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Radiology Technologists of the Year

Paulo Castaneda with Andrew Quon, MD and Andrei Iagaru, MD, Co-Chairs of the Nuclear Medicine & Molecular Imaging section

Paulo Castaneda, a Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging technologist displays his Radiology Technologist of the Year award with Section Co-Chiefs Andrew Quon, MD and Andrei Iagaru, MD.

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Julie Loero, a PA VAHCS technologist, displays her Radiology Technologist of the Year award with Section Chief, George Segall, MD.

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Gerald Encinias, anLPCH technologist, displays his Radiology Technologist of the Year award with Section Chief, Richard Barth, MD.

Congratulations to all!

Daniel Rubin Receives "Most Awesome Advisor Award"

We are very quick to critique things when they are bad, but not very good at pointing out when things are good. In the academic domain, when a mentor does a good job (meaning that he or she is resourceful, provides meaningful feedback, direction when needed, and advisees do not imagine fire emanating from the office before meetings) it often goes unspoken. The single graduate student can also lose perspective that his or her advisor is providing this duty to a huge number of students while maintaining his or her own publications, grants, and research.

This perspective was brought to the surface in the Rubin Lab, and it was apparent that many people appreciated everything that makes Daniel a really awesome advisor, but no one really talked about it. To show our appreciation, we have spontaneously presented Daniel with the "Most Awesome Advisor Award," which includes a semantically annotated version of himself with Radlex terms, each annotation encompassing a feature that makes him an awesome advisor. The plaque is signed at the bottom by his advisees, upside down like an x-ray, and we hope that he might hang it in his office as a reminder that we appreciate his hard work.

Awards and Honors: Susan Kopiwoda, MS, MPH

Susan Kopiwoda was awarded the 2011 Department of Radiology Employee of the Year. Susan was selected for this award by the Division Chiefs and Vice Chairs. Susan has done a terrific job with respect to helping faculty and others with all grant submissions and in looking for new grant opportunities. This is a 24/7 job with multiple stressful demands. Susan always gives a 110% effort and is a terrific role model for many with her
positive can-do attitude.

Congrats Susan!

Awards and Honors II: June 28, 2011

KamayaAya_100.gifAya Kamaya, MD, assistant professor of radiology (diagnostic), was awarded the 2011 Wylie J Dodds Research Award from the Society of Gastrointestinal Radiologists for her outstanding research on "Prognostic Value of Early Changes in Liver Metastases Treated with Bevacizumab Determined Study" (coinvestigators: Grace Tye, MD, and Dominik Fleischmann, MD).

Dr. Kamaya completed a fellowship in abdominal imaging at Stanford in 2005, and has been a faculty member in the abdominal imaging section at Stanford since then. During this time, she was given two teaching awards for her outstanding contributions to resident education, compassionate patient care, and research. She is currently the associate fellowship director of the Stanford Abdominal Imaging Fellowship.

Dr. Kamaya completed her residency in diagnostic radiology at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, where she was awarded the Executive Council Award from the American Roentgen Ray Society for her work on "Color Doppler Twinkling Artifact" and the Laurence A. Mack Research Award from the Society of Radiologists in Ultrasound for her work on "Linear Streak Artifact." She completed medical school at the University of Utah in her hometown of Salt Lake City.

As an undergraduate, she double majored in engineering sciences and Asian Studies, securing her two bachelor's degrees at Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire. Her research interests include investigating new ultrasound technologies such as photoacoustic ultrasound, in conjunction with the Electrical Engineering Department at Stanford; liver imaging; and women's imaging. Outside of work, her favorite activities include skiing and snowboarding (her favorite ski resort is Snowbird, UT), as well as running, surfing, and traveling.

Please view her prior blog postings: "Awards and Honors: July 28, 2010"; "Awards and Honors: July 20, 2010"; and "New Faculty Hires and Promotions: January 23, 2008."

Drs. Do and Rubin Develop New RAD Teaching Files (RADTF) Tool

By Bao Do, MD

Radiology teaching files (TF) are an important component of radiology training. However, identifying cases, preparing images, and authoring a collection can be time consuming. Building on the RadBank data warehouse work by Daniel Rubin, MD, and Terry Desser MD, RADTF simplifies the process of teaching file creation by using natural language processing methods developed by Bao Do, MD, Daniel Rubin, MD, and Andrew Wu, MD, to extract data from full radiology reports and to automatically generate a stand-alone, on-demand "teaching file."

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Using RADTF, the Stanford Department of Radiology has created a teaching file collection of over 2.5 million "cases," which were generated in less than 1 day. Since 2009, RADTF has logged more than 10,000 queries, and more recently, over a 4-month period, RADTF served over 3,200 pages. Using RADTF, radiologists can perform searches of less common disease entities in real-time during readout and enable retrieval of similar examples--in full PACS quality--for teaching or decision support.

RADTF served over 3,200 pages. Using RADTF, radiologists can perform searches of less common disease entities in real-time, during readout, and enable the retrieval of similar examples--in full PACS quality--for teaching or decision support. For example, a search for a “cyclops lesion,” which is a fibrotic complication of ACL grafts, yields over 200 potential cases compared to 10 cases using a commercial web-based radiology teaching file with almost 50,000 members. RADTF can also filter out "irrelevant" concepts such as negations (i.e., "no evidence of appendicitis"). These methods can improve precision up to 400% compared to Google Desktop (from Wu et al, "Evaluation of Negation and Uncertainty Detection and its Impact on Precision and Recall" (J Digit Imaging 2011;24(2):234–242).

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Awards and Honors I: June 28, 2011

KamayaAya_100.gifAya Kamaya, MD, assistant professor of radiology (diagnostic), was honored with the 2011 Society of Uroradiology Research Award for excellence in research exemplified by her project, "Photoacoustic Imaging of Bladder Cancer" (coinvestigators: Pierre Khuri-Yakub, PhD, and Omer Oralkan. PhD,).

Since the completion of her fellowship in body imaging at Stanford in 2005, Dr. Kamaya has been a clinical instructor, clinical assistant professor, and assistant professor in the abdominal imaging section at Stanford. During this time, she was given two teaching awards for her outstanding contributions to resident education, compassionate patient care, and research. She is currently the associate fellowship director of the Stanford Body Imaging Fellowship.

Prior to coming to Stanford for her fellowship, she completed her residency in diagnostic radiology at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, where she was awarded the Executive Council Award from the American Roentgen Ray Society for her work on "Color Doppler Twinkling Artifact" and the Laurence A. Mack Research Award from the Society of Radiologists in Ultrasound for her work on "Linear Streak Artifact." She completed medical school at the University of Utah in her hometown of Salt Lake City. As an undergraduate, she double majored in engineering sciences and Asian Studies, securing her two bachelor's degrees at Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire. Her research interests include investigating new ultrasound technologies such as photoacoustic ultrasound, in conjunction with the Electrical Engineering Department at Stanford; liver imaging; and women's imaging. Outside of work, her favorite activities include skiing and snowboarding (her favorite ski resort is Snowbird, UT), as well as running, surfing, and traveling.

Please view her prior blog postings: "Awards and Honors: June 24, 2011"; "Awards and Honors: July 28, 2010"; "Awards and Honors: July 20, 2010"; and "New Faculty Hires and Promotions: January 23, 2008."

In the News: Garry Gold, MD

Gold01B.jpgAccording to a June 21, 2011, Stanford Report article, Dr. Garry Gold has been awarded the "Allan V. Cox Medal Faculty Excellence Fostering Undergraduate Research" for being "'Dr. Gold with the heart of gold.'" He was awarded the Cox Medal for his outstanding work directing undergraduate research. Dr. Gold was particularly praised for "sharing his passion for teaching and research and vast knowledge of radiology and medicine" and "empowering students to be creative and independent in pursuing their research goals" by "selflessly guiding and encouraging students as they prepare for a career in medicine."

To read more about his award, please access "Radiology Professor Garry Gold wins 2011 Cox Medal and "Awards and Honors: June 20, 2011."

Announcements: ISIS June Seminar Series

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For more information, please contact Danae Barnes, administrative program manager.

Celebrating 10 Years of Service at Stanford: Linda Horst RT (MR)

Horst_Linda_200.jpgLinda Horst, RT (MR), senior technologist for the 3D and Quantitative Imaging Laboratory (3DQ), has received a 10-Year Stanford Service Award.

Looking for career growth opportunities, Linda first became interested in working at Stanford through her colleague, Marc Sofilos, RT, who told her that the Lab was looking for an additional technologist to help with the increasing case load. After working as an MRI technologist at Mills-Peninsula Hospital in San Mateo for 10 years, she decided to apply at Stanford: "I was looking for the challenge of learning something new in a field where the technology was going to be constantly changing and where there would be lots of growth." She interviewed and received an offer, so Linda decided to make the change.

During her career at Stanford, Linda has experienced lots of other changes, including moving to Foster City from San Francisco; getting married; and starting a kitchen remodeling project. "We are currently remodeling our kitchen, doing all of the work ourselves," Linda explained. "This has kept us really busy. Besides that, both my husband and myself are very active and enjoy exercising and almost any type of outdoor activity. We both really enjoy running on the trail outside our home in Foster City that goes along the San Francisco Bay. We also enjoy traveling and spend quite a bit of time visiting family in Santa Barbara, but we also love to travel and visit new spots as often as possible."

New Faculty Hires and Promotions: Beverley Newman, MD

Newman_100100.jpgBeverley Newman, MD, has recently been promoted to professor of radiology. She has been the associate chief of pediatric radiology at Lucile Packard Children's Hospital and associate professor of radiology at Stanford since 2006.

Dr. Newman earned her undergraduate and medical school degrees at the University of Witwatersrand in Johannesburg, South Africa, graduating cum laude in 1976. Before immigrating to the United States in 1978, she completed internships in internal medicine and general surgery and was a resident in nephrology and immunology. When she arrived in the U.S., Dr. Newman worked as a resident in pediatrics, which was followed by a radiology residency at Boston City Hospital and Boston University Medical Center.

After finishing her fellowship in pediatric radiology at Boston Children's Hospital, Dr. Newman was a junior staff member in the Department of Radiology at Boston Children's Hospital for a year before being recruited to the faculty of the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and Pittsburgh Children's Hospital. She remained there for 22 years, rising to the rank of professor of radiology and section chief of body imaging and neonatal radiology.

She has received multiple awards and honors over the years, including the Protea Surgical and Dental Prize and the Cottrill Memorial Prize in medical school; the Radiology editor's reviewer recognition award with distinction; and the Fellowship of the American College of Radiology. Dr. Newman has also been an active reviewer for multiple radiology journals including Radiology, the American Journal of Radiology, Pediatric Radiology, and the Journal of Pediatrics. Her areas of research focus are chest and cardiac imaging in children and newborns. She is also particularly interested in radiation dose reduction in children. Dr. Newman has actively participated in the educational aspects of the Image Gently Initiative and has codirected the 2011 SPR sponsored CT-ALARA ("As Low As Reasonably Achievable") conference.

Please access her prior blog posting at "New Faculty Hires and Promotions: January 2006-February 2007."

Celebrating 20 Years of Service to Stanford: Regina Clarke-Katzenberg, MS

ClarkeKatzenberg.jpgRegina Clarke-Katzenberg, MS, has worked at Stanford for 20 years! She has been the life science research assistant (LSRA) to Dr. Rusty Hofmann in the Cardiovascular Interventional Radiology (CVIR) Section since May of 2007.

Regina arrived at Stanford in 1989. Before joining the Department of Radiology, her research contributed to basic research in the Department of Molecular Pharmacology, the Surgery Department/Transplant Division, and the Department of Cardiovascular Medicine. Regina was also lab manager for the Lucas/MSLS branch of the Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford (MIPS) from 2007-2010, a position now shared between 6 LSRAs. Prior to Stanford, Regina worked as a student at the College of Veterinary Medicine at Cornell University (Weill Cornell Medical College) and as research associate at Yale University Hospital.

Her current focus in the Department of Radiology applies multi-modal imaging in rodents to developing clinically feasible therapies for persistent human diseases. Regina will complete a Clinical Research Conduct and Management course through UC Berkeley Extension in 2012. She has co-authored 15 publications, 5 of which involve research she completed while working in the Department of Radiology.

Regina was born and raised in the suburbs of New York City with dual citizenship in the United States and Ireland. She received her BS in biochemistry from Cornell University in 1985 and her MS in molecular biology at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in 1987. Regina's family hobbies highlight family travel, skiing, water polo, swimming, boating, and surfing. Please view her prior blog article: “New Staff Hires and Promotions: December 17, 2007.”

New Faculty Hires and Promotions: Dr. Shreyas Vasanawala

Vasanawala_100.gifDr. Shreyas Vasanawala has been promoted to associate professor. He joined the Department of Radiology faculty in July of 2007, after receiving his MD and a PhD in biophysics from Stanford University, followed by residency training in radiology at Stanford University Medical Center and a pediatric radiology fellowship at Lucile Packard Children's Hospital (LPCH). During his fellowship, Dr. Vasanawala received specialty training in pediatric musculoskeletal imaging at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center and in pediatric cardiovascular imaging at Sick Kids in Toronto. At Stanford, Dr. Vasanawala's research aims to improve magnetic resonance imaging techniques for pediatric and abdominal imaging.

Please view his prior awards at "Awards and Honors: June 11, 2010"; "In the News: Shreyas Vasanawala, MD"; "Awards and Honors II: February 19, 2010"; "Dr. Vasanawala and Colleagues Receive the Prestigious Caffey Award"; Awards and Honors: April 22, 2009; "Awards and Honors: March 23, 2009"; "Awards and Honors II: February 13, 2009"; "Awards and Honors I: July 11, 2008"; and "New Faculty Hires and Promotions: July 3, 2007."

Awards and Honors: June 20, 2011

Gold01B.jpgGarry E. Gold, MD, associate professor of radiology and (by courtesy) bioengineering and orthopedics at Stanford University, has been awarded the Allan V. Cox Medal Faculty Excellence Fostering Undergraduate Research. Named after the former dean of the School of Earth Sciences, the Cox Medal is presented annually to faculty who have "established a record of excellence in directing undergraduate research"
(http://humsci.stanford.edu/faculty/awards/cox_medal).

Dr. Gold received his master's degree in electrical engineering from Stanford in 1988 and his MD from Stanford in 1992. He has authored over 120 journal articles, 250 abstracts, and 6 patents in MRI. He has been the principal investigator or a co-investigator on over 30 funded research projects, and he is the principal investigator on 2 NIH-funded projects to improve MR imaging of osteoarthritis and the use of real-time MRI for the study of biomechanics. He has also been awarded a President’s Medal from the International Skeletal Society as well as the Lauterbur Award for the Best MRI Paper 6 times from the Society for Computed Body Tomography and Magnetic Resonance (SCBT/MR). Dr. Gold reviews manuscripts for 10 peer-reviewed journals, including the Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (JMRI) and the Journal of Magnetic Resonance in Medicine (MRM) , and he is on the editorial board of several publications.

At Stanford, he practices clinical musculoskeletal radiology and teaches medical students, residents, and fellows; in one of his courses, imaging physics and human anatomy, he also teaches undergraduates and graduate students. In recognition of his teaching, he was awarded the 2005 Kaiser Award for outstanding and innovative contributions to education. He also serves as an advisor and co-advisor for many engineering graduate students and postdoctoral fellows. To view his prior blog postings, please access “Awards and Honors: May 27, 2011”; "Awards and Honors: February 22, 2010"; "Awards and Honors: March 25, 2009"; "Drs. Gold and Hargreaves' Osteoarthritis Research Featured on ABC7 News"; "Drs. Gold and Hargreaves Detect Osteoarthritis Using Sodium MRI"; "People and Their Pets: Humboldt"; "Awards and Honors: April 18, 2008"; "Awards and Honors: April 17, 2008"; "Awards and Honors: October 23, 2007"; "Awards and Honors: February 2007"; and "New Faculty Hires and Promotions: January 2006-February 2007"


New Faculty Hires and Promotions: Brian Hargreaves, PhD

hargreaves_100.gifBrian Hargreaves, PhD, has been promoted to associate professor of radiology. He joined the Department in 2005 after completing graduate and post-graduate work in Electrical Engineering at Stanford. His research focuses on the application of new MRI methods to clinical body MRI (including abdominal, vascular, breast, and musculoskeletal imaging) and the development of novel excitation schemes, efficient imaging methods, and reconstruction tools that provide improved diagnostic contrast compared with current methods. His group supports many clinical methods at Stanford Hospital including breast MRI, MRI of subjects with metallic implants, and MR angiography methods.

