancer models. The proposed system built with these CZT imaging sensors promises to enhance substantially the capabilities of PET to detect, visualize, and quantify low concentrations of molecular cancer probes reaching their target on or within cells of diseased tissues. If successful, this work will impact the development of new cancer imaging assays and help to guide the discovery of novel treatments for cancer. In the MIIL, Dr. Levin's research involves the development of novel instrumentation and software algorithms for in vivo imaging of subtle molecular processes associated with disease in the clinic as well as in small laboratory animal research. The goals of the projects are to enhance the photon sensitivity and spatial, spectral, and/or temporal resolutions in order to advance the ability to accurately detect and measure lower concentrations of molecular signal. The ultimate goal is to introduce these new imaging tools into studies of molecular mechanisms and treatments of disease within living subjects.

Awards and Honors: September 14, 2007

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Roland Bammer, PhD, assistant professor (research) of radiology, has earned two honors, both from the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB). He has successfully completed a competitive five-year renewal for his "Improving SENSE MRI for Spiral and Echo-Planar Imaging" R01 grant, which has been funded since 2003. Dr. Bammer has also been awarded an R21 grant for his research project, "Real-Time MRI Motion Correction System." Dr. Bammer's study, "Improving SENSE MRI for Spiral and Echo-Planar Imaging," is designed to demonstrate that spiral and echo-planar imaging (SENSE) can be combined with diffusion-weighted imaging/diffusion-tensor imaging (DWI/DTI) to significantly improve the evaluation of patients with signs or symptoms of cerebral ischemia. His research on real-time MRI motion correction explores the potential to use an alternative MRI motion compensation approach. The success of this project will significantly improve MR exams, particularly for pediatric and geriatric patients, by reducing the overall scan time and improving the diagnostic capacity of the images.

Awards and Honors: September 12, 2007

Suzanne Campanile, CRT, ARRT, R, M, BS, mammography and breast sonography technologist, received the June Stanford Hospital and Clinics Radiology Wingspread Award from the former recipient, Teresa Nelson, CRT. Ms. Campanile was awarded the June Wingspread Award for her outstanding work in mammography and breast sonography. The award is given by one employee to another who has proven that he or she is a "special performer" by demonstrating exemplary performance in areas such as job knowledge; work ethics; communication skills; inter- and intradepartmental relationships; versatility; and judgment. Born in Burlingame, California, Ms. Campanile resides in Belmont with her husband and three children. In 1983, Ms. Campanile graduated with honors, receiving her AS degree from Canada College's Radiology Technology Program where she was awarded the Samuel Elkins Award for academic achievement. Ms. Campanile worked at Kaiser Permanente in Redwood City for four years before beginning her career at Stanford in July of 1987. After working for a brief time in diagnostic radiology, Ms. Campanile became the lead technologist in the gastrointestinal section. She then completed CT training and became the initial X-ray technologist for the Cowell Student Health Center, which is now the Vaden Health Center. After passing her mammography boards in 1994, Ms. Campanile shifted her focus to mammography. She has recently passed the ARRT board exam in breast sonography, and she is currently a mammographer and breast sonographer in the breast imaging section. The Wingspread Award gives employees the opportunity to recognize who among them has gone above and beyond the fulfillment of his or her usual duties. Wingspread awardees can keep the award for as long as they wish or until they discover another "special performer." Monthly awarding of the Wingspread honor is encouraged as part of the SHC departmental staff meetings.

Awards and Honors: August 13, 2007

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Pat Basu, MD, MBA, diagnostic radiology resident, has received two honors: the American Medical Association (AMA) Jordan Fieldman, MD, Resident and Fellow Section Award and election to the Graduate Medical Education Committee. The Jordan Fieldman, MD, Award is named after Dr. Jordan Fieldman, who was an active voice for physicians during his residency and who passed away prematurely in 2004. Each year, the Fieldman Award is bestowed upon one resident physician who has demonstrated efforts in health advocacy and in improving the medical environment for physicians and their patients. The award winner receives funding to attend the two national annual AMA meetings and to give a presentation on the importance of health advocacy and an update on his/her own efforts. Dr. Basu was also one of five residents to be elected by residents and fellows to the Graduate Medical Education Committee for a one-year term. Along with attending physician representatives from each department in the School of Medicine, the Committee reviews and votes on all aspects of residency education such as resident/fellow benefits, hours, and education.