Dr. Hargreaves is married with a 10-month-old daughter, and enjoys skiing, hiking, and cycling.

To view his prior blog postings, please access "Awards and Honors: February 22, 2010"; "Drs. Gold and Hargreaves' Osteoarthritis Research Featured on ABC7 News"; "Drs. Gold and Hargreaves Detect Osteoarthritis Using Sodium MRI"; and "Awards and Honors: April 17, 2008."

Out with the Old, In with the New: Lucas Center Renovations

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(All photos courtesy of Mark Riesenberger.)

Under the guidance of Gary Glover, PhD, director of the Radiological Sciences Laboratory (RSL), we are renovating our 1.5T Suite in the Richard M. Lucas Center for Imaging by removing our 1.5T scanner. Our renovated Suite will be renamed the "3T3 Suite" and will house a new GE Discovery 750 3.0T scanner, called the Discovery 750, and a High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) Lab, directed by Kim Butts Pauly, PhD.

According to Dr. Glover, the construction people completing the demolition of the 1.5T Suite have the motto "Been there. Wrecked that."

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After we have finished the renovation of the 1.5T Suite in November, we will . . .

begin renovating the 3T1 Suite. The 3T1 scanner will be replaced by a new 3T 750w scanner. The Suite will also include a PET insert; hot cell; and DNP 13C hyperpolarizer.

To read a prior blog article on the 1.5T Suite renovation, please access "Retiree 'Outstanding in the Field.'"

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New Faculty Hires and Promotions: Bruce Daniel, MD

Daniel_Bruce.jpgDr. Bruce Daniel, was recently promoted to professor of radiology. A graduate of Harvard Medical School, Dr. Daniel was chief resident in radiology at the University of Michigan before coming to Stanford in 1995. After 2 years as a National Cancer Institute (NCI) fellow at Stanford, he joined the faculty in the body imaging section. In addition to his role as a body imager, Dr. Daniel was involved in nearly all the clinical MRI-guided interventions using the Stanford MRT scanner, including many biopsies, vascular procedures, and ablations. He also built the Breast MRI Program, which is now a vital service for many breast cancer patients. His research interests include new diagnostic MRI methods for detecting and staging breast cancer and MR-guided interventions in the breast and prostate.

Celebrating 20 Years of Service at Stanford: Donna Cronister

Donna Cronister, administrative services manager of the Radiological Sciences Laboratory (RSL) and administrative director for the Richard M. Lucas Center for Imaging, is celebrating her 20-year anniversary at Stanford Radiology!

Working with 9 faculty and over 100 scientific staff, postdoctoral fellows, and students, Donna has managed each facet of the Lab's research since 1990, which includes coordinating funding for researchers; organizing courses and conferences; as well as planning the budget. She is also involved in the day-to-day operations at the Lucas Center and oversees the payroll; reimbursement; accounting; personnel policies and procedures; building maintenance; supply ordering; and service policies. She supervises 5 administrative assistants and serves as the resource for new students, postdoctoral scholars, and visitors. Donna has seen the Lab grow from 2 faculty members, Gary Glover, PhD, and Norbert Pelc, ScD, to over 90 faculty members. Prior to coming to Stanford, Donna worked in the corporate world, first at a chemical company and then at Xerox.

In addition, Donna has been an invited speaker and panelist at the national and regional meetings of the National Council of University Research Administrators (NCURA), where she has discussed service center administration. She has also worked behind the scenes developing the programs for the Society of Research Administrators (SRA) and assisting with SRA meetings. Her awards include the 2007 Marshall D. O'Neill Award for her exceptional and enduring support of Stanford University's research enterprise.

When she's not at work, Donna loves to garden and to spoil her grandchildren: "Life couldn't be better for me. I am now up to 3 granddaughters and 1 grandson."

To read a prior blog article about Donna, please see "Donna Cronister Wins the 2007 Marshall D. O'Neill Award!"


New Faculty Hires and Promotions: Heike Daldrup-Link, MD

daldrupLinkHeike_6.13.jpgHeike Daldrup-Link, MD, has been appointed as associate professor of radiology. Dr. Daldrup-Link is a pediatric radiologist with a clinical emphasis on oncologic imaging and the head of the Daldrup-Link Lab, with focus on “cellular MR imaging techniques for improved cancer characterization and monitoring of stem cell therapies."

She is currently a member of the Stanford Cancer Institute, the Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford (MIPS), and the Center for Biomedical Imaging at Stanford (CBIS). Prior to coming to Stanford, Dr. Daldrup-Link was an associate professor of radiology and pediatrics at the University of California, San Francisco, (UCSF).

Dr. Daldrup-Link earned her medical degree from the University of Munster, Germany, in 1992 and completed a radiology residency and a 2-year fellowship in pediatric radiology at the Technical University of Munich, Germany. From 2003 to 2010, she worked at UCSF as a pediatric radiologist and researcher. Dr. Daldrup-Link has published more than 85 scientific articles and is a member of the board of directors of the Society for Pediatric Radiology (SPR); the Children’s Oncology Group (COG); the editorial board of Pediatric Radiology; the NIH Cancer Immunology and Immunotherapy Study Section; as well as the program committees for the Association of University Radiologists (AUR) and Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) annual meetings. She published a textbook entitled Essentials of Pediatric Radiology: A Multimodality Approach, which was most recently supplemented with a free app for the iPAD: http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/essentials-pediatric-radiology/id440976594?mt=8. Happy case solving!

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2011 Image of the Year

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Andrew Quon, MD, assistant professor of radiology and chief of clinical PET/CT for the Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford (MIPS), and lead author of the study, "F18 NaF PET/CT of Cervical Spine Fixation Hardware," has received the Society of Nuclear Medicine's (SNM) 2011 Image of the Year Award. His image was selected from more than 1,800 studies presented at the 58th Annual Meeting in San Antonio, Texas.

Dr. Quon's 2011 Image of the Year illustrates the ability of positron emission tomography/computer tomography (PET/CT) scans to "identify abnormal bone reaction in patients who have received spinal fixation hardware implants" (from the June 6, 2011 SNM press release: "SNM 2011 Image of the Year: F-18-NaF PET/CT Evaluation of Cervical Spine Fixation Hardware").

To read more, please access the following articles: "SNM's Image of the Year Highlights Non-Oncology Utility" and "SNM's Image of the Year: PET/CT of Cervical Spine Hardware."

Quon_100.gif Andrew Quon, MD, is currently the chief of the PET/CT Clinical Service. Prior to coming to Stanford, Dr. Quon was a clinical staff physician at the University of California, Los Angeles, Medical Center (UCLA). He earned his BA in biology from the University of California, Berkeley, (UCB), before entering medical school at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center. After receiving his MD, Dr. Quon went on to complete his residency in nuclear medicine at the University of California, Los Angeles, Medical Center (UCLA). His research projects include investigations into the use of translational imaging agents, such as 18F-5FU, 18F-FLT, and 18F-NaF. He has published over 40 peer-reviewed articles on his research. In addition to the Walter Wolf Award, Dr. Quon's many honors include a 2007 Journal of Nuclear Medicine Scientific Paper of the Year Award as well as a 2006 AuntMinnie Scientific Paper of the Year.

Awards and Honors: June 10, 2011

Gambhir100120.jpgSanjiv Sam Gambhir, MD, PhD, Virginia & D.K. Ludwig Professor of radiology & bioengineering; director of the molecular imaging program at Stanford (MIPS); director of the Canary Center for Cancer Early Detection at Stanford; chief of the Nuclear Medicine Division; and member of the Bio-X Program, has received the 2011 Georg Charles de Hevesy Nuclear Pioneer Award from the Society of Nuclear Medicine (SNM). The Award bears the name of Georg Charles de Hevesy, who is considered the father of nuclear medicine.

According to SNM President Dominique Delbeke, MD, PhD, “Dr. Gambhir has made extraordinary contributions to the field of molecular imaging," and "he is leading the way to shape the future of nuclear medicine and molecular imaging" (from the June 5, 2011 SNM press release "Sanjiv Sam Gambhir, MD, PhD, Receives SNM’s 2011 Georg Charles de Hevesy Nuclear Pioneer Award").

A world-renowned leader in the field, Dr. Gambhir is transforming the imaging sciences and patient treatment through his expertise and leadership in cellular and molecular imaging. Dr. Gambhir has over 22 years of experience in molecular imaging in both animal models and patients. At Stanford, he also leads several large NCI-funded programs, such as the In Vivo Cellular Molecular Imaging Center (ICMIC); the Center for Nanotechnology Excellence Focused on Therapy Response (CCNE-TR); and the Stanford Molecular Imaging Scholars (SMIS) Program.

Dr. Gambhir's other awards include the 2009 Outstanding Researcher Award from the Radiological Society of Northern America; the Distinguished Clinical Scientist Award from the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation; the Holst Medal; the Tesla Medal; and the Hounsfield Medal from Imperial College, London. In 2008, he became one of the youngest elected members to the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies.

To view some of his prior blog entries, please access "In the News: Dr. Avnesh Thakor, MD, PhD, and Colleagues in the Laboratory of Sanjiv Sam Gambhir, MD, PhD"; "Stanford Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging Clinic Opens"; "Two New Books by Dr. Gambhir--Molecular Imaging with Reporter Genes and Molecular Imaging: Principles and Practice"; "ABC 7 Spotlights Canary Center for Cancer Early Detection at Stanford"; "Awards and Honors I: July 7, 2010"; and "Let the Good Times Roll . . . RSNA Awards Continue." His award is also featured in Inside Stanford Medicine: http://med.stanford.edu/ism/people/index.html#hargreaves0611.


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Awards and Honors: June 6, 2011

NormanBlankAward_Jessica.jpgJessica Sin, fourth-year graduating medical student and 2012-2016 radiology resident, has received the 2011 Norman Blank Award, which was created in memory of longtime faculty member and Director of Admissions Norman Blank, MD. Jessica received this award in recognition of her outstanding performance in radiology research.

Her mentor, Dr. Garry Gold, described her as “an outstanding student who did a tremendous job on a very difficult multidisciplinary research project with me.” Jessica has been working with Dr. Gold comparing F18 PET findings with MRI in patients with hip pain caused by femoroacetabular impingement by running the PET scanner and MRI systems and scanning multiple volunteers and patients. In addition to publishing multiple papers on her PhD research in chemistry, she is preparing a manuscript with Dr. Gold on their F18 PET project. “She is one of the brightest students I have worked with,” said Dr. Gold, “and I’m very excited she is coming to Stanford.”

Jessica received her AB in chemistry and French from Dartmouth College. She went on to complete her PhD in chemistry at Princeton University and a PhD in philosophy from Massachusetts Technical Institute (MIT) before starting medical school at Stanford. After graduation, Jessica will be pursuing an intern year in medicine at Greenwich Hospital in Greenwich, Connecticut. When she returns to Stanford for her residency in July of 2012, Jessica will be training in radiology, similar to her mother, who is a radiologist in Canada where Jessica was born and raised. Jessica’s father is also a practicing physician in Canada where he specializes in pathology.

Please view blog postings regarding prior award winners: Rebecca Rakow-Penner, MD/PhD, Awards and Honors II: June 29, 2010; Yingbing Wang, MD, Awards and Honors II: July 17, 2008 ; and Melissa Enriquez, MD, Awards and Honors: June 26, 2007.

New Faculty Hires and Promotions: Jianghong Rao, PhD

Rao.jpgJianghong Rao, PhD, has been promoted to associate professor of radiology. Dr. Rao is head of the Rao Lab whose main focus is to "design, synthesize, and evaluate novel molecular probes for imaging or manipulating targeted biomolecules in normal and diseased states.”

Dr. Rao first came to Stanford in 2004 as an assistant professor of radiology. He is currently a member of the following programs: the Biophysics Program at Stanford, the Bio-X Program, the Cancer Biology Research Program, and the Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford (MIPS). Most recently, he became an assistant professor (by courtesy) in the Stanford Department of Chemistry. Prior to coming to Stanford, Dr. Rao was an assistant professor in the Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology at the University of California, Los Angeles.

Completing his BS in chemistry at Peking University in China, Dr. Rao earned his MS in chemistry from Rutgers University in New Jersey, and went on to receive his PhD in organic chemistry from Harvard University. After graduate school, he completed a postdoctoral fellowship at the University of California, San Diego, in chemical biology. Dr. Rao has published over 40 articles, and his recent awards include the Human Frontier Science Program Young Investigator Award, Burroughs Wellcome Career Award at the Scientific Interfaces, and the UCLA Frontiers of Sciences Faculty Development Award.

Center for Cancer Systems Biology (CCSB) First Annual Symposium Explores Multi-Disciplinary Approaches to Cancer Breakthroughs

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(all article photos courtesy of Amy Morris)

By Julie Ruiz-Wibbelsmann, PhD

Can we determine what a cell has been thinking, doing, or what it may become to aid cancer research?

How can we use the massive amount of molecular data regarding tumorigenesis and its progression?

What if diseases were understood as traits involving entire networks of molecular changes driven by genetic and environmental changes?

These are just a few of the questions explored at the Center for Cancer Systems Biology (CCSB) First Annual Symposium held from May 2-3 at the Bechtel Conference Center. Closing registration in 1.5 days, the Symposium focused on modeling the role of cancer differentiation from experimental and computational biological perspectives. The main goal was to provide a better understanding of the self renewing properties of cancer for the identification of more effective therapeutic targets and strategies.

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According to CCSB Director Sylvia Plevritis, PhD, associate professor (diagnostic radiology) and co-director of ISIS (Information Sciences in Imaging at Stanford) (on left in photo): “Many opportunities for breakthrough discoveries in cancer lie at the intersection of multiple disciplines. In our first symposium on cancer systems biology, we highlighted the integration of experimental and computational disciplines. All of the presentations showed that the intersection of these disciplines is becoming almost seamless.” Both Andrew Gentles, PhD, senior research scientist (Department of Radiology) and scientific program manager of the CCSB, (on right in photo) as well as Anita Samantaray, MPH, CCSB program manager, (in middle in photo) also helped organize the Symposium. Read more about their success in Inside Stanford Medicine: “CCSB Makes Debut with Big Symposium."

Eighteen speakers from within and outside of Stanford presented their research to . . .

120 participants from industry as well as faculty, postdoctoral fellows, and undergraduates. CCSB Co-Director Garry Nolan, PhD, professor of Microbiology & Immunology, discussed his research on mass cytometry in “34 Parameter Single-Cell Mass Cytometry Delineates Clinically and Mechanistically Relevant Leukemic Differentiation Substructures.” His work in cytometry is featured in an article by Bruce Goldman from Inside Stanford Medicine, “The Soul of a Cell: Researchers Used Advanced Instrument to Read Cells' Minds.” “The new technology,” Goldman writes, “lets scientists take simultaneous measurements of dozens of features located on and in cells, whereas the existing technology typically begins to encounter technical limitations at about a half-dozen.”

Other presenters included Heiko Enderling, PhD, assistant professor at the Center of Cancer Biology from Tufts University School of Medicine, who spoke about cancer stem cells and early tumor dynamics in “Cancer Stem Cells, Tumor Dormancy and Self-Metastatic Growth”; Daphne Koller, PhD, professor of computer science at Stanford, who discussed differential regulation in related cell types in “A Model of Differential Regulation in Immune Cell Development and Disease Progression”; Andrea Califano, PhD, director of the Columbia Initiative Systems Biology, who presented “A Systems Biology Approach to Identify Oncogene and Non-Oncogene Dependencies in Human Malignancies”; and Eric Schadt, PhD, chief scientific officer of Pacific Biosciences and co-founder & director of Sage Bionetworks, who discussed models that predict complex system behavior in “A Multi-Scale Biology Approach for Linking the Molecular Biology of Disease to Clinical Medicine.” To read more about our CCSB presentations, please download the agenda here: Stanford CCSB Annual Symposium Agenda.pdf.

Attendees were excited about the first CCSB Annual Symposium. "It's truly rare to see such a collection of cutting-edge science, presented by several leaders in the field, discussed at a local symposium,” said Josh Stuart, PhD, associate professor of biomolecular engineering at the University of California, Santa Cruz (UCSC). “It had the collegiality and intensity of a prestigious Gordon Conference. I'm very much looking forward to next year." Postdoctoral fellow Stacey Adam in the Stanford Department of Medicine/Oncology commented that the “Annual CCSB Symposium was an excellent chance for our laboratory to highlight our recent work employing a systems biology approach to further analyze the mechanisms underlying oncogene addiction in our mouse models of cancer and receive feedback from leaders in the field of systems biology."

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One of 12 ( Centers for Cancer Systems Biology (CCSB) funded by the National Cancer Institute (NCI), the Center for Cancer Systems Biology was established by Sylvia Plevritis, PhD, who was awarded $12.8 million over 5 years to found the Center. Dr. Plevritis' Stanford CCSB, “Modeling the Role of Differentiation in Cancer Progression," has grown from another program that she directs: the Stanford Integrative Cancer Biology Program (ICBP).

Merging biological and computational research, the Center uncovers the molecular networks underlying tumorigenesis while providing resources to produce the next generation of cancer researchers. To read more about the CCSB, please access “$12 Million Grant to Fund New Approach to Cancer Study at Stanford" from Inside Stanford Medicine and “In the News: Sylvia Plevritis, PhD” from Scan Times. Please visit the CCSB website (http://ccsb.stanford.edu/) to explore fellowships and join our mailing list.

Awards and Honors: May 27, 2011

Gold01B.jpgGarry E. Gold, MD, associate professor of radiology and (by courtesy) bioengineering and orthopedics at Stanford University, has been named a Fellow of the International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine (ISMRM) for his “significant and substantial contributions to research in a field within the Society’s purposes” (from http://www.ismrm.org/ISMRMFAQ.htm#1).

Dr. Gold received his master's degree in electrical engineering from Stanford in 1988 and his MD from Stanford in 1992. He has authored over 60 journal articles, 170 abstracts, and 5 patents in MRI. He has been the principal investigator or a co-investigator on over 30 funded research projects, and he is the principal investigator on 2 NIH-funded projects to improve MR imaging of osteoarthritis and the use of real-time MRI for the study of biomechanics. He has been awarded a President’s Medal from the International Skeletal Society and the Lauterbur Award for the best MRI paper 6 times from the Society for Computed Body Tomography and Magnetic Resonance (SCBT/MR). Dr. Gold reviews manuscripts for 10 peer-reviewed journals, including the Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (JMRI) and the Journal of Magnetic Resonance in Medicine (MRM), and he is on the editorial board of several publications.

At Stanford, he practices clinical musculoskeletal radiology for medical students, residents, and fellows. He teaches 2 courses in imaging physics and human anatomy for medical students and graduate students, and he was recently awarded the Kaiser Award for outstanding and innovative contributions to education. He also serves as an advisor and co-advisor for many engineering graduate students and postdoctoral fellows. To view his prior blog postings, please access "Awards and Honors: February 22, 2010"; "Awards and Honors: March 25, 2009"; "Drs. Gold and Hargreaves' Osteoarthritis Research Featured on ABC7 News"; "Drs. Gold and Hargreaves Detect Osteoarthritis Using Sodium MRI"; "People and Their Pets: Humboldt"; "Awards and Honors: April 18, 2008"; "Awards and Honors: April 17, 2008"; "Awards and Honors: October 23, 2007"; "Awards and Honors: February 2007"; and "New Faculty Hires and Promotions: January 2006-February 2007"

Awards and Honors: May 19, 2011

Atlas2011_150.jpgScott W. Atlas, MD, professor and chief of neuroradiology as well as senior fellow at the Hoover Institution, received the University of Illinois Alumni Achievement Award on May 15, 2011, at the University of Illinois Commencement in Champaign-Urbana, Illinois in recognition of career achievement.

Established in 1957, this award is the highest honor bestowed upon alumni of the University of Illinois by the University of Illinois Alumni Association on behalf of the University. The award is presented to those alumni who have attained outstanding success and national or international distinction in their chosen business, profession, or life’s work, and whose accomplishments reflect admirably on or bring honor to their Alma Mater.

Recognized throughout the world as a leader in educational and clinical research, Dr. Atlas serves on the Nominating Committee for the Nobel Prize in Medicine and Physiology. He is also an adviser to major industry leaders in medical technology, and he has a special interest in healthcare public policy. Publishing than 100 scientific articles in leading journals, he is the editor of the foremost textbook within his field, Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Brain and Spine.

To read prior blog articles featuring Dr. Atlas, please access "Awards and Honors: May 18, 2011"; "In the News: Stanford's Neuroradiology Fellowship Program Ranked First in the U.S."; “'Research Gains at Risk' by Dr. Scott Atlas Featured in The Washington Times"; "Awards and Honors: March-April 2007"; "Awards and Honors: September 29, 2008"; "Sanford/Atlas: Alternatives to Government Health Takeover"; "Dr. Atlas' Commentary on Our Healthcare System Featured in The Washington Times"; and "Commentary by Dr. Atlas: 'Mr. Health Care: Ted Kennedy's Lifelong Passion' and 'Why Are These Health Care Fixes Ignored?'"


Announcements: Rad Staff Retreat, Thursday, June 30, 2011

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Our 2011 Radiology Staff Retreat has been moved to Thursday, June 30th. The day will start with a continental breakfast at the Frances C. Arriaga Alumni Center and will include a focus on professional development as well as a barbeque with Joe and TJ at the grill in the Chuck Taylor Grove (near Arriaga), located behind the Avery Aquatic Center next to the running track.

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You won't want to miss it! Our last retreat was in 2007!

If you have any questions, please contact one of the staff retreat committee members: Roni, Lourdes, Joe, TJ, Alice, and Teresa.

Awards and Honors: May 18, 2011

Atlas2011_150.jpgScott W. Atlas, MD, professor and chief of neuroradiology as well as senior fellow at the Hoover Institution, presented the 67th Annual George W. Holmes Lectureship entitled “Technology and Innovation in Radiology” at the New England Roentgen Ray Society (NERRS) meeting on April 8, 2011. Delivering his lecture at the Joseph B. Martin Conference Center at Harvard Medical School in Boston, Dr. Atlas spoke as part of the 92nd Annual Scientific Program of the NERRS, the oldest regional radiological society in America. To read more, please download the program: http://www.nerrs.org/pdf/NERRS_Booklet_2010.pdf.

Dr. Atlas is recognized as a world leader in both education and clinical research and has been on the Nominating Committee for the Nobel Prize in Medicine and Physiology for several years. His research has centered on advanced applications of new MRI technologies in neurologic diseases, and he has authored more than 120 scientific publications in leading journals. In addition, Dr. Atlas' work includes investigations into the effects of the changing healthcare marketplace on technology-based innovations in medicine, and he has lectured throughout the world on a variety of topics, most notably advances in MRI of the brain, and the key economic issues related to the future of such technology-based advances.

To read prior blog articles featuring Dr. Atlas, please access "In the News: Stanford's Neuroradiology Fellowship Program Ranked First in the U.S."; “'Research Gains at Risk' by Dr. Scott Atlas Featured in The Washington Times"; "Awards and Honors: March-April 2007"; "Awards and Honors: September 29, 2008"; "Sanford/Atlas: Alternatives to Government Health Takeover"; "Dr. Atlas' Commentary on Our Healthcare System Featured in The Washington Times"; and "Commentary by Dr. Atlas: 'Mr. Health Care: Ted Kennedy's Lifelong Passion' and 'Why Are These Health Care Fixes Ignored?'"

Team MIPS Cycling for Cancer Research in the Canary Century

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TEAM MIPS (L to R): Parag Mallick, Amit Hetsron, Matt Noll, Arne Vandenbroucke, Frederick Chin, Magdalena Bazalova, Ben Hackel, Nick Hughes, Nicole Ackerman, and Erik Mittra (photo courtesy of Amy Morris)

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TEAM MIPS with Dr. Sanjiv Sam Gambhir (L to R): Nick Hughes, Ben Hackel, Cindy Welton, Amit Hetsron, Frederick Chin, Sanjiv Sam Gambhir, and Erik Mittra
(photo courtesy of Fred Chin)


By Julie Ruiz-Wibbelsmann, PhD

What would motivate a former competitive swimmer to ride 100 miles on a 17-year old bike over hilly, twisty roads while battling head winds and climbing over 6,000 feet in elevation? And what would cause a tennis player to join him on his mountain bike?

According to Frederick Chin, PhD, and Nick Hughes, DPhil, MSc, MEng, it was the encouragement of their colleague, Erik Mittra, MD, PhD, over dinner at a MIPS (Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford) event that convinced them to participate in the Canary Century 100-mile ride and eventually form Team MIPS. The team, according to Fred Chin, has “dialed it up another notch and will all be sporting a chic cycling kit” designed by himself and Jim Strommer, MIPS marketing & communications manager.

Already a seasoned cyclist, Erik easily convinced Fred Chin to join him on the ride. Their colleague Nick needed little convincing to play less tennis and do more cycling to train for the Century. And so, Team MIPS acquired its first members. Nick Hughes, DPhil, MSc, MEng; Ben Hackel, PhD; Amit Hetsron, MSc; Parag Mallick, PhD; Magdalena Bazalova, PhD; Nicole Ackerman; and Matt Noll joined the team shortly after.

However, if you ask Team MIPS the main reason why they decided to participate in the first Canary Century bike ride, they will tell you that they were motivated by . . .

the opportunity to benefit cancer research and patient care. By cycling, they are helping the Canary Foundation (http://www.canaryfoundation.org/) raise funds for the Stanford Cancer Center (SCC), which is world-renown for its state-of-the-art clinical care, research, and technology.

Team MIPS has been training intensively for the first annual Canary Century on May 28, 2011, along with 33 other teams and 1,200 participants and spectators. Beginning and finishing at the VA Palo Alto Health Care System at 3801 Miranda Avenue, they will ride 100 miles over Skyline Boulevard, through Pescadero and San Gregorio, onto Highway 1 and back down to the start/finish in Palo Alto at the VA Health Care System . Team MIPS will also have the chance to ride with members of the Garmin-Cervélo professional team, which is 1 of 20 teams that compete in the Tour de France. Cervélo designs, builds, and markets high performance road and triathlon bicycles. To watch Erik Mittra and Fred Chin on the Canary Century Channel, please access the Canary Century website at http://www.canarycentury.com/2011/04/12/more-new-videos/.

Erik_Canary_150.jpgWhen Team MIPS starts their ride the morning of May 28th, each member will have completed his or her own individually designed training program. ERIK MITTRA has been cycling since high school, so when he received an email about the Canary Century, he couldn’t wait to participate: “I’m a member of the Stanford Cancer Center, so I jumped at the opportunity to raise funds for the Center and to recruit my friends and colleagues to join me. The support from everyone has been tremendous.”

Each rider on Team MIPS is well aware of the importance of early cancer detection. As a clinical instructor of nuclear medicine, Erik is involved with patient care, including read-outs of positron emission tomography (PET) and nuclear medicine (NM) studies. He also performs therapies and some lab research. Although he is an experienced cyclist who has completed around 8 century rides, Erik is still training for the Canary Century because it’s a particularly hilly course. Since he and Fred started training together, his goals have changed: “Initially, I was planning to ride fast and get a good time, but now I’m more interested in Team MIPS, and I’ve really been enjoying training with Fred. So, my plan for the Century is to try to keep everyone on the team together so that we all finish in time and enjoy the ride.”

FredsBike_350.jpgFor FRED CHIN, the benefits of the Century are three-fold. First, as head of cyclotron radiochemistry for MIPS and Stanford Radiology, he develops and produces the radiopharmaceuticals that are used in conjunction with positron emission tomography/single-photon emission computed tomography (PET/SPECT) imaging for the early detection of cancer. Second, in addition to his desire to support early detection, Fred is riding in honor of 3 of his grandparents who each died from different forms of cancer: ovarian, spinal, and esophageal. Third, he is riding to improve his personal fitness. In December 2009, he and his family were struck by a drunk driver, which sent Fred to the hospital. Since then, he has been slowly recovering from a shoulder injury that prevented him from lifting the weight of his arm. Yet his recovery progressed well enough to resume playing softball and coaching our departmental team, the Radiology Rays, who won the 2009 Stanford University Medical Center (SUMC) Division-C Championship.

Trying to balance time between work and family while getting back into shape has been challenging for Fred, who swam the butterfly and breaststroke and served as the varsity swim team captain in high school. He kept fit in college by participating in a variety of intramural sports including cycling, so the Century ride has been a great motivation to return to training. However, cycling with Team MIPS hasn’t been easy, in part, because he is using a 17-year old Trek 2100 bike with a composite carbon frame that was state-of-the-art when he bought it in college during the 1990s: “Erik, my teammate, recently bought a new bike that’s very sophisticated and is 5 to 10 pounds lighter than mine, but I prefer losing more pounds in body weight than buying a new bike to cut down on my load for climbing hills! So, until I reach my target physical shape, I have deferred buying a new bike for now. It has been challenging training for this 100-mile ride, in part, because it includes climbing a total elevation of more than 6,000 feet; however, it’s very minor compared to what cancer patients have to endure. I want to do my small part to raise awareness and funds for this worthy fight to win our battle against cancer by way of early detection. To do this with friends like Erik and the others on Team MIPS makes it that more special.”

Fred is following a training regiment from a recent seminar he attended, “100 Mile Ride 100 Days from Now: How to Get Started and to Prepare,” sponsored by the Canary Century. He began by riding 10 to 15 miles a week and has been slowly increasing this distance by 5% every week over the course of 13 weeks. The last weekend of March, he road 70 miles, so he is quickly approaching the Century distance.

Nick_250.jpgLike Fred, Team MIPS member NICK HUGHES is riding in his first century. More of a tennis player than a cyclist, Nick began riding twice a week at 6:30 AM. He has combined this training regime with a longer ride on the weekend, which is becoming progressively longer as he nears May 28th: “I’ve been training on a mountain bike with big, heavy tires. A few weeks ago, I didn’t think I could do this race on a mountain bike, but my training is going pretty well. After completing 50 miles last weekend over a hilly course, I think I can finish the Century on a mountain bike.” A postdoctoral fellow in the Multimodality Molecular Imaging Lab (MMIL), Nick performs bench research in cancer therapy monitoring as well as early cancer detection and is investigating strategies for integrating cancer imaging data, gene expression profiles, and blood biomarkers.

Ben_250.jpgWhile Nick will complete the ride on a mountain bike, BEN HACKEL will finish the Century on a hybrid bike. Spending 80% of his workday at the Canary Center at Stanford for Cancer Early Detection and 20% at the Clark Center, Ben needed little convincing to join the Canary Century when he saw the flier advertising the ride: “I’m not much of a cyclist. I prefer basketball, football, baseball, tennis, and softball—I play on the Radiology Rays softball team. However, I love outdoor activities and, so far, the cycling training has been great. I cycle to and from work every day and on weekends when my family is out of town. I’ve already completed a ride that was over 70 miles on my hybrid bike.” Like Nick, Ben is also a postdoctoral fellow in the Multimodality Molecular Imaging Lab (MMIL). He performs bench research in cancer therapy monitoring and early cancer detection with a focus on the development of molecular imaging agents for early cancer detection.

Coming to the United States from Israel has greatly improved AMIT HETSRON’s riding. Since January 2010, Amit has been working as a MIPS research radiochemist in the Radiochemistry Facility. For the first 3 months in the United States, he was unable to work because he was waiting for his work permit. So before buying furniture, the first thing Amit bought was a road bike, and he cycled for 3 months and lost 10 pounds. An avid cyclist, Amit has been riding for 19 years, beginning before his bar mitzvah when he was 13-years old. His training rides include 20 to 25 miles twice during the week and longer rides (70 to 90 miles) on the weekends.

Amit_Canary_250.jpgWhen he was first invited to join Team MIPS by Fred, Amit was a bit worried about getting enough sponsors for the ride because he knew only one person when he arrived in the United States: his wife, who is finishing the Stanford Program in International Legal Studies (SPILS) at Stanford Law School. However, once he began asking his friends back home, Amit found many who were happy to sponsor his ride. One of his friends revealed to him that her uncle had just died of stomach cancer, which had been found in the late stages one month earlier. Amit is completing the Canary Century because he knows there are some journeys that others have to take that are much harder than riding 100 miles.

One of Amit’s teammates, MAGDALENA BAZALOVA, is a postdoctoral fellow in the Imaging Radiobiology Laboratory (IRL) who investigates dose enhanced radiation therapy for cancer treatment. She first saw a flyer for the Canary Century while she was working at California Avenue, where the Canary Foundation is housed. After Fred sent her an email encouraging her to join Team MIPS, she decided to do so.