Awards and Honors: August 2, 2007

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Frances Lau, MS, graduate student in electrical engineering and member of the Molecular Imaging Instrumentation Laboratory as well as the VLSI Research Group at Stanford, has received the McCormick Travel Grant Award. These travel awards were established by Katharine McCormick, who bestowed $5 million to Stanford in support of women pursuing careers in academic medicine. Ms. Lau will use her award to attend the 2007 Nuclear Science Symposium and Medical Imaging Conference where she will present her work on designing and developing electronics for a 1 mm resolution breast dedicated PET imaging system. Her research interests also include circuits and devices for biomedical applications.

Awards and Honors: August 2, 2007

OlcottPratx130.jpgPeter Olcott (on left), graduate student in the Bioengineering Department and member of the Molecular Imaging Instrumentation Laboratory, and Guillem Pratx, MS, (on right) graduate student in electrical engineering and a member of the Molecular Imaging Instrumentation Laboratory, have both won Bio-X Travel Awards. Mr. Pratx received his award for his oral presentation entitled, "Acceleration of Fully 3-D List-Mode OSEM for High-Resolution PET Using Graphics Processing Units," which he gave at the 9th International Meeting on Fully Three-Dimensional Image Reconstruction in Radiology and Nuclear Medicine. Mr. Pratx has developed real-time software for an intra-operative gamma camera and is now focusing on practical image reconstruction algorithms for high-resolution, pre-clinical PET systems. Mr. Olcott was granted his award at the 2007 Society of Nuclear Medicine Conference for his presentation, "Evaluation of a New Readout ASIC for a 1 MM Resolution PET System Based upon Position Sensitive Avalanche Photodiodes." His research focus is on delivering clinical imaging instrumentation for the Department of Radiology and the Molecular Imaging Program. Initially, he developed an intra-operative, hand-held gamma ray camera (or nuclear imager) for the surgical staging of cancer. Currently, he is engineering two novel clinical PET systems. The first system is the data acquisition electronics for a dual panel PET mammography camera. The second is a new PET detector for a combined clinical PET/MR scanner.

Awards and Honors: August 2, 2007

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Eun Kyoung Ryu, PhD, postdoctoral scholar in the Molecular Imaging Probe Laboratory, has been awarded a Dean's Fellowship. Since 1941, endowment funds from donors to Stanford medical research have enabled these awards. Dr. Ryu's research interests include the development of novel radiotracers for brain imaging.

Awards and Honors: July 3, 2007

Lau.jpgFrances Lau, MS, graduate student in electrical engineering and member of the Molecular Imaging Instrumentation Laboratory as well as the VLSI Research Group at Stanford, was awarded the Stanford Bio-X Program Graduate Student Fellowship to support her interdisciplinary research on the design and development of a 1 mm resolution breast dedicated PET imaging system. Ms. Lau is also a member of the "Women in Electrical Engineering" (WEE) mentoring program through which she mentors new graduate students regarding class selection, research groups, qualifying examinations, and adjusting to graduate student life.

Awards and Honors: June 28, 2007

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(From left to right: Martin P. Sandler, MD, FACNP, (outgoing SNM President); Sven N. Reske, MD, (awardee); Andrew Quon, MD, (awardee); Tore Bach-Gansmo, MD, PhD, (awardee); and Heinrich R. Schelbert, MD, PhD, (editor-in-chief, The Journal of Nuclear Medicine)

Andrew Quon, MD, assistant professor of radiology and nuclear medicine; Sandy Napel, PhD, professor of radiology and co-director of the 3D Medical Imaging Laboratory; Chris Beaulieu, MD, PhD, professor of radiology; and Sanjiv Sam Gambhir, MD, PhD, professor of radiology and bioengineering; director of the Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford; and chief of the Nuclear Medicine Division, have been awarded the 2007 Society of Nuclear Medicine (SNM) Best Clinical Article for their paper entitled "'Flying Through' and 'Flying Around' a PET/CT Scan: Pilot Study and Development of 3D Integrated 18F-FDG PET/CT for Virtual Bronchoscopy and Colonoscopy" published in the July 2006 Journal of Nuclear Medicine. In their article, they present a new imaging and processing protocol that can visually remove the organs and highlight tumors and cancerous "hot spots" in 3D positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) images.