Magdalena_Canary_250.jpgAs a member of the Stanford Radiology Rays softball team, Magdalena already knew some of the Team MIPS riders. She has also been a cyclist for a long time. She biked 1,700 miles across western Canada after finishing her PhD 2 years ago. Although she likes hiking, cycling is her sport of choice because it allows her to get to know an area really well while covering great distances at fast speeds. Exploring California’s beautiful coasts and challenging hills has been an adventure, so she is looking forward to the Century.

Nicole_150.jpgNICOLE ACKERMAN, physics PhD candidate in radiation oncology, started biking primarily for transportation as an undergraduate at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in Cambridge, Massachusetts. She bought her first bike for $30 on Craigslist: “When I lost that bike in a collision with an SUV, a colleague procured another bike for me—a steel-frame road bike that I still ride. I bought a nicer road bike when I moved to California in 2007.” Unfortunately, Nicole has been very busy the past month with travel and research, so her training has been limited. However, she does bike a few miles between work and home every day and she completes a cardio workout 2 or 3 times a week (photo courtesy of Amy Morris).

As a physics PhD student completing research in radiation oncology, Nicole performs simulation work for both imaging and treatment. Switching from the world of particle physics to cancer research, she has a vested interest in the Canary Century: “I am surprised by how the funding for cancer research compares to particle physics. It takes many millions of dollars (or billions) to do anything in particle physics, but some cancer research projects need only a few thousand. The research at Stanford is incredible, so the money raised by this event could really make a difference."

PARAG MALLICK, assistant professor of radiology as well as member of the Canary Center at Stanford for Cancer Early Detection and Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford (MIPS), also joined the ride to help make a difference. Parag_Canary_150.jpgAs a new faculty member at the Canary Center, he heard about the ride and immediately wanted to help, either as a participant or as an on-course observer, who could answer questions about research at Stanford and the Canary Center (photo courtesy of Amy Morris).

For Parag, the value of the Canary Century extends beyond a one-day ride: “I think it's really important to let people know about our research efforts and their impact on cancer. I also think it's important for me to be able to hear some of the stories told by the Canary Century participants about their own wars on cancer, either personally or through a friend or family member. Those stories help keep the problem tangible and present. When cancer is just a statistic about X number people dying or Y% of people contracting lung cancer, it is easy for research efforts to become abstract scientific inquiries. By having continual contact with people whose lives have been altered by cancer, we can stay focused on trying to solve problems that will have both a short- and long-term, real-world impact on eliminating the tragedies inflicted by cancer. It's really important to keep those people in your head, EVERY day. Even though you work on the problem to help EVERYONE, it's the faces, stories, frustrations, and sadness of PARTICULAR people that really keep you on track and motivated. The ride gives me an opportunity to hear those stories that fuel my crusade against this disease.”

Although he completed a half iron man last year, Parag hurt himself afterwards and had to have knee surgery that required a 6-month recovery. The Canary Century is his first major ride since his injury. However, he has been cycling since he was a boy scout, and in graduate school, biking was an important part of his lab because his graduate advisor was a cycling enthusiast. To prepare for the Century, Parag has been cross training 5 days each week by swimming or taking a spin class. On Saturdays, he tries to go for one long ride: “I'm sure it isn't enough--they've got some brutal hills around here!”

Parag’s teammate MATT NOLL, graduate student in the Imaging Radiobiology Laboratory (IRL), has also been training consistently by riding every day to and from home and work with two 20 mile rides per week and one 50 mile plus ride with hills. Riding for over 3 years, Matt bought his first road bike, an older Trek OCLV 5200 carbon, when he lived in Pennsylvania. When he moved here for graduate school, he became very involved in cycling, and the Radiology Rays softball team.

bike_200.jpgMatt is finishing his master’s in applied physics and collaborating with Ted Graves, PhD, assistant professor, (radiation oncology-radiation physics), on research in pre-clinical radiation oncology to improve neurological radiation therapy treatments and the methods for treating pre-clinical tumor models. Consequently, the Canary Century is closely linked with his work: “I'm doing the ride because it is a really great event. The funds go toward a wonderful cause that I am directly involved with through my work, and cycling is an activity that I love to do.”

Even though members of Team MIPS will begin their ride on May 28th using different means to prepare, they will each share a common goal: to finish before being picked up by the “SAG wagon.” Riders not finishing before 5 PM will be picked up by the “Support And Gear” (SAG) wagon driven by the “Support Aid Group.” The SAG wagon is a special vehicle equipped with tools and supplies to help repair minor bike problems.

You can visit the Team MIPS web page as well as the individual pages of Fred, Nick, Erik, Ben, Amit, Parag, Magdalena, Nicole, and Matt on the Canary Century website at http://www.canarycentury.com/.

Come cheer them on when they start between 6 AM to 8 AM on May 28th at the VA Palo Alto Health Care System (3801 Miranda Avenue)!

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(photo courtesy of Amy Morris)


Announcements: ISIS May Seminar Series

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For more information, please contact Danae Barnes, administrative program manager.

Announcements: Cardinal Walk on Friday, May 13th

Come walk 1.25 miles around our campus with your Stanford colleagues on Friday, May 13th!

The 5th Annual Cardinal Walk will begin at Roble Field at 12:10 PM. Provost John Etchemendy will be leading the walk. Last year, more than 1,200 Stanford members participated in the walk. There will also be a Spirit Contest, and trophies will given to the most spirited small, medium, and large groups!

Sponsored by BeWell, the walk is a free event. For more information, please access the BeWell website at http://bewell.stanford.edu/cardinal-walk-2011.

National Nurses Week: “Nurses Trusted to Care”

flowers.jpgCommitted to their profession, our nurses provide the highest standard of care. To honor their contributions, Stanford Hospital & Clinics (SHC) and the Radiology Department planned special activities during the week of May 2nd to May 6th in celebration of National Nurses Week.

In addition to the festivities hosted by SHC, our Department honored our nurses with a variety of activities including a special breakfast by the Ultrasound Section and another by the Computed Tomography Section; a rose plant from the Image Library; cake, pastries, and ice cream from the Radiology Administration; a lunch by the Magnetic Resonance Imaging Section; and a second lunch at Bing courtesy of the Radiology Administration and Harm Madra, RN, nurse manager.

Each RN also received a special water bottle as token of appreciation for all their hard work. Radiologic nurses Lisa Parker, RN, and Colleen Kawakami, RN, BSN, created a poster featuring the contributions of Radiology RNs, which was displayed in the Hospital Atrium all week long.

Established in 1954, National Nurses Week recognizes the multiple contributions to our health care system by the 3.1 million licensed registered nurses (RN) in the United States (from the American Nurses Association Website). According to the American Nurses Association, this year’s theme for the 2011 National Nurses Week, “Nurses Trusted to Care,” encapsulates how “nursing is a profession that embraces dedicated people with varied interests, strengths and passions because of the many opportunities the profession offers. As nurses, we work in emergency rooms, school based clinics, and homeless shelters, to name a few. We have many roles–from staff nurse to educator to nurse practitioner and nurse researcher–and serve all of them with passion for the profession and with a strong commitment to patient safety.”

For more information on the history of National Nurses Week, please visit the American Nurses Association website. Please also see 2010 blog article, “Celebrating Our Nurses: 'Caring Today for a Healthier Tomorrow.'"

Awards and Honors: May 5, 2011

DSouza_0071_100.jpgAloma D'Souza, PhD, research scientist in the laboratory of Dr. Gary M. Glazer, chair of Stanford Radiology and Emma Pfeiffer Merner Professor in the Medical Sciences, has received the 2011 "Highly Rated Poster Award" at the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) 102nd Annual Meeting in Orlando, FL. The abstract and poster ranked in the top 2% of the accepted abstracts at the meeting.

Her award-winning poster entitled "A Novel Method of Tumor Characterization by Protein and microRNA Biomarker Release Using Ultrasound" is her second poster award. In 2010, she and Dr. Glazer were honored with the Award Winning Poster in the category of “Ultrasonic Imaging and Drug Delivery” at the World Molecular Imaging Conference.

Dr. D'Souza joined the Department in July of 2007 as the laboratory manager for Dr. Glazer. Together with Dr. Sam Gambhir, MD, PhD, she runs a research laboratory that focuses on studying the effects of low frequency ultrasound on the release of biomarkers and earlier cancer detection. Dr. D'Souza received her doctorate degree and completed a postdoctoral fellowship in biochemistry at Rush University, Chicago, where her research centered on cartilage biomarkers, in vitro engineered cartilage, and osteoarthritis. Prior to Stanford, Dr. D'Souza worked at Genentech, Inc., in the Department of Molecular Oncology. Her work included the functional identification and characterization of tumor over-expressed proteins and the evaluation of potential targets for intervention with therapeutic agents. In her spare time, she enjoys traveling, photography and art.

Stanford Radiology Welcomes Amit Hetsron, MSc

Hetsron_Amit.jpgAmit Hetsron, MSc, is a visiting radiochemist working in our Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford (MIPS) Radiochemistry Facility.

In 2006, he earned his BSc in biological chemistry from the Ariel University Center in Ariel, Israel. In 2009, he received an MSc in organic chemistry from Bar-Ilan University, in Ramat Gan, Israel, after conducting an independent research project mentored by Professors Shimon A. Shatzmiler and Izhak Mastai. Amit's thesis focused on the synthesis of chiral PNA and on hybridization tests of this product with DNA. He has published parts of his research in a journal article entitled “Synthesis of Chiral Heteronucleotide ONA Sequences by a Fmoc/Boc-Based Submonomeric Strategy” in the International Journal of Peptide Research and Therapeutics (2009;15:241–246). During his studies, Amit also worked as a research and teaching assistant in analytical chemistry and presented weekly lectures to undergraduate students.

From 2008 to 2010, Amit joined the Hadassah Medical Organization Cyclotron Unit, where he worked as a researcher under the supervision of Professor Eyal Mishani from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Amit conducted many experiments, including extensive research on 18[F] peptides labeling via click chemistry. He recently presented parts of his work at the World Molecular Imaging Congress in Kyoto, Japan.

Announcements: Cancer Systems Biology Annual Symposium "Systems Biology of Cancer" May 2 and 3

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Please download the agenda here: Stanford CCSB Annual Symposium Agenda.pdf.

Event Parking: Galvez Field Parking Lot. Breakfast and lunch will be provided.
Questions? Please contact Anita Samantaray, MPH, CCSB Program Manager, at 650.725.6070.

Celebrating 2 Years of Service: Mark Coleman

Coleman_Mark.jpgApril 2011 denotes Mark Coleman' s 2 years of service working as an MRI technologist at Stanford Hospital & Clinics. He describes his Stanford experience as follows: "I started my affiliation with Stanford as a travel MRI tech for 1 year, and secretly liked it here. However, I left Stanford for a year on another assignment. I returned a little over 3 years ago, and I signed-on for another year-long assignment, and found that I couldn't leave Stanford. So, I've now been here for 2 years as a full-time employee."

Prior to coming to Stanford, Mark worked as a staff technologist for 3 years in a CT/MRI department in Tulsa, Oklahoma. He left this position to become a travel MR technologist for 3 years before arriving at Stanford.

Mark received his technologist training from a hospital-based program in Fort Smith, Arkansas, which he finished in 2000. A year later, he completed his bachelor's degree in health and applied sciences from the University of Central Arkansas. Mark has also served in the U.S. Army and U.S. Army Reserves. His main hobbies seem to be activities involving 2 wheels: "Motorbiking is the most fun, but I am getting into mountain biking."

In the News: Dr. Avnesh Thakor, MD, PhD, and Colleagues in the Laboratory of Sanjiv Sam Gambhir, MD, PhD

SciTranMedCover.jpgGold nanoparticles as small as 100 nanometers in diameter may soon be used for early cancer detection in humans according to ground-breaking research by Dr. Thakor and his colleagues in the lab of Dr. Gambhir. Injecting gold nanoparticles into mice that attached to colorectal cancer cells, they were able to image the gold-marked cells through the light they emitted by using a Raman spectroscope. Without any toxicity to the surrounding tissues, they detected early colorectal cancer in mice. Their research is featured on the cover of Science Translational Medicine 2011;3(79).

According to Bruce Goldman in "Research Moves Nanomedicine One Step Closer to Reality" from Inside Stanford Medicine, "[t]his marks the first step up the ladder of toxicology studies that, within a year and a half, could yield to human trials of the tiny agents for detection of colorectal and possibly other cancers." Please also see "Raman Effect Makes Cancer Detection Possible" from Mangalorean.com, which describes their research.

To read the original research article published by Dr. Thakor and his colleagues, "The Fate and Toxicity of Raman-Active Silica-Gold Nanoparticles in Mice," please access Science Translational Medicine 2011;3(79) (DOI: 10.1126/scitranslmed.3001963) (co-authors: Richard Luong, Ramasamy Paulmurugan, Frank I. Lin, Paul Kempen, Cristina Zavaleta, Pauline Chu, Tarik F. Massoud, Robert Sinclair, Sanjiv S. Gambhir).

Retiree "Outstanding in the Field"

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After 19 years of service, our 1.5T magnetic resonance magnet is retiring. MRI_1.5.jpg
Gary Glover, PhD, director of the Radiological Sciences Laboratory in the Richard M. Lucas Center for Imaging, praised the 1.5T as "outstanding in its (magnetic) field" at its retirement party on Monday, April 18th, in front of a crowd of 1.5T users and admirers.

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For years, the 1.5T has been maintained as a cutting-edge research instrument, . . .

allowing researchers access to the highest quality MRI facilities anywhere. Animals from mice to elephant seals, aircraft engine turbine blades, and humans have been imaged in thousands of studies by Lucas users including students, fellows, and faculty researchers from our Department as well as more than a dozen other departments on campus and extramurally.

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Serving the Stanford Department of Radiology since the opening of the Lucas Center in 1992, the 1.5T is approaching End-of-Life and will be replaced by a new GE 3T 750. The removal and replacement is expected to be completed by October of 2011.

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To read more about the Richard M. Lucas Center for Imaging, please access "The Richard M. Lucas Center for Imaging Celebrates Over 15 Years of Service."


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April Speed Dating Presentations: Finding Your Research Collaborator

"Speed Dating" presentations by our faculty are designed to be brief, 4-minute snapshots of a single research focus to help broaden awareness of departmental work and to stimulate new collaborations.

At the Wednesday, April 13th, noon research conference, the following faculty presented their research (please contact them if you have any questions):


Dr. Michael Moseley: "'New School' MRI: Susceptibility"

Dr. Daniel Spielman: "Imaging Metabolism Using Hyperpolarized 13C MRS"

Dr. Shreyas Vasanawala: "Body MRI"


In the News: Heike Daldrup-Link, MD, and Joe Wu, MD, PhD


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Research by Drs. Daldrup-Link and Wu was recently featured in a BioTechniques article by Jeffrey M. Perkel, PhD: "What Lies Beneath: In Vivo Stem Cell Imaging" BioTechniques 2011;50(4): 223–227 (WhatLiesBeneathPDF.pdf).

Both Daldrup-Link and Wu are exploring ways to track stem cells in vivo. Heike Daldrup-Link, associate professor of radiology and member of the Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford (MIPS), is developing MRI techniques for in vivo imaging of stem cells and cancer cells. Using superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIO) as a contrast agent, she and her team are studying the survival of stem cell implants in a rat model of arthritis to learn more about implant viability.

In addition to contrast agents, stem cells can be tracked through labeling with reporter genes. While Daldrup-Link's Translational Tumor and Stem Cell MR Imaging Lab is exploring this technique using MRI, Joe Wu, associate professor of medicine and radiology, and his Cardiovascular Gene and Cell Therapy Lab are researching the use of bioluminescence to image complex multigene reporters containing both fluorescent proteins and luciferase to study human embryonic stem cell biology. Labeling these cells with the luciferase reporter gene and injecting them into mice, Wu and his team have been able to image tumor growth as well as the therapeutic benefits of reporter genes on inhibiting this growth.

To read more, please access "What Lies Beneath: In Vivo Stem Cell Imaging."

Announcements: Stanford Center for Cancer Systems Biology (CCSB) April Seminar Series

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For more information, please contact Anita Samantaray, MPH, CCSB Program Manager, at 650.725.6070.

New Staff Hires and Promotions: Amy Morris

amy_smile72.jpg Amy Morris, graphic designer, recently joined our Department full-time, after working as our temporary visual arts specialist since March of 2008.

Amy has over 10 years of experience in the design business. Prior to coming to Stanford, she worked as a freelance designer while also working as a software interface designer at IBM, where she contributed to a U.S. patent and 4 patent applications. While getting her design degree, Amy was employed as a senior loan processor at a mortgage company. In addition, she holds a California Real Estate License.

Amy has an active life outside of work: "I have 5 children, ages 2, 4, 5, 11, and 14. I love to spend time with them and watch how extraordinary everyday things are in their eyes; I think it keeps me young and open-minded. I am an avid cake artist, and I love a challenge! I enjoy circuit training, intense cardio, and strength training; I’m also a fitness coach."

Stanford's Holi Festival 2011

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On Sunday, April 3rd, hundreds gathered at Stanford's Sandhill fields to celebrate the Holi Festival welcoming the coming of spring! Our own Mandeep Kaur, radiology administrative associate, was there to celebrate with her friends and sisters! The festival of colors is a wonderful opportunity to reconnect with family and friends to rejuvenate social ties.

Participants covered themselves and each other in 3,500 pounds of food-grade powdered dye in 5 different colors--all starch based with no harmful chemicals. They also enjoyed Indian food provided by a local restaurant and dance performances by popular Bay Area dance troupes. The Festival was sponsored by Asha for Education, and proceeds will help support educational movements for the underprivileged in India.

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To read more about Holi and to see more photos, please access the Asha for Education website at http://www.ashanet.org/stanford/events/holi2011/index.html.

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March WOW Card Winners!

Wow!! Congrats!!!

Radiology Hospital employees regularly acknowledge each other’s hard work by posting their positive comments on WOW cards. Here are the March 2011 awardees:*

Brooke Cibik
Sam Dong
Joann Esselborn
Orwson Garcia
Marianne Johnson
Harm Madra
Spencer Miller
Muriel Munoz
Navy Lu
Angela Nath
Amanda Nelson
Noelyn Redrico
Rachel Reyes
Annette Scott
Gordon Shattock
Jasjit Singh
Janis Troeger
Lillie Utley
Peter Weintraub

For February WOW Card winners, please access http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2011/03/february-wow-ca.html.

*Thanks to Noemy Quiroz for compiling this list.

Announcements: CBIS Seminar "X-Ray Visible Stem Cells for Enhanced Delivery and Engraftment in Cardiovascular Disease"

When: April 6, 2011 from 2:30-3:30pm
Where: Li Ka Shing Center, Room 120
What: Dr. Dara Kraitchman will present "X-Ray Visible Stem Cells for Enhanced Delivery and Engraftment in Cardiovascular Disease" presented by

Research Interests
Dr. Kraitchman's research interests are concentrated on non-invasive imaging and minimally invasive treatment of cardiovascular disease. She has been actively involved in developing new methods to image myocardial function and perfusion using MRI. Her current research interests focus on determining the optimal timing and method of administration of mesenchymal stem cells to regenerate infarcted myocardium using non-invasive MR fluoroscopic delivery and imaging. MRI and radiolabeling techniques include novel MR and radiotracer stem cell labeling methods to determine the location, quantity, and biodistribution of stem cells after delivery as well as to noninvasively determine the efficacy of these therapies in acute myocardial infarction and peripheral arterial disease.

Dara L. Kraitchman, VMD, PhD, FACC, is from the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, where she is also a member of the Department of Molecular and Comparative Pathobiology Institute for NanoBioTechnology and the Institute for Computation Medicine.

Abstract
Despite rapid translation of stem cell therapies into clinical practice, the treatment for cardiovascular disease with stem and progenitor cells has not yet yielded satisfactory results. Non-invasive imaging techniques could provide greater insight into not only the therapeutic benefit, but also the fundamental mechanisms that underlie stem cell fate, migration, survival and engraftment in vivo. Over the last several decades, microencapsulation methods have been developed for immunoprotection of cellular therapies. Recently, our group has developed a novel family of “imaging visible” microencapsulation techniques to enhance stem cell survival, prevent immunorejection of allogeneic stem cells, and enable tracking with MRI, X-ray, and ultrasonic imaging. Examples of the first X-ray visible delivery and tracking techniques for use in cardiovascular disease will be discussed.

For more information, please contact Teresa Newton, administrative associate.

Announcements: Earth Day 2011

Connecting the Dots: The Food, Energy, Water, and Climate Nexus

WHEN: Friday, April, 22, 2011
1:00 pm to 6:30 pm

Where: Bishop Auditorium
518 Memorial Way
Stanford University

Faculty participants from Stanford will include:
•Stacey Bent (TomKat Center for Sustainable Energy, Precourt Institute for Energy) Welcome

•Roz Naylor (Program on Food Security and the Environment, Environmental Earth
System Science, Woods Institute for the Environment) The Global Food Challenge

•Chris Field (Carnegie Institution Department of Global Ecology) The Food-Energy Nexus

•David Lobell (Program on Food Security and the Environment, Environmental Earth System Science, Woods Institute for the Environment) The Food-Climate Nexus

•Buzz Thompson (Stanford Law School, Woods Institute for the Environment) The Food-Water Nexus

•Mariano-Florentino Cuellar (Center for International Security and Cooperation, Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies) The Food-Security Nexus

•Dean Pamela Matson (School of Earth Sciences) The Way Forward, panel moderated by Dean Matson

Breakout session topics will include the carbon footprint of food; aquaculture; ecosytem services; and sustainable meat.

Registration is required with priority given to Stanford students, faculty, and staff, and to others in the Stanford community. Please register at: http://www.regonline.com/Register/Checkin.aspx?EventID=950047. For more information, please access: http://connectingthedots.stanford.edu/.

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Announcements: 2011 Robert Hofstadter Memorial Lectures

On Monday, April 4th, and Tuesday, April 5th, the Department of Physics at Stanford University is sponsoring two 2011 Robert Hofstadter Memorial Lectures by theoretical physicist Professor N. David Mermin, Horace White Professor of Physics (Emeritus) at Cornell University.

1) “Spooky Actions at a Distance”
When: Monday, April 4, 2011, 8:00 PM; evening public lecture
Where: Hewlett Teaching Center, 370 Serra Mall, Rm. 200

2) “What Has Quantum Mechanics to Do with Factoring?”
When: Tuesday, April 5, 2011, 4:15 PM ; afternoon colloquium
Where: Hewlett Teaching Center, 370 Serra Mall, Rm. 201

For more information, please download this flyer 2011RobertHofstadterMemorialLectures.pdf, or visit the Stanford Physics Dept. website at http://www.stanford.edu/dept/physics/events/2011/hofstadter.html .

Announcements: ISIS April Seminar Series

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For more information, please contact Danae Barnes, administrative program manager.

Announcements: 2011 Center for Biomedical Imaging at Stanford (CBIS) Symposium on March 29

The 2011 CBIS Symposium, "Pushing the Limits of Imaging: Faster, Higher Stronger," will take place from 8:30 AM to 4:30 PM on March 29th at the Li Ka Shing Center on the 2nd floor. Dr. Rod Pettigrew, director of the NIH NIBIB, will be the keynote speaker. Please access the complete information for the symposium at http://cbis.stanford.edu/symposium/program.html.

Announcements: RIGS Match Event, April 4th at 7 PM

The Radiology Interest Group (RIGS) at Stanford has organized a panel of clinical medical students who have matched this year in various radiology residency programs. Students interested in applying to a radiology residency program are invited to come ask questions about the application and interview process as well as to hear the panelists share their strategies.

The event will be held on April 4th at 7 PM in the Lucas Center Conference Room (P083); dinner will be provided. Please RSVP (RIGS.Match.Event@gmail.com). To find out more information, please access the RIGS website at http://rigs.stanford.edu/.

Awards and Honors: March 28, 2011

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Kazim Narsinh, research fellow in the Multimodality Molecular Imaging Laboratory (MMIL), has been awarded the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) Research & Education Foundation's Research Medical Student Grant for his proposal "Imaging Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocyte Transplants." Mentored by Dr. Wu, Kazim's research interests include induced pluripotent stem cell biology, multimodal molecular imaging, and gene- and cell-based therapies for cardiovascular disease. Some of his work was recently published in the March 1, 2011 issue of the Journal of Clinical Investigation: "Single Cell Transcriptional Profiling Reveals Heterogeneity of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells" (121(3):1217-21).

Kazim studied Biochemistry at UC Berkeley prior to attending medical school at UC San Diego. He will begin his general surgery internship at Stanford in July 2011.

To read about his prior award, please access "Awards and Honors II: April 20, 2009."

In the News: Research by the Cancer Molecular Imaging Chemistry Laboratory (CMICL)

Research by the Cancer Molecular Imaging Chemistry Laboratory (CMICL) was chosen as the feature cover for the March 16, 2011 edition of Bioconjugate Chemistry. Led by Zhen Cheng, PhD, assistant professor of radiology, the CMICL published their featured research in an article entitled "Radiolabeled Affibody-Albumin Bioconjugates for HER2-Positive Cancer Targeting" (Bioconjugate Chem 2011;22(3):413–421).

The Translational Molecular Imaging Lab's "New Breed of Contrast Agents" Featured in Medical Imaging Technology

Ground-breaking research by Juergen Willmann, MD, assistant professor of radiology (abdominal imaging) and head of the "Translational Molecular Imaging Lab (TMIL)," and his colleagues was recently featured in "Nowhere to Hide: The New Breed of Contrast Agents" published in Medical Imaging Technology (2011; v.1).

The article describes how Dr. Willmann and his Translational Molecular Imaging Lab (TMIL) have created targeted contrast agents by pairing microbubbles with peptides that can combine with cancer cells, allowing their detection using targeted contrast-enhanced ultrasound. This technique has the potential to allow physicians to identify tumors in their early stages. According to Dr. Willmann, synthesizing peptides "gives us great flexibility as we can modify the peptides to make them attach to different markers that we think are important for early cancer detection."

To read more about their molecular imaging research, please access "Nowhere to Hide: The New Breed of Contrast Agents."

In the News: Joseph Wu, MD, PhD

Wu_100100.jpgStem cell research by Dr. Wu, associate professor of medicine & radiology, was recently featured in "New Method Allows Human Embryonic Stem Cells to Avoid Immune System Rejection, Study Finds" from Inside Stanford Medicine.

The article details Dr. Wu's research of three "immune-dampening" drugs called costimulatory blockers. These drugs enable the survival of transplanted human embryonic stem cells and human induced pluripotent stem cells in mouse models. His research has the potential to allow the transplantation of pluripotent stem cells into humans to treat disease or injury.

Dr. Wu has published the results of his research in an article entitled "Short-Term Immunosuppression Promotes Engraftment of Embryonic and Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells" (Cell Stem Cell 2011; 8 (3): 309-17), along with first author Jeremy Pearl, who is a Stanford medical student and member of the Cardiovascular Gene and Cell Therapy Lab (CGCT).

Awards and Honors: March 24, 2011

Hsiao100.jpgAlbert Hsiao, MD, PhD, third-year Stanford radiology resident, has been awarded the Residents in Radiology President’s Award from the American Roentgen Ray Society (ARRS), which he will receive at the 2011 ARRS.

Mentored by Dr. Shreyas Vasanawala, Dr. Hsiao won the award for his manuscript on 4D phase-contrast MRI tentatively entitled "Fast Pediatric Cardiac MR Flow and Ventricular Volume Assessment" (co-authored by Drs. Michael Lustig, Marcus Alley, Mark Murphy, Frandics Chan, Robert Herfkens, and Shreyas Vasanawala). This project demonstrates that accurate flow and volume measurements could be simultaneously acquired with precision comparable to, and possibly exceeding, conventional cardiac MRI with SSFP and 2D phase-contrast. Perhaps even more importantly, the parallel-imaging compressed-sensing 4D phase-contrast acquisition could be performed in under 10 minutes, on average, which means that in the future, we may be able to minimize the risk of cardiac anesthesia even further in our pediatric cardiac patients.

Dr. Hsiao studied biology, computer science, and engineering at Caltech as an undergraduate and returned home for medical school at the University of California, San Diego, where he completed a PhD program in bioengineering with an emphasis in bioinformatics. After completing a year of general surgery internship at Stanford, he joined our Department as a first-year resident in 2008. Now in his third year of our Residency Program, Dr. Hsiao works primarily with Drs. Vasanawala, Chan, and Herfkens to develop practical clinical applications for 4D flow MRI.

Dr. Hsiao also recently welcomed his newborn son, Matthew, into the world.

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For his prior blog posting, please see "Awards and Honors: April 26, 2010" and "Welcome New Residents."

In the News: Dr. Heike Daldrup-Link

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Dr. Heike Daldrup-Link is quoted in a recent article "Implantable Sensor Tracks Cancer in the Body" by Ferris Jabr featured in NewScientist.com. Jabr describes the design of a capsule by scientists at MIT that is small enough to fit inside a needle and filled with magnetic nanoparticles that can noninvasively track the growth of a tumor. Proteins attached to the nanoparticles bind to proteins released by the tumor, enabling the imaging of these proteins using magnetic resonance. By scanning the capsule, physicians can determine if the tumor is growing larger or smaller.

Dr. Daldrup Link, associate professor of radiology, was intrigued by "the prospect of tumour-trackers that can be read with handheld scanners."

To access her prior blog posting, please see "New Faculty Hires and Promotions: Heike Daldrup-Link, MD"

New Chief Residents for 2011: Veronica Cox, MD, and Jonathan Williams, MD

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Congratulations to our 2 new residents, who will begin their service in July 2011: Veronica Cox, MD, and Jonathan Williams, MD.

Veronica grew up in rural Mendocino County. Prior to entering the Radiology Residency Program at Stanford, she attended the University of California, Berkeley, as an undergraduate, followed by medical school at the University of California, San Diego.

Since starting residency at Stanford, she has been an active member of the American College of Radiology (ACR) and California Radiological Society (CRS). In January of 2010, she became the president of the Resident and Fellow Section of CRS, promoting resident awareness of legislative, regulatory, and business forces affecting radiology. She has also been actively involved with the School of Medicine's Radiology Interest Group (RIG) as a "resident mentor"; participant on several resident panels for RIG functions; and workshop organizer facilitating discussions regarding applications, interviewing, and the Match.

As an incoming chief resident, Veronica is interested in 1) improving the clinical relevance of radiology as a specialty and enriching the experience of radiologists through increased dialogue with clinicians and 2) promoting radiology resident awareness and leadership in regards to contemporary imaging issues, such as radiation safety and the overutilization of imaging.

In her spare time, she enjoys soaking up as much California sun as possible, attending Stanford football games and interesting campus lectures, as well as baking comfort foods.

To read about prior chief residents, please access "New Chief Residents for 2010: Stacey Keel, MD, and Anobel Tamrazi, MD, PhD" and "Welcome to Our New Chief Residents!."

New Faculty Hires and Promotions: Parag Mallick, PhD

mallick.jpgParag Mallick, PhD, has recently joined the Department of Radiology as an assistant professor as well as member of the Canary Center at Stanford for Cancer Early Detection , Bio-X, and Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford (MIPS).

Dr. Mallick received his BS in computer science and biochemistry from Washington University in St. Louis and his PhD from the University of California, Los Angeles, in chemistry and biochemistry. He next moved to the state of Washington as a postdoctoral fellow at the Institute for Systems Biology in Seattle, where he researched clinical and quantitative mass spectrometry-based proteomics.

Prior to coming to Stanford, Dr. Mallick was as an assistant professor in the Departments of Medicine and Biomedical Engineering at the University of Southern California (USC) and the director of clinical proteomics at the Center for Applied Molecular Medicine (CAMM), where he developed a systems biology and quantitative biology research group. He was also a visiting scientist at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center. At Stanford, his research focus is on systems biology approaches for the discovery of serologic and imaging biomarkers for cancer early detection in lung, pancreatic, prostate cancers, and lymphoma.

Included among his hobbies are juggling (with the Los Angeles Troupes, Cirque Berzerk, and The MUMs) as well as magic, which he practices as a member of The Magic Castle in Hollywood.

To read more about Dr. Mallick, please access his profile on the Stanford Medical School website at http://med.stanford.edu/profiles/Parag_Mallick/ .

Announcements: Stanford Center for Cancer Systems Biology (CCSB) March Seminar Series

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For more information, please contact Anita Samantaray, MPH, CCSB Program Manager, at 650.725.6070.

Congratulations February WOW Card Winners!