Awards and Honors: June 26, 2007

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Melissa Enriquez, MD, was awarded the 2007 Norman Blank Award for the outstanding medical student in Radiology. The award was created in memory of longtime faculty member and Director of Admissions Norman Blank, MD. Faculty who worked with Enriquez were impressed by her "extraordinary organizational and communication skills, ambition, drive, and commitment to radiology" and "great leadership potential." Dr. Enriquez "single-handedly resurrected the moribund Radiology Interest Group at Stanford, served as its president, and organized several after hours events to familiarize medical students with the field of radiology." She also arranged for this group to receive funds from the Associated Students of Stanford University (ASSU). Dr. Enriquez will graduate from the 2007 class of the Stanford Medical School on June 16. She matched at Harbor-University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) Medical Center for a transitional year internship, and UCLA for a residency in diagnostic radiology. As award winner, she will receive a popular radiology textbook and a cash prize.

Awards and Honors: June 15, 2007

ZiboLi.jpgZibo Li, PhD, postdoctoral scholar in the Molecular Imaging Probe Laboratory (MIPL), has won a second place Young Professionals Committee Best Basic Science Award at the 2007 Annual Convention of the Society of Nuclear Medicine (SNM). The objective of the Young Professionals Committee Award is to identify promising scientists and to support their research. Dr. Li's research focuses on the development of novel tracers (peptides, proteins, growth factors, antibodies, and antibody fragments-based) for near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence, MRI, SPECT, and PET imaging of small animal tumor xenografts and, potentially, of cancer patients.

Awards and Honors: June 15, 2007

MeiHuang.jpgMei Huang, PhD, postdoctoral scholar in the Cardiovascular Molecular Imaging Laboratory, received an American Heart Association (AHA) Postdoctoral Fellowship Grant for 2007 to 2009. The AHA award funds highly talented scientists as they complete their research training and begin their careers as independent investigators. Dr. Huang currently researches gene therapy based on RNA interference and the genetic regulation of stem cell differentiation.

Awards and Honors: June 11, 2007

delazerda100.jpgAdam de la Zerda, a PhD candidate in the Multimodality Molecular Imaging Laboratory, and Dr. Milana Trounce, Avishai Shoham, and Kristen Gasior from the Stanford Graduate School of Business, have won first prize in the Bay Area Entrepreneurship Contest for their idea, Laser-Seal. The competition was held at a conference sponsored by Women 2.0, which provides a support network for young women entrepreneurs by supplying mentorship and resources. In front of 12 venture capitalists, the Laser-Seal team presented their idea of using laser technology in the operating room to provide more efficient and cleaner wound closures. They were selected as the grand prize winners along with one other team. Included in their award is the chance to meet with Tim Draper of Draper Fisher Jurveston and Michael Moritz of Sequoia Capital. In the MIPS lab, Mr. de la Zerda researches photoacoustic molecular imaging.

Awards and Honors: May 25, 2007

Peilin hsiung.jpgPei-Lin Hsiung, PhD, postdoctoral scholar in the Network for Translational Research in Optical Imaging (NTROI), has received the American Cancer Society-Canary Foundation Postdoctoral Fellowship, which is awarded to the "best and brightest researchers" who specialize in early detection research. Her winning project is entitled "Development of Peptide Reagents for In Vivo Detection of Dysplasia in the Colon," which focuses on topically-applied reagents that can be used for the screening and the early detection of colon cancer. Dr. Hsiung's research combines the development of disease-targeting peptides with optical imaging and in vivo microscopy, with the goal of rapidly translating bench research into the clinical setting.

Awards and Honors: May 22, 2007

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Luke Higgins, PhD, first-year medical student, has been awarded a Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) Foundation Medical Student Research Grant. Through this grant, SIR encourages medical students to engage in cutting-edge research in interventional radiology that will likely translate to improved patient care. Funding criteria includes scientific merit, innovative quality of the research proposal, and relevance to interventional radiology. Dr. Higgins earned his PhD in biological chemistry from MIT and is now working with Lawrence "Rusty" Hofmann, MD, who is investigating the delivery of autologous adipose-derived multipotential stromal cells (ASCs) to treat peripheral arterial disease. Under Dr. Hofmann's mentorship, Dr. Higgins will be analyzing the capacity of human and rabbit MR-labeled ASCs to differentiate and express arteriogenic factors relative to unlabeled cells and will be comparing these expression levels to cells under stressed conditions.