Radiology Hospital employees regularly acknowledge each other’s hard work by posting their positive comments on WOW cards. Sometimes these cards are also completed by patients who are impressed with the care they have received from Radiology staff. Employees receiving a “WOW” card are not only publicly recognized, but are also given a free coffee card. The following list contains February's WOW card winners*:

Abegail Alhambra
Susanne Campanille
Brooke Cibik
Mark Coleman
Kim Duong
JoAnn Esselborn
Carol Estades
Shirley Furich
Orwson Garcia
Wendy Gauquier
Elena Korabelnikova
Sherri Lee
Beth McCallum
Dottie Scharff

Congratulations!


*Thanks to Noemy Quiroz for helping compile this list.

Announcements: ISIS March Seminar Series

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For more information, please contact Danae Barnes, administrative program manager.

Awards and Honors: March 9, 2011

Published research by Nirupama Deshpande, PhD, and co-authors, Ying Ren, PhD, Kira Foygel, PhD, Jarrett Rosenberg, PhD, and Juergen Willmann, MD, was recently featured in the "Science to Practice" Section of Radiology (2011;258(3):655-656). In their featured paper, “Tumor Angiogenic Marker Expression Levels during Tumor Growth: Longitudinal Assessment with Molecularly Targeted Microbubbles and US Imaging," Dr. Deshpande and her coauthors from the Translational Molecular Imaging Laboratory (TMIL) describe their research using targeted microbubbles that can track the molecular profiles of tumor angiogenic marker expressions in murine models of breast, ovarian, and prostate cancer in vivo.

According to the March 2011 "Science to Practice" section of Radiology, their research promises to aid the development of imaging methods that "could help select patients for more individualized angiogenic inhibitor therapy on the basis of tumor vessel molecular expression patterns," which is greatly desired. To read more, please access "Science to Practice: Angiogenic Marker Expression During Tumor Growth—Can Targeted US Microbubbles Help Monitor Molecular Changes in the Microvasculature?" by Peter L. Choyke, MD, from the molecular imaging program at the NIH.

Dr. Robert Herfkens Receives Special SHC Award

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Before a standing ovation at the Stanford Hospital and Clinics (SHC) monthly Radiology Department meeting on Thursday, March 3rd, Dr. Robert Herfkens was presented with a surprise award in recognition of his special talents as a leader by Claudia Cooper, clinical director of imaging services ; Rick Kong, director of informatics;

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Teresa Nelson, MRI supervisor; Carol Estades, administrative assistant ; Linda Rodriguez, manager of radiology informatics; Deborah Williams, radiology clerical supervisor of the imaging service center; and Tori Shannon, operations manager for CyberKnife technology.

Radiology staff thanked Dr. Herfkens for his untiring commitment to the Department as well as his genuine compassion and caring attitude towards each patient and staff member: “He is a pleasure to work with and pushes each staff member to go beyond what they think they can achieve; he always has the best interest of . . .

. . . each of us at heart. This award recognizes how special he is, and how much we admire and respect him.”

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Dr. Herfkens is currently the associate chair for clinical technology in the Department of Radiology; the director of MRI; and the director of Destination Digital (PACS–digital imaging transfer).

Awards and Honors: March 8, 2011

Iagaru_09_100.pngAndrei Iagaru, MD, has received the Best Essay Award at the 2011 Mid-Winter Society of Nuclear Medicine/American College of Nuclear Medicine (SNM/ACNM) Annual Meeting for his abstract "Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma in First Complete Remission: Is There a Role for 18F FDG PET/CT Surveillance."

Dr. Iagaru was recruited as assistant professor of radiology in September 2010, with a subspecialty in nuclear medicine. He completed medical school at Carol Davila University of Medicine, Bucharest, Romania, and an internship at Drexel University College of Medicine, Graduate Hospital, in the Department of Medicine. He began his residency at the University of Southern California (USC) Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles, in the Division of Nuclear Medicine, where he was the chief resident. Dr. Iagaru finished his residency and completed a PET/CT fellowship at Stanford University's School of Medicine in the Division of Nuclear Medicine. His research interests include whole-body MRI and PET/CT for early cancer detection; clinical translation of novel PET radiopharmaceuticals; radioimmunotherapy; optical imaging of breast cancer; as well as PET/CT imaging for thyroid, breast, cervical and ovarian cancers, melanoma, lymphoma, and sarcomas.

Over the past 3 years as an instructor in nuclear medicine, Dr. Iagaru has received several awards including the Society of Nuclear Medicine (SNM) 2009 Image of the Year Award; SNM/American College of Nuclear Medicine (ACNM) Mid-Winter Conference 2010 Best Essay Award; 2009 Western Regional SNM Scientist Award; and a Stanford Cancer Center 2009 Developmental Cancer Research Award in Translational Science . With his interests, background, and training, Dr. Iagaru will find many opportunities for collaboration, teaching, and introducing his successful research into the clinical practice of nuclear medicine.

Please see his other award postings: "Awards and Honors I: June 29, 2010"; "Awards and Honors: March 15, 2010"; "Awards and Honors: July 17, 2009"; "Awards and Honors: May 26, 2009"; and "Awards and Honors I: July 15, 2008".

Awards and Honors: March 7, 2011

sun_conroy.jpgConroy Sun, PhD, a postdoctoral fellow in the Image Guided Intervention Laboratory, has received a Breast Cancer Research Program (BCRP) Fellowship Award from the Department of Defense (DOD) to support the development and research of X-ray luminescent nanophosphors for use in breast tumor detection and treatment.

Dr. Sun received his joint PhD degree in materials science & engineering as well as nanotechnology from the University of Washington (UW) in 2008. During his graduate studies in Professor Miqin Zhang’s biomaterials laboratory, Dr. Sun investigated the synthesis and surface modification of superparamagnetic nanoparticles for applications in cancer diagnosis and treatment. After working as a senior fellow in the UW Department of Neurological Surgery under Dr. Richard Ellenbogen, Dr. Sun joined the laboratory of Dr. Lei Xing in 2009 to research targeted X-ray/optical nanoparticles for molecular imaging. Under the co-mentorship of Drs. Xing and Sanjiv Sam Gambhir, Dr. Sun is currently developing a multifunctional radioluminescent nanoparticle platform to enhance radiotherapy of breast tumors, which is supported by the BCRP postdoctoral fellowship.

In addition to the BCRP Award, some of Dr. Sun’s other achievements include a 2010 World Molecular Imaging Conference (WMIC) Travel Award and the publication of over 18 articles.

Technologist of the Quarter: Pepa (Maria Jose) Arriaza Ibanez

Ibanez_Pepa Arriaza.jpgPepa (Maria Jose) Arriaza Ibanez, (ARRT)(CRT)(CT), has received the Technologist of the Quarter Award from the staff of our Diagnostic Radiology Section for October-December 2010. Ms. Ibanez received the award in recognition of her outstanding work ethic and excellence in patient care. A great team player, she has received several commendations from her co-workers and supervisors. Ms. Ibanez is the third technologist in Diagnostic Radiology to receive this award, which was determined by the vote of her peers and includes lunch with the director of the Department.

Originally from Granada, Spain, Ms. Ibanez moved to Berkeley in 1997, where she met her husband, Jeff. Moving across the Bay to San Francisco, she attended City College of San Francisco, earning her associate of science degree in diagnostic medical imaging and graduating with honors. Her certifications include ARRT, CRT, CT, and fluoroscopy; venipuncture; CSRT; and the American Safety and Health Institute CPR.

In January of 2007, Ms. Ibanez joined our Radiology Department at Stanford Hospital & Clinics, where she works in diagnostic radiology and CT on the weekends: "It's perfect because I get to spend five days at home with my family: my husband and my son, Gael, who is two-and-a-half years old. I'm currently pregnant, and, at the end of June, a little girl will be part of our family. I love my job, and I love my family; I love being a mother, and I also love outdoor activities as well as reading, swimming, food, good wine, and good people."

New Staff Hires and Promotions: Rhea Liang

Liang_150.jpgRhea Liang has joined the Stanford Radiology 3D and Quantitative Imaging Lab as an MR imaging technologist. Ms. Liang has been working in MRI for over 20 years and has a BS in radiology technology. Prior to joining our Department, she served as the MRI lead technologist at Palo Alto Medical Foundation (PAMF) Camino Division for over 9 years.

Before coming to the United States, Ms. Liang was a medical illustrator in Shanghai, China: "I love 3d imaging technology because it makes me feel that I am resuming my medical illustration work."

In the News: Patrick Barnes, MD

Barnes1a_100.jpgPediatric Radiologist Patrick Barnes, MD, was recently featured in the New York Times article "Shaken-Baby Syndrome Faces New Questions in Court.” A member of the child-abuse-protection team at Stanford, Dr. Barnes was asked to review CT scans by defense attorneys in a child abuse case because of his expertise in shaken-baby syndrome. He has recently published on the topic in "Imaging of Nonaccidental Injury and the Mimics: Issues and Controversies in the Era of Evidence-Based Medicine" (Radiol Clin N Am 49 (2011) 205–229) (ImagingofNonaccidentalInjuryandtheMimics.pdf).

In the New York Times article, Dr. Barnes discusses the importance of considering predisposing or complicating medical conditions that can mimic the symptoms of and damage caused by shaken-baby syndrome. To read the full article, please access http://www.nytimes.com/2011/02/06/magazine/06baby-t.html?_r=1.

Dr. Barnes received his medical degree from the University of Oklahoma College of Medicine, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, where he was also a resident. After completing his residency, he became a fellow in pediatric neuroradiology and cardiovascular radiology at Children's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, in Boston, Massachusetts.

Before coming to Stanford in 2000, he was an associate professor of radiology at Harvard Medical School and director of neuroradiology and MRI at the Boston Children's Hospital. At Stanford, he has been the section chief of pediatric neuroradiology and the medical director, MRI/CT, at Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital since 2002. He was chosen as the Senior Faculty of the Year for 2002-2003, 2004-2005, and 2005-2006 for his outstanding contributions to resident education, compassionate patient care, and research.

Dr. Barnes has provided outstanding clinical, educational, and administrative leadership for the Neuroradiology and Pediatric Radiology Programs in the Department of Radiology, and he continues to help build the Developmental Neuroscience Program in the Department and at Lucile Packard Children's Hospital.

To view his prior blog posting, please access New Faculty Hires and Promotions: October 8, 2007.

Announcements: ISIS February Seminar Series

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For more information, please contact Danae Barnes, administrative program manager.

Awards and Honors: February 15, 2011

Balchandani_150.jpgPriti Balchandani, PhD, postdoctoral scholar in the Radiological Sciences Laboratory (RSL), is the recipient of a K99/R00 NIH Pathway to Independence Award from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. Her grant is entitled "High Resolution Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Spectroscopy of Epilepsy at 7T." The K99/R00 award provides funding for 5 years to assist postdoctoral investigators in transitioning to a stable independent research position as faculty.

Dr. Balchandani's research is focused on novel RF pulse and pulse sequence design for human MR imaging and spectroscopy. She is particularly interested in harnessing the power of high-field MR magnets to visualize the brain in unprecedented detail. Her work on overcoming some of the main limitations of operating at high magnetic fields has resulted in several first authored publications as well as patent applications and selection as a finalist for the International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine (ISMRM) 2008 Young Investigator Award. She was also named a Junior Fellow of the ISMRM, an honor awarded to young researchers of outstanding quality and promise, with significant potential for helping the Society achieve its mission. Dr. Balchandani received her BS in computer engineering at the University of Waterloo and her PhD in electrical engineering at Stanford University.

Please access her prior blog postings at "Awards and Honors: March 18, 2010" and "Awards and Honors: July 3, 2008."

Stanford IR Earns Multiple SIR Honors

The Stanford Interventional Radiology Section (Chief, Lawrence "Rusty" Hofmann, MD, associate professor of radiology) has received the following honors from the 2011 Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR):

Dr. Keith Chan, 2011 Constantine Medical Student Award
Dr. Radhika Dave, Resident-in-Training Travel Scholarship
Dr. Christine Ghatan, Resident-in-Training Travel Scholarship
Dr. Will Kuo, 2011 Gary Becker Young Investigator Award
Dr. Paul Laeseke, Resident-in-Training Travel Scholarship
Dr. Dan Sze, Featured Abstract (top 5% of abstracts)

In addition, Stanford IR members will be presenting 31 presentations, 16 of which are abstracts, at the 2011 Annual SIR meeting in Chicago.

Awards and Honors: February 14, 2011

dave_radhika_150.jpgRadhika Dave, MD, is the recipient of a 2011 Resident-In-Training Travel Scholarship by the Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR). Rad is a first-year Stanford Radiology resident.

Growing up outside of Chicago, Rad attended Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology where she received a degree in chemical engineering and minored in biomedical engineering and Spanish. Before attending medical school at Indiana University School of Medicine, she worked as an engineering intern at Dow Chemical and GE Plastics. Rad was happy to move to California to complete a transitional internship in San Diego, before making her way to Stanford.

She enjoys traveling, running, scuba diving, hiking, dancing, and exploring the Bay area.

To view her prior blog posting, please access "Our New Residents for 2010!"

New Staff Hires and Promotions: Charles Stanley, ASRT

Stanley_150.jpgCharles Stanley, ASRT, has joined Stanford Radiology as the manager of the 3D and Quantitative Imaging Lab (the 3DQ Lab). Mr. Stanley has over 25 years of experience in radiologic technology, with advanced certifications in MRI (ARRT), CT (ARRT), and radiology administration (AHRA).

Prior to joining our Department, he served as the imaging manager for the University of Virginia Health System for 10 years where he managed the CT, MRI, and noninvasive cardiovascular imaging (NCVI) services as well as the Advanced Visualization Lab. While at the University of Virginia, Mr. Stanley served on numerous RFP committees regarding equipment and service purchases as well as developed and maintained a large 3D imaging lab utilizing various types of post processing systems. His management expertise also extends to the imaging industry, where he was the operations manager for InSight Health Corporation and the director of imaging services at Upstate Carolina Medical Center.

In addition, Mr. Stanley has extensive community service and consulting experience. Some of his contributions include serving as an associated sciences board member of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA); an executive board member of the Section for Magnetic Resonance Technologists; and a medical, scientific, and technical advisory board member at Institute for Magnetic Resonance Safety, Education, and Research.

Awards and Honors: February 9, 2011

Faruque_150.jpg Jessica Faruque, MS, has been a awarded a research grant by the Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) for her research project, "Developing a Scalable Similarity Reference Standard for a Content-Based Image Retrieval (CBIR) System." Along with her co-mentors, Sandy Napel, PhD, and Daniel Rubin, MD, MS, Ms. Faruque will be developing a gold standard for perceptual visual similarity in liver CT lesions in content-based image retrieval for medical decision support. In her project, she will define visual attributes of images that enable assessment of similarity, and she will conduct and validate experiments to develop similarity gold standards using a variety of approaches. She will also create a publicly available image database with corresponding gold standards for the research community.

Ms. Faruque is currently a PhD candidate in the Stanford Department of Electrical Engineering, where she also received her MS. She completed her BS from California Polytechnic State University in San Luis Obispo, where she was a double major in math and electrical engineering.

Funded by a Bio-X Grant and an NIH National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS) Training Grant in Biomedical Computation, Ms. Faruque has conducted research in medical imaging, with a focus on observer studies of medical images with perceptual data, content-based image retrieval systems, and machine learning techniques to aid medical applications/diagnosis. Ultimately, she plans to pursue a research career in imaging and informatics.

Outside of research, she enjoys painting, photography, and rock climbing.

Announcements: Stanford Center for Cancer Systems Biology (CCSB) Annual Symposium "Systems Biology of Cancer"


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Event Parking: Galvez Field Parking Lot. Breakfast and lunch will be provided.
Questions? Please contact Anita Samantaray, MPH, CCSB Program Manager, at 650.725.6070.

From 3D to 3DQ: Renaming the Stanford Radiology 3D Imaging Lab to Recognize the Importance of Quantitative Imaging

By Sandy Napel, PhD

The Stanford Radiology 3D Imaging Lab (3D Lab), currently co-directed by Drs. Sandy Napel and Brooke Jeffrey, Jr., managed by Charles Stanley, and staffed by 8 technologists and 3 support staff, was established in 1996 with the goal of developing and translating innovative techniques into clinical practice for the efficient display and analysis of medical imaging data. This was motivated by a paradigm shift from cross-sectional to true volumetric imaging in several radiological imaging modalities, especially CT and MR.