Awards and Honors: May 21, 2007

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Weibo Cai, PhD, postdoctoral scholar in the Molecular Imaging Probe Laboratory, has been awarded the Benedict Cassen Postdoctoral Fellowship from the Society of Nuclear Medicine (SNM), which is granted to recipients who have an excellent record and exceptional research ability. He has also received the 1st place 2007 SNM Young Professionals Committee Best Basic Science Award for his abstract "Quantitative RadioimmunoPET of EphA2 Expression in Xenograft-Bearing Mice," submitted to the 2007 54th Annual Meeting of the SNM in Washington, D.C. His research focuses on the development of novel peptides, proteins, growth factors, antibodies, antibody fragments, and nanoparticle-based tracers for PET, SPECT, optical, and MRI imaging in small animal disease models and, potentially, in cancer patients.

Awards and Honors: March-April 2007

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Scott W. Atlas, MD, professor and chief of neuroradiology and senior fellow at the Hoover Institution, has been accorded a grant from the Presidential Fund for Innovation in International Studies to support his research project, "Health Care for One Billion: Experimenting with Incentives for the Supply of Health Care in Rural China." Along with Scott Rozelle, PhD, Helen F. Farnsworth senior fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies, Dr. Atlas is examining the effects of existing health policies and institutions in rural China. Their project also studies a practice common in China's healthcare system that allows physicians both to prescribe drugs and to receive a large profit from drug sales. Their research experiments with realigning the incentives surrounding this practice. Dr. Atlas has also recently received a Fulbright Scholar Award to collaborate with leaders in China on improving and restructuring the healthcare system in China, a system that has dramatically devolved over the course of the past decade despite significant economic development in other areas. This year, Presidential Fund grants at Stanford were awarded to faculty teams composed of faculty from different disciplines who do not usually work together. Their projects had to involve collaborative research and teaching and to address one of three primary areas: the societal and security implications caused by China's female deficit; incentives to provide healthcare services in rural China; and the impact of higher education's rapid expansion in developing countries. For more information, please see http://news-service.stanford.edu/news/2007/february28/presfund-022807.html.

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Feng Cao, PhD, postdoctoral scholar in the Cardiovascular Molecular Imaging Lab, received the 2006 Best Basic Science Paper Award from the journal, Circulation, for her paper, "In Vivo Visualization of Embryonic Stem Cell Survival, Proliferation, and Migration after Cardiac Delivery." In this article, Dr. Cao and colleagues analyze the fate of murine embryonic stem (ES) cells carrying fluorescence, bioluminescence, and positron emission tomography reporter genes transplanted into the heart.

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Chona Diosomito, radiology clerical supervisor, received the March Stanford Hospital and Clinics Radiology Wingspread Award from the former recipient. Ms. Diosomito has been working in the scheduling division of Stanford Radiology since January 23, 2006, after moving to California from New York. She has worked in the health-care industry since 1990 as a patient financial services cash control supervisor for St. Vincent's Catholic Medical Center, Comprehensive Cancer Center (Aptium Oncology), and Hospital for Special Surgery. Ms. Diosomito's experience as a supervisor has given her an appreciation of how important it is to provide excellent care for each patient. In recognition of her outstanding work, Ms. Diosomito was awarded the Wingspread Award, which is given by one employee to another who has proven that he or she is a "special performer" by demonstrating exemplary performance in areas such as job knowledge; work ethics; communication skills; inter- and intradepartmental relationships; versatility; and judgment. The Wingspread Award gives employees the opportunity to recognize who among them has gone above and beyond the fulfillment of his or her usual duties. Wingspread awardees can keep the award for as long as they wish or until they discover another "special performer." Monthly awarding of the Wingspread honor is encouraged as part of the SHC departmental staff meetings.

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Garry E. Gold, MD, associate professor of radiology, has been awarded a 2007 Cum Laude Award for an outstanding paper by the Society of Computed Body Tomography and Magnetic Resonance (SCBT/MR). The title of the paper is "Isotropic MRI with 3D-FSE-XETA (Extended Echo Train Acquisition)" (Gold GE, Busse RF, Stevens KJ, Han E, Brau AC, Beatty PJ, Beaulieu CF).

SamMazin_100.jpgSam Mazin, MS, graduate student in the Electrical Engineering Department, has been awarded the Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE) Cum Laude Award for his poster, "A Fast 3D Reconstruction Algorithm for Inverse-Geometry CT Based on an Exact PET Rebinning Algorithm." Only one poster within the "Physics of Medical Imaging" conference can receive this award each year. Cum Laude Awards are bestowed upon scientists who attain a standard of excellence judged by the quality and quantity of their results.

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Joseph McGinley, MD, PhD, second-year radiology resident, has been selected as one of six trainees nationwide in radiology and cardiology to participate in the "Siemens Outstanding Academic Research (SOAR) Award Program: Awards for Excellence in Cardiac CT," sponsored by the Society of Cardiac Computed Tomography (SCCT). Dr. McGinley was selected to participate in this program based on his interest in cardiac imaging, current CV, and previous areas of research, which include a PhD in cardiac physiology focused on valvular heart disease from Temple University in Philadelphia. Under this award program, Dr. McGinley has been selected to write and present a review of the CT imaging of valvular heart disease. His manuscript will be published in Applied Radiology, and he will compete with the six other candidates at the 2nd annual meeting of the SCCT in July of 2007 in Washington, D.C. One person will be awarded from each specialty and will receive a six-month funded fellowship in cardiac imaging research as well as funding to return for the annual meeting in 2008.

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Teresa Nelson, CRT, MRI supervisor, received the April Stanford Hospital and Clinics Radiology Wingspread Award from the former recipient. Raised in San Carlos, California, Ms. Nelson is a native of the peninsula. In 1994, she graduated with her AS degree from Canada College's Radiology Technology Program and worked at Seton Medical Center in Daly City and California Pacific Medical Center (CPMC) in San Francisco. Ms. Nelson started her Stanford career in January of 2000, when she began working in diagnostic radiology and mammography. During the fall of 2001, she completed MRI training and has been the MRI supervisor since 2003. As the MRI supervisor, Ms. Nelson has had the opportunity to train other technologists and engage in research. Last year, she spoke at the Fifth Annual Breast MRI Interpretation, Correlation, and Intervention Continuing Medical Education (CME) Conference in Las Vegas with Anne Marie Sawyer, RT (R) (MR), from the Lucas Center. In recognition of her outstanding work in MRI, Ms. Nelson was awarded the April Wingspread Award, which is given by one employee to another who has proven that he or she is a "special performer" by demonstrating exemplary performance in areas such as job knowledge; work ethics; communication skills; inter- and intradepartmental relationships; versatility; and judgment. The Wingspread Award gives employees the opportunity to recognize who among them has gone above and beyond the fulfillment of his or her usual duties. Wingspread awardees can keep the award for as long as they wish or until they discover another "special performer." Monthly awarding of the Wingspread honor is encouraged as part of the SHC departmental staff meetings.

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Sandra Rodriguez, RT (R) (MR), MR research technologist, was awarded a Women's Opportunity Award from the Soroptimist Club. Many Women's Opportunity Award recipients have overcome enormous obstacles in their quest for a better life. The purpose of the awards is to improve the lives of women by giving them the resources that they need to improve their education, skills, and employment prospects. To be eligible for a Women's Opportunity Award, the applicant must provide the primary financial support for her family and must be enrolled in or have been accepted to a vocational/skills training program or an undergraduate degree program. Since its inception in 1972, the Women's Opportunity Awards Program has disbursed $15 million and has assisted more than 20,000 women. Ms. Rodriguez is currently enrolled in the Bachelor of Science in Health Administration (B.S.H.A) online program through the University of Phoenix. She anticipates receiving her degree in the 2008/2009 academic year and continuing her education by attaining a Master of Health Administration (MHA).