From the outset, the Lab pursued 3 parallel missions. (1) In its clinical mission to deliver valid, clinically-relevant visualizations and quantitative analyses of radiological imaging data for Stanford’s patients, the Lab currently processes about 1,000 imaging studies per month. (2) In its educational mission, the Lab has trained of hundreds of physicians and technologists internationally in the latest developments in 3D visualization and quantitation. (3) In its research mission, Lab members have generated hundreds of research articles, patented algorithms, and new applications of imaging data, including virtual endoscopy, CT angiography, and volumetric cardiac imaging.

Today, in recognition of a new paradigm shift, we are renaming the Lab the “Stanford Radiology 3D and Quantitative Imaging Lab (the 3DQ Lab).” The old notion of . . .

“images as pictures” for subjective interpretation is rapidly changing to include the notion of “images as a source of quantitative information” that can potentially better inform treatment options, predict treatment response and likely outcomes, as well as allow high-throughput discovery of relationships between image features, clinical data, and molecular features of disease. This renaming recognizes the quantitative imaging efforts that the Lab has pioneered during its first 15 years, which include the development and translation of approaches to measuring anatomical structures from imaging data that have benefitted tens of thousands of patients. The excellence of our technologists, software platforms, algorithms, and research scientists ensures the success of our growing pursuits, which include expanding deeply into the quantitative imaging domain.

Because the present terrain of quantitative imaging extends far beyond structural measurements from images, Dr. Daniel L. Rubin, MD, MS, has joined our Lab to lead our research and translational efforts in quantitative imaging. Dr. Rubin holds an NIH grant within the National Cancer Institute’s (NCl) Quantitative Imaging Network, and he has received national recognition for his efforts and achievements as a thought leader in the development of technologies that extract quantitative information from images and radiology reports to guide decision making. We expect that Dr. Rubin will help grow the clinical side of the 3DQ Lab into a core facility for clinical trials involving quantitative imaging of disease burden and treatment response. On the research side of the 3DQ Lab, his leadership will help develop new methods for extracting and using quantitative information from radiological images for research and clinical care. Watch for our new website, http://3dqlab.org, launching soon.

Awards and Honors: February 4, 2011

Chan_keith_150.jpgKeith Chan, MS, has been awarded the 2011 Dr. Constantin Cope Medical Student Award from the Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR). Mentored by Lawrence "Rusty" Hofmann, MD, associate professor and chief of interventional radiology, Keith received this award in recognition of his abstract entitled "Common Iliac Vein Stenosis: A Risk Factor for Oral Contraceptive-Induced Deep Vein Thrombosis" which will be presented this March.

After receiving his BS in biomedical engineering from Columbia University, Keith earned his MS in mechanical engineering from Stanford University, where he is currently a fourth-year medical student in the School of Medicine. For the past 3 years, Keith has collaborated with the Interventional Radiology Section to investigate the association between vascular anatomy and venous thromboembolism. His prior experiences in the medical device industry include the development of the world’s first needle-free continuous blood glucose monitoring system and an implantable artificial heart. In addition, he has published his research in 7 articles and abstracts and has attained 6 patents. His future goal is to improve health outcomes and patient quality-of-life with innovative and cost-effective use of technology.

Awards and Honors: February 2, 2011

Christine Ghatan, MD, has been awarded a 2011 Resident-in-Training Travel Scholarship by the Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR). Dr. Ghatan is currently a radiology resident at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, in the Department of Imaging, where she also completed an internship in the Department of Surgery.

While she was a medical student at the Keck School of Medicine, Dr. Ghatan completed a rotation in the Stanford Interventional Radiology Section. Mentored by Nishita Kothary, MD, assistant professor of radiology (diagnostic), she and Dr. Kothary produced a poster for presentation at the 2010 Society of Interventional Radiology Annual Meeting: "Making the Case for Early Medical Student Education in Interventional Radiology: A Survey of Second-Year Students in a U.S. Institution." In addition, Dr. Ghatan has presented 3 other posters and published 4 articles based on her research. Her interests outside of residency include beach volleyball, sewing, and architectural conservancy in Los Angeles.

Awards and Honors: February 1, 2011

laeseke_paul.jpgPaul Laeseke, MD, PhD, has been awarded a Resident-in-Training Travel Scholarship by the Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR). Dr. Laeseke is currently a first-year resident in our Department, where his research interests include thermal tissue ablation; medical imaging; and image-guided cancer therapies.

Prior to starting his residency in diagnostic radiology, Dr. Laeseke completed an internship in general surgery at the Maine Medical Center in Portland, ME. Graduating from the University of Wisconsin Medical Scientist MD/PhD Training Program, he was awarded the Dr. B.K. and Tomina Lovell Scholarship from the Department of Radiology, which recognizes worthy and deserving students entering the field of radiology. As a doctoral student in biomedical engineering, Dr. Laeseke developed a strong interest in targeted cancer therapies, particularly thermal tumor ablation, and his research has focused on devices and techniques for multiple-applicator thermal ablation.

Dr. Laeseke has authored numerous manuscripts, book chapters, patents, and abstracts on his research, and he has presented at multiple international meetings. As a result, his work has received several awards and honors, including the Top Abstract award at the 2008 World Congress of Interventional Oncology. In addition, Dr. Laeseke is a founding member of NeuWave Medical, a biotechnology company that specializes in minimally invasive energy-based medical devices.

Other personal achievements include winning the 2006 Lakefront Marathon, Milwaukee, WI, and competing in the 2005 Ironman Triathlon World Championship in Kailua-Kona, HI.

In the News: Brian Rutt, PhD

Rutt_150.gifBrian Rutt, PhD, professor of radiology and director of the High-Field Imaging Program, has been awarded a major grant for designing a new method for labeling cells and tracking them down to the single cell level with MRI. Awarded by the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM), Dr. Rutt’s grant was 1 of only 3 imaging awards.

According to a recent press release, "CIRM Approves Funding $32 Million to Remove Hurdles to New Stem Cell Therapies," the CIRM awarded the 19 stem cell grants to "create new tools and technologies that overcome barriers to moving stem cell research into clinical trials," which promises to "accelerate the development of stem cell-based therapies for people of the world." Dr. Rutt's research was singled out for specific mention in the press release.

Before coming to Stanford, Dr. Rutt was a scientist at the Robarts Research Institute and professor of diagnostic radiology and nuclear medicine at the University of Western Ontario, where he has held the Barnett-Ivey Endowed Research Chair, Heart and Stroke Foundation since 1997. At Robarts, he co-founded the Cellular and Molecular Imaging Program; served as the scientific director for the 1.5T and 3T research MRI facilities; and established a hardware engineering core facility. Under his direction, the first 1.5T MRI scanner and one of the first 3T MRI systems in Canada were installed in London, Ontario.

After completing his BASc in engineering science at the University of Toronto, Ontario, Dr. Rutt received his master's degree in electrical engineering from Stanford, returning to Canada to attain his PhD in medical biophysics at the University of Western Ontario. Subsequently, he completed a postdoc at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF). His research interests include MRI technology development and the application of advanced MRI techniques for studying the cardiovascular system, brain, and cancer.

Please access his prior blog articles: "Awards and Honors III: February 13, 2009" and "Meet Brian Rutt, PhD, Professor of Radiology and Director of Our High-Field MRI Program at Stanford Radiology."

Stanford Symposium Advances Pediatric Cardiac Imaging

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By Julie Ruiz-Wibbelsmann, PhD

Imaging our smallest patients requires specialized techniques, safety measures, and knowledge of pediatric anatomy and disease. From January 18th-23rd, the Advanced Pediatric Cardiac Imaging Symposium at Lucile Packard Children's Hospital (LPCH) provided pediatric cardiovascular imagers with the tools to fulfill these specific imaging needs. The Symposium was presented by the Society for Pediatric Radiology (SPR), the Children's Heart Center at LPCH, and Stanford Radiology.

Divided into two parts, the Symposium provided . . .

the most comprehensive educational opportunities in pediatric cardiovascular imaging. The 8th SPR Symposium on Pediatric Cardiovascular MRI/Basic Course comprised the first half of the Symposium and was held from January 18-21 for 18 individually selected physicians. Each course participant received hands-on training by 16 faculty leaders from Stanford as well as from other world-renowned children's cardiac MRI hospitals. Course topics included the optimization of patient safety and image quality; the application of MR scanning and post-processing techniques; and the interpretation of pediatric cardiovascular MR and the evaluation of common pathologic conditions and difficult cases. Stanford 3D Lab technologists Marc Sofilos, RT (interim) 3D Lab manager, and Linda Horst, RT (MR) (interim) 3D Lab manager, taught post-processing techniques for accurate data capture and 3D reconstruction.

The 6th Advanced Pediatric Cardiovascular Imaging Course comprised the second half of the Symposium and was held from January 21-23. Taught by 32 international experts in pediatric cardiac imaging, this course included lectures on the current best practice indications and integrated imaging techniques for pediatric cardiovascular disease evaluation and treatment; advanced CMR techniques for accurate assessment of myocardial function and ventricular flow; and the incorporation of CT imaging for the pediatric patient and post-processing tools to enhance diagnostic detail.

Course directors were Frandics Chan, MD, PhD, associate professor of Radiology (Stanford Cardiovascular Imaging Section); Taylor Chung, MD, associate director of cardiovascular and body imaging (Department of Diagnostic Imaging at Children's Hospital & Research Center Oakland); and Shi-Joon Yoo, MD, PhD, cardiac radiologist, head of the Division of Cardiac Imaging Hospital for Sick Kids, and professor of medical imaging and paediatrics at the University of Toronto.

The course directors were Richard Barth, MD, radiologist-in-chief at Lucile Packard Children's Hospital at Stanford, professor and associate chair of radiology; Paul S. Babyn, MD, radiologist-in-chief at the Hospital for Sick Children, associate professor of the Department of Medical Imaging at the University of Toronto; and Ronald Cohen, MD, director of the Department of Diagnostic Imaging at Children's Hospital & Research Center in Oakland. For a complete list of speakers and Symposium course description, please access http://radiologycme.stanford.edu/2011peds.

To read press coverage of our Symposium, please see
"Packard Children’s Hospital to Host Advanced Pediatric Cardiac Imaging Symposium
Jan 18-23, Presented in Conjunction with the Society for Pediatric Radiology; Attendees from Asia, Europe, North America
" and "Packard Children's Hospital to Host Advanced Pediatric Cardiac Imaging Symposium Jan 18-23, Presented in Conjunction with the Society for Pediatric Radiology; Attendees from Asia, Europe, North America."

Awards and Honors: January 31, 2011

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Sandra Rodriguez, MS R(RT)(MR), MR research technologist, has earned her master's degree in Health Administration from the University of Phoenix. At the Lucas Center, Ms. Rodriguez helps users set-up for their studies and facilitates their scans, providing support whenever necessary. She also does quality assurance on our three scanners to ensure that they are running smoothly. In her free time, Ms. Rodriguez enjoys cardio kickboxing; reading; and trying to keep up with a teenage girl (her daughter). Ms. Rodriguez earned her Bachelor of Science in Health Administration (BSHA) in an online program through the University of Phoenix in September of 2008.

For her prior awards listings, please access "Awards and Honors: December 15, 2010"; "Awards and Honors: April 19, 2010"; "Awards and Honors: February 19, 2010"; "Awards and Honors: August 11, 2009"; and "Awards and Honors: April 9, 2008."

In the News: Dr. Gary M. Glazer's Research on the Invisible Radiologist

HealthImaging.com recently featured an article by Stanford Radiology Chair Gary M. Glazer, MD, in "Radiology: Personalized Service Can Combat Commoditization," which details his recently published research on patient-centered radiology: "The Invisible Radiologist" (Radiology 2011; 258(1): 18-22).

Because radiologists have limited contact with patients, radiologists are physically invisible to them, and their role as physicians also remains hidden or invisible to most patients. Dr. Glazer published "The Invisible Radiologist" to highlight the importance of a visible radiologist to patient care. Other articles on patient-centered radiology by Dr. Glazer include "The State of Radiology in 2006: Very High Spatial Resolution but No Visibility" in Radiology (2006; 241:11–16) and "Creating a Patient-Centered Imaging Service: Determining What Patients Want" in the American Journal of Roentgenology in press, March 2011.


Announcements: ISIS January Seminar Series

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For more information, please contact Danae Barnes, administrative program manager.

Announcements: Stanford Center for Cancer Systems Biology January Seminar Series


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For more information, please contact Anita Samantaray, MPH, CCSB Program Manager, at 650.725.6070.

Awards and Honors: January 10, 2011

c panje_150.jpgCedric Panje, 5th-year medical student at Lübeck University, Germany, was awarded the 2010 RSNA Travel Award for Young Investigators in Molecular Imaging for his paper entitled, “Influence of Microbubble and DNA Doses on in Vivo Ultrasound-mediated Gene Delivery with Cationic vs Neutral Microbubbles” (M.A. Pysz, D.S. Wang, Y. Ren, M. Schneider, and J.K. Willmann).

While at Stanford as a visiting researcher, Cedric’s work focused on in vivo application of therapeutic ultrasound and microbubbles for gene delivery, which was supported by a fellowship from the German National Academic Foundation. He pursued his research under the guidance of Dr. Juergen Willmann in the Translational Molecular Imaging Lab (TMIL) during a 1-year research sabbatical from Lübeck University in Germany where he is currently finishing the 5th year of his 6-year medical school program.

When he is not working, Cedric enjoys hiking, the opera from Mozart to Wagner, and classic literature. After finishing his studies, Cedric plans to pursue a career in academic radiology.

Awards and Honors: January 4, 2011

Kuo_mosrrecent150.jpgWilliam Kuo, MD, assistant professor of vascular and interventional radiology and CV/interventional fellowship director, has been awarded the 2011 Dr. Gary J. Becker Young Investigator Award by the Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR). Bestowed in honor of the founding editor of the Journal of Vascular and Interventional Radiology (JVIR), this award "promotes excellence in academic research for members early in their careers" and recognizes "the importance of the young investigator in developing the interventional solutions for the future" (from http://www.sirfoundation.org/grants-awards/becker_award.shtml). Dr. Kuo received this award for authoring the "most outstanding clinical science research paper" submitted for consideration.

Dr. Kuo received a BS degree with honors from Duke University and he earned an MD degree from Wake Forest University School of Medicine with distinction in radiology, winning the Meschan Award for Radiology Excellence. After completing his surgical internship at Virginia Mason Hospital in Seattle, WA, he trained in a combined interventional and diagnostic radiology residency program at the University of Rochester Medical Center where he served as chief resident and became one of the first in the nation to complete the Clinical Pathway in Vascular and Interventional Radiology. Following residency, Dr. Kuo received advanced endovascular training by completing his fellowship at Stanford University Medical Center.

Dr. Kuo is an international authority on catheter-directed treatment of acute PE and complex IVC filter retrieval. He is currently principal investigator of the Stanford FILTER (Filter Immediate and LongTerm Evaluation after placement and Retrieval) registry and the multicenter PERFECT (Pulmonary Embolism Response to Fragmentation, Embolectomy, and Catheter Thrombolysis) registry. As a nationally recognized expert, he has testified before the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and he has authored multiple seminal papers, which have led to improvements in the treatment of venous thromboembolism and new therapies for embedded IVC filters. Dr. Kuo has pioneered the use of endovascular laser technology for complex filter retrieval, as described in his current paper “Photothermal Ablation With the Excimer Laser Sheath Technique for Embedded IVC Filter Removal: Initial Results from a Prospective Study.” His team at Stanford is the first in the world to successfully use this innovative procedure in humans. Dr. Kuo has applied his expertise to treat many patients from around the country, and he has established the Stanford IVC Filter Clinic as a national and international referral center for the management of filter-related complications.

To read his prior blog articles, please access "In the News: Drs. Kothary, Kuo, and Hofmann"; "In the News: William Kuo, MD"; "Dr. William Kuo and Colleagues Reveal Lifesaving Treatment for Pulmonary Embolism"; "Dr. Kuo Honors His Patients in the LiveStrong Challenge"; "Awards and Honors: April 3, 2008"; and "New Faculty Hires and Promotions: January 2006-February 2007."


Awards and Honors: January 3, 2011

RubinDaniel2_150.jpgDaniel Rubin, MD, MS, assistant professor of radiology and a member of both Bio-X and the Stanford Cancer Center, has received the Radiological Society of North America's (RSNA) Cum Laude Award for his educational exhibit: “Natural Language Processing in Radiology."