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Ricky Tong, PhD, medical student in the Multimodality Molecular Imaging Lab, was awarded a 2007 Society of Nuclear Medicine Student Fellowship for his proposed project, which involves creating a transgenic mouse with the ubiquitous expression of a triple-fusion reporter protein. Any cells and tissues taken from this universal donor mouse can be traced using three of the most commonly available imaging techniques: bioluminescence, fluorescence, and PET. Dr. Tong's transgenic mouse promises to be an extremely valuable tool in many fields such as cancer and transplant biology.

DavidNTran100.jpgDavid N. Tran, medical student at Stanford University, was awarded a "Society of Computed Body Tomography and Magnetic Resonance (SCBT/MR) in Training Award" at the 30th annual 2007 meeting of the Society of Computed Body Tomography and Magnetic Resonance (SCBT/MR). The award is granted to the young investigator who presents the best paper in CT or MR. Mr. Tran's winning paper is entitled, "Promises and Limitations of Dual-Energy CT in Lower Extremity CT Angiography" (Tran DN, Roos J, Straka M, Sandner D, Razavi H, Chang M, Pelc N, Napel S, Fleischmann D). He obtained his undergraduate degree from the University of California, Los Angeles, in electrical engineering and is currently a second-year medical student. Mr. Tran's research interests include improving the diagnostic evaluation and treatment planning for patients with peripheral arterial occlusive disease, and he is considering diagnostic and interventional radiology as a future clinical career.

Wu_100100.jpgJoseph Wu, MD, PhD, assistant professor of medicine (cardiology) and radiology, has received a California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM) SEED grant for his work on the in vivo imaging of hESC derivatives and tumorigenicity. Through his research, Dr. Wu is investigating human embryonic stem cell survival, proliferation, and differentiation in vivo to improve the safety of hESC delivery. Selected from among 231 applications, Dr. Wu is one of twelve Stanford principal investigators to be funded in this initial round by the CIRM, which has approved 72 grants totaling approximately $45 million over the next two years.


Awards and Honors: February 2007

PatBasu100100.jpgPat Basu, MD, MBA, diagnostic radiology resident, has received the Excellence in Medicine Award presented by the American Medical Association (AMA), in association with the Pfizer Humanities Initiative. Excellence in Medicine Awards are awarded to physician, resident, fellow, and medical student leaders who demonstrate outstanding leadership in organized medicine, community affairs, and health policy with a particular promise for advancing health care in the United States. On February 12, 2007, Dr. Basu attended the AMA Foundation Excellence in Medicine Awards Ceremony and Dinner in Washington, D.C. He was the sole award recipient from Stanford and the only radiology resident among the 11 resident/fellow awardees. While in Washington, Dr. Basu attended leadership workshops and networked with legislators to share opinions on health care. He also met Bill Clinton's former communications director, George Stephanopoulos, who was the master of ceremonies at the AMA dinner on February 12. Currently, Dr. Basu is completing his rotation in emergency room radiology at the Santa Clara Valley Medical Center.


Sandip.jpgSandip Biswal, MD, assistant professor of radiology, has been awarded the 2006 Resident Teaching Award: Junior Faculty of the Year for the second year in a row!

Gambhir.jpgSanjiv Sam Gambhir, MD, PhD, professor of radiology and bioengineering; director of the Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford; and chief of the Nuclear Medicine Division, will co-host the Nobel Symposium, "Watching Life through Molecular Imaging," along with Dr. Ringertz from May 6 to 9, 2007 at the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, Sweden. The symposium will focus on the recent advances in the rapidly expanding field of molecular imaging. Featured topics include "Advances in Molecular Imaging Instrumentation"; "Novel Chemistry and Fundamental Assays for Interrogating Molecular Events"; "Imaging of Immune, Cancer, and Stem Cell Trafficking"; "Novel Approaches to Imaging Cancer in Humans"; "Molecular Imaging of Cardiovascular Disease and Drug Efficacy"; and "Imaging the Normal Brain and Neurological Diseases."

Gold01B.jpgGarry E. Gold, MD, associate professor of radiology, is a five-time winner of the Lauterbur Award for the best MRI paper from the Society for Computed Body Tomography and Magnetic Resonance. The Lauterbur Award in MR is named in honor of Paul Lauterbur, PhD, who first described the basic MRI technique in 1972 and published his first MR image in 1973 (zeugmatography). Dr. Gold received his fifth Lauterbur Award in April of 2006 at the annual meeting of the Society of Computed Body Tomography and Magnetic Resonance. His paper was titled, "Patellofemoral Pain: Analysis with Upright Real-Time MRI and 3D Finite Element Modeling."

HYoungLee.jpgHa-Young Lee, PhD, postdoctoral scholar in the Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, has received the Korean Research Foundation (KRF) Scholarship. Dr. Lee's current research focuses on developing targeted iron oxide nanoparticles for molecular imaging and drug delivery.

Lutz.jpgAmelie Lutz, MD, postdoctoral scholar in the Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, has received an extension of her postdoctoral fellowship in the Multimodality Molecular Imaging Lab by the Swiss National Science Foundation (SNF) in Berne. Dr. Lutz's research focuses on molecular imaging in oncology, which includes the imaging of colon cancer and the early detection of ovarian cancer.

Midkiff100100.jpgMichele Midkiff, CPC, RCC, senior radiology coder, was elected president of the American Academy of Coders (AAPC), Golden Gate Chapter. In part, the mission of the AAPC is to provide professional, ethical, and educational standards within the medical field of coding. The organization also provides certification, ongoing education, and recognition for its 60,000 worldwide members, of who over 40,000 are certified. These certifications focus on a variety of disciplines such as the physician office, Certified Professional Coder (CPC); the hospital outpatient facility, Certified Professional Coder-Hospital (CPC-H); and the payer perspective coding, Certified Professional Coder-Payer (CPC-P). The AAPC also provides continuing education through local chapters, workshops, a monthly newsmagazine (Coding Edge), publications, and conferences. The local Golden Gate Chapter of the AAPC provides networking opportunities for members and administers the CPC exam quarterly to become a Certified Professional Coder (CPC). The five-hour test covers procedural and diagnosis coding as well as medical terminology. For more information on the AAPC and the extensive possibilities in the coding profession, please contact Michele Midkiff at mmidkiff@stanfordmed.org.

Norbert-Pelc_25.jpgNorbert Pelc, ScD, professor of radiology and bioengineering and, by courtesy, electrical engineering, has been elected to the College of Fellows of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering (AIMBE) for his contributions to our field as a scientist, engineer, educator, and mentor for over three decades. Membership is awarded to "leaders in the field [who] have distinguished themselves through their contributions in research, industrial practice and/or education." Dr. Pelc will receive the award at the Institute's annual meeting in March 2007.

Ringertz2004A.jpgHans Ringertz, MD, PhD, visiting professor of radiology, was named president-elect of the International Society of Radiology (ISR) at the 2006 International Congress of Radiology (ICR) in Cape Town, South Africa. In 2008, he will assume office as president of the ISR at the International Congress of Radiology (ICR) in Marrakesh, Morocco. The ISR is composed of over 200,000 radiologists representing the national societies of radiology from 89 countries. The International Society of Radiology arranges the biannual International Congress of Radiology as well as hosts the World Leadership Radiology Forum along with organizations such as the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA); the American College of Radiology (ACR); and the European Congress of Radiology (ECR). Together with Dr. Gambhir, Dr. Ringertz will be co-hosting the Nobel Symposium, "Watching Life through Molecular Imaging," from May 6 to 9, 2007 at the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, Sweden, where he is currently professor emeritus of radiology.

wingspreadaward_2.jpgMatea Shimeg, radiology scheduler, received the February Stanford Hospital and Clinics Radiology Wingspread Award from the former recipient. This award is given by one employee to another who has proven that he or she is a "special performer" by demonstrating exemplary performance in areas such as job knowledge; work ethics; communication skills; inter- and intradepartmental relationships; versatility; and judgment. The Wingspread Award gives employees the opportunity to recognize who among them has gone above and beyond the fulfillment of his or her usual duties. Wingspread awardees can keep the award for as long as they wish or until they discover another "special performer." Monthly awarding of the Wingspread honor is encouraged as part of the SHC departmental staff meetings.

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Juergen Willmann, MD, research fellow in the Molecular Imaging Program, has received the 2006 Editor's Recognition Award from Elsevier in recognition of his outstanding service as a reviewer of scientific manuscripts submitted for publication in the European Journal of Radiology and European Journal of Radiology Extra.


(Images courtesy of Mark Riesenberger)

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