One of the top three educational exhibits in informatics, “Natural Language Processing in Radiology" was motivated by the massive amount of text that confronts radiologists, both in terms of radiology reports and radiology literature. Dr. Rubin's project reviews the key methodologies in natural language processing and demonstrates how computational methods can extract key information from radiology text sources and structure this information in ways that will enable radiologists to improve their practice and help researchers to make new discoveries.

Dr. Rubin's background is in clinical and investigational radiology as a radiologist and as a researcher. He attended Stanford Medical School and received his master's degree in biomedical informatics. He also completed his residency as well as his body and research fellowships at Stanford University. Dr. Rubin was recruited to Stanford Radiology to participate in building a new section in the information sciences called ISIS (Information Science in Imaging at Stanford). His academic focus is on the intersection of biomedical informatics and imaging science where he is developing computational methods and applications to access and integrate diverse clinical and imaging data; to extract information and meaning from images; to enable data mining and the discovery of image biomarkers; and to translate these methods into practice by creating computer applications that will improve diagnostic accuracy and clinical effectiveness. Dr. Rubin is also chair of the RadLex Steering Committee of the RSNA, an effort to create a standard terminology for all of radiology; chair of the Informatics Committee of the American College of Radiology Imaging Network (ACRIN) and co-chair of the Medical Imaging Systems Working Group of the American Medical Informatics Association.

To read prior articles regarding Dr. Rubin's accomplishments, please access "Awards and Honors: December 1, 2010"; Awards and Honors: October 28, 2010"; "Dr. Rubin Receives NCI Grant for Quantitative Imaging Research"; "New Faculty Hires and Promotions: December 17, 2008" and "Awards and Honors: December 15, 2008."


Awards and Honors: December 15, 2010

Sandra Rodriguez_2009.jpgSandra Rodriguez, MS R(RT)(MR), MR research technologist, has been awarded the Professional Advancement Scholarship, which was funded by Toshiba in memory of Judith Behrens, who passed away on August 25, 2009. Ms. Behrens worked as an MRI applications specialist for General Electric, Hitachi, Siemens, and Toshiba Medical Systems.

The Professional Advancement Scholarship "assists radiologic technologists completing a certificate or undergraduate or graduate degree in the radiologic sciences." To read more about Ms. Rodriguez's award, please access the American Society of Radiologic Technologists (ASRT) website where you can view her photo; read the press release regarding her award, "ASRT Foundation Awards $15,000 in Scholarship Funds to Radiologic Technologists Earning Degrees"; and view the 2010 list of award winners.

Ms. Rodriguez earned her Bachelor of Science in Health Administration (BSHA) in an online program through the University of Phoenix in September of 2008. She has completed the Master's Program in Health Administration and received her degree in November 2010. As an MRI technologist at the Lucas Center, Ms. Rodriguez helps users set-up for their studies and facilitates their scans, providing support whenever necessary. She also does quality assurance on our three scanners and makes sure they are running smoothly. In her free time, Ms. Rodriguez enjoys cardio kickboxing; reading; and trying to keep up with a teenage girl (her daughter).

For her prior awards listings, please access "Awards and Honors: April 19, 2010"; Awards and Honors: February 19, 2010; Awards and Honors: August 11, 2009; and Awards and Honors: April 9, 2008.

Awards and Honors: December 1, 2010

RubinDaniel2_150.jpgDaniel Rubin, MD, MS, assistant professor of radiology and a member of both Bio-X and the Stanford Cancer Center, was awarded the Distinguished Paper Award from the American College of Medical Informatics (AMIA). His article, “Natural Language Processing for Lines and Devices in Portable Chest X-Rays,” was 1 of the 5 best papers selected to receive this Award from among those presented at the AMIA 2010 meeting.

Dr. Rubin’s paper describes methods and results for developing natural language processing methods to extract information from dictated radiology reports to deduce the presence of medical devices and their dwell time in patients. The goal of this work is to enable large-scale data mining of radiology reports to catalyze epidemiological and comparative effectiveness research, such as understanding how occurrence and length of infections relate to presence and dwell time of medical devices. The motivation of Dr. Rubin's work on natural language processing of radiology texts is to “structure the unstructured radiology information” contained in narrative text to enable data mining and computer-based inference on vast archives of radiology data. The vision of his laboratory is to exploit massive collections of images and reports collected during routine clinical care to enable new radiology discoveries and translational applications.

Dr. Rubin's background is in clinical and investigational radiology as a radiologist and as a researcher. He attended Stanford Medical School and received his master's degree in biomedical informatics. He also completed his residency as well as his body and research fellowships at Stanford University. Dr. Rubin was recruited to Stanford Radiology to participate in building a new section in the information sciences called ISIS (Information Science in Imaging at Stanford). His academic focus is on the intersection of biomedical informatics and imaging science where he is developing computational methods and applications to access and integrate diverse clinical and imaging data; to extract information and meaning from images; to enable data mining and the discovery of image biomarkers; and to translate these methods into practice by creating computer applications that will improve diagnostic accuracy and clinical effectiveness. Dr. Rubin is also chair of the RadLex Steering Committee of the RSNA, an effort to create a standard terminology for all of radiology; chair of the Informatics Committee of the American College of Radiology Imaging Network (ACRIN) and co-chair of the Medical Imaging Systems Working Group of the American Medical Informatics Association.

To read prior articles regarding Dr. Rubin's accomplishments, please access "Awards and Honors: October 28, 2010"; "Dr. Rubin Receives NCI Grant for Quantitative Imaging Research"; "New Faculty Hires and Promotions: December 17, 2008" and "Awards and Honors: December 15, 2008."


Announcements: Stanford Center for Cancer Systems Biology November Seminar Series

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For more information, please contact Anita Samantaray, MPH, CCSB Program Manager, at 650.725.6070.

New Staff Hires and Promotions: Anita Samantaray, MPH

Samantaray_Anita.jpgAnita Samantaray, MPH, recently joined our Department as the program manager of our Center for Cancer Systems Biology (CCSB).

Prior to joining our Department, she was the project manager of Family and Community Medicine in the Stanford University School of Medicine. In addition, Anita has worked at the University of California, Los Angeles, (UCLA)/Drew Schools of Medicine as manager of the Division of Nephrology and Hypertension (Internal Medicine) and as a health sciences specialist at the Palo Alto VA Hospital in the Division of Cardiology (Internal Medicine).

Anita received her master's degree in public health at Loma Linda University after earning her bachelor of science in neurobiology, physiology, & behavior from the University of California, Davis. Outside of work, she is involved with Empower Tanzania, an organization that works in partnership with Tanzanians to develop sustainable models to enhance the quality of life and resilience of rural areas through health improvements, education and economic empowerment.

Anita is a Bay Area native who enjoys being newly married, studying languages, scuba diving, and practicing transcendental meditation.

Awards and Honors: November 22, 2010

Ringertz100120.jpgHans Ringertz, MD, PhD, has received the Special Presidential Award by the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) for his "significant contributions to the field of radiology or the radiologic sciences." Dr. Ringertz will receive his award at the 2010 RSNA.

According to 2010 RSNA President Hedvig Hricak, MD, PhD, Drhc, Dr. Ringertz “is the pioneer of pediatric MR imaging, a world leader in radiation safety, and headed one of the most prestigious university radiologic departments in the world. His membership on and presidency of the Nobel committee always ensured biomedical imaging a fair review.” Dr. Ringertz describes receiving the Special Presidential Award "as unreal—it is I who should express my gratitude to American radiology for all the possibilities it has given to me" ("Special Presidential Award."). To read more about his award, please access the RSNA News: "Special Presidential Award."

Dr. Ringertz was professor and chairman of the Department of Radiology at the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm from 1984 to 2006 and is currently serving as professor emeritus. Dr. Ringertz has a long history with the Karolinska Institute where he obtained his medical degree and a doctorate in biophysics 5 years later. Early on, Dr. Ringertz held research positions at the Institute's Department of Physiology and Department of Medical Physics. In 1969, he began a residency in diagnostic radiology. Only 9 years later, he became chair of the Department of Radiology at the Sachs' Pediatric Hospital in Stockholm. He returned to the Karolinska Institute in 1984. Dr. Ringertz has also served as a visiting professor in the Department of Radiology at the Lucile Packard Children's Hospital, Stanford University Hospital. He is a member of more than 24 professional organizations and has acted as an invited lecturer or chairman at many scientific and professional meetings and workshops. He has received numerous awards, including honorary memberships in 14 radiological societies such as Honorary Fellow of the American College of Radiology (FACR); Honorary Fellow of the Royal College of Radiologists, London, England, (FRCR); and Honorary Fellow Faculty for Radiologists of the Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland (FFRRCSI). In 2003, he was chair of the Nobel Assembly at the Karolinska Institute. Dr. Ringertz serves as editor or ad hoc referee on the editorial board of a dozen medical publications worldwide. He was president of the European Association of Radiology from 1997 to 1999 and was awarded the Gold Medal of the European Congress of Radiology and the European Association of Radiology.

To view his prior blog posting, please access "Awards and Honors: February 2007."

In the News: F. Graham Sommer, MD

Sommer.jpgHigh Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) research by Dr. F. Graham Sommer and his colleagues was recently featured in the RSNA News: “HIFU Offers Promising Outcomes as Prostate Cancer Treatment.

MR-guided transurethral HIFU promises to preserve the urethra from damage by resection and ablation from sound waves. The technique developed by Dr. Sommer and his team involves using an MR-guided transurethral applicator (TA) in the urethra that emits high-intensity ultrasound in a pattern designed to ablate, or destroy, benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) tissue in the lateral portions of the prostate gland. A similar approach should also be possible using focal therapy to ablate regions of the prostate involved with prostate cancer. The color overlay of temperature allows monitoring of the procedure, so that targeted tissue may be ablated without damaging normal adjacent structures.

According to Dr. Sommer, "[o]ur technique also looks very promising for benign prostatic hyperplasia, which could be an even more important application of HIFU than as a treatment for prostate cancer" (“HIFU Offers Promising Outcomes as Prostate Cancer Treatment”).

Awards and Honors: November 19, 2010

Wu_100100.jpgJoseph Wu, MD, PhD, has received the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers, "the highest honor bestowed by the United States government on science and engineering professionals in the early stages of their independent research careers" ("Emerging Scientists Win Federal Award"). Dr. Wu was named by President Obama to receive this Award as 1 of 85 scientists who "have shown such tremendous promise so early in their careers" and who will make "discoveries that will continue to move our nation forward in the years ahead" ("President Honors Outstanding Early-Career Scientists").

Ten federal departments and agencies annually nominate the most "meritorious scientists and engineers whose early accomplishments show the greatest promise for assuring America’s preeminence in science and engineering and contributing to the awarding agencies' missions" ("President Honors Outstanding Early-Career Scientists"). Nominated by . . .

the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), Dr. Wu is 1 of 4 Stanford scientists to receive this award, which includes up to 5 years of funding to pursue innovative research. To read more, please access "Stem Cells to Hypersonic Vehicles: Four Young Scientists Win Presidential Award."

Prior to joining our faculty, Dr. Wu completed his fellowship and residency at the University of Los Angeles (UCLA) Medical Center. He received his MD from Yale University School of Medicine and his PhD from UCLA Department of Molecular Pharmacology. Dr. Wu's clinical interests include adult congenital heart disease, nuclear cardiology, and echocardiography. His basic research focus is on the biological mechanisms of adult stem cells, embryonic stem cells, and induced pluripotent stem cells. He and his team use a combination of gene profiling, tissue engineering, physiological testing, and molecular imaging technologies to better understand stem cell biology in vitro and in vivo. They are interested in monitoring stem cell survival, proliferation, and differentiation for adult stem cells, while for embryonic stem cells, they are currently studying their tumorigenicity, immunogenicity, and differentiation. Further information is available at his lab website: http://wulab.stanford.edu/.

Dr. Wu has published over 100 articles. He has also received many awards, including the Burroughs Wellcome Fund Career Award for Biomedical Scientists, the American College of Cardiology Cardiovascular Imaging Award, the Baxter Foundation Faculty Award, the NIH Director’s New Innovator Award, and the NIH Transformative R01 Award.

To read more about Dr. Wu's prior awards, please see "New Faculty Hires and Promotions: Joe Wu, MD, PhD"; "In the News: Joe Wu, MD, PhD"; "Awards and Honors I: October 9, 2009"; "Research by Dr. Wu and Colleagues Induces Fat Cells to Become iPS Cells"; "Awards and Honors: April 17, 2009"; http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2008/11/awards_and_hono_63.html; http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2008/10/_joseph_wu_md_p.html ; http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2008/06/awards_and_hono_42.html ; and http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2007/04/awards_and_hono_1.html.

Lung Cancer Awareness Month: Seeing the Person Behind the Images

Debra_250.gifDebra with Gilah, her Havanese, who stayed by her side during her two-month recovery after lung surgery: "My husband put her on the bed in the AM before work and took her off nine hours later when he came home. If he left her on the floor, she would cry the whole time he was gone because it was her 'job' to protect me."


By Julie Ruiz-Wibbelsmann, PhD


"We all know that Donna Cronister is special, but let me tell you why she is my personal angel,” said Debra Frank, Radiology administrative associate for the 3D Lab and Drs. Sandy Napel and David Paik. “When I was mailing a card to Donna in thanks for her help on a project, I tripped near the mail boxes on Palm Drive, and I fell, injuring my knee and arm. I had to have stitches to close the cut on my knee as well as a chest X-ray for the pain in my arm.” Because her general practitioner thought he saw something suspicious on the chest X-ray, Debra was sent to Stanford for a CT scan in November of 2007. “If it wasn’t for our Stanford radiologists, I might not be as healthy as I am today. Almost from my first scan, they thought I could have lung cancer.”

Debra was shocked. She had never smoked and had no family history of lung cancer. Before a lung biopsy could be done, she had to see a pulmonologist and an endocrinologist to rule out other diagnoses. Stanford pulmonologists sent her for many tests including a PET/CT scan, bronchoscopy, and another CT scan. After other possible diagnoses were ruled out, she . . .


. . . scheduled an appointment with Thoracic Surgeon Dr. Richard Whyte for a lung biopsy in July of 2008. “After spending seven days in the hospital, I was about to be released without knowing the results of my pathology report. Dr. Whyte walked in the room to discharge me and found me pretty upset. After nine very long months I still did not know whether I had lung cancer or not. Dr. Whyte was wonderful. He went to Pathology and asked to see my preliminary report. The radiologists who had read my first CT scan in late 2007 were correct; I had nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC).”

“The surgery to remove the cancer was rough,” Debra recounted. “The tumor was in the upper lobe of my right lung. There are three lobes on the right side and only two on the left side. The lobes on the left side are near the heart, which is why surgery on the left lobes generally takes much longer and may require a cardiac surgeon in addition to a thoracic surgeon. My surgery was two and a half hours, and I didn't lose a lot of my right lung. After they took out the upper lobe, the lower lobe in my right lung moved up to fill that space. The recovery was really rough because they had to make a seven-inch incision following the curve of my shoulder blade to reach the upper lobe. It has taken a long time for me to heal and some of my nerves still haven't completely regenerated. However, the constant cough I had for about ten years is gone as is the stabbing back pain I had for about a year before my surgery. My husband and daughter used to be able to locate me in public just by listening for my cough. Now I have to remember to carry my cell phone so they can find me.”

Working in our Department, Debra has seen her own images in the 3D Lab and is amazed at their clarity and at the fact that the radiologists can pick up features as small as 1 mm. Because November is Lung Cancer Awareness Month, Debra wanted to share her story to remind everyone “that there is a real person connected to all of these images, and it could very well be one of our colleagues.” She also wants to thank everyone in the Department for the great job they do: “currently, only 15% of people diagnosed with lung cancer make it to the five-year mark, yet here I am almost two and a half years later, cancer free.”

Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death. It is the most common fatal cancer in men (30%) (followed by prostate (9%) and colon & rectal (9%) cancers) and in women (26%), followed by breast (15%) and colon & rectal (9%) cancers. Fifty-three percent of lung cancer in women is not attributed to smoking (from http://www.lungcancerfoundation.org/about-lung-cancer/fact-sheets/).

Because lung cancer is usually diagnosed at a late stage, it is very challenging to treat. However, there has been a recent breakthrough in the early detection of lung cancer using CT. A 2010 study from the National Cancer Institute found that there were 20% less lung cancer deaths in patients who were screened with CT scans than those screened with chest X-rays (http://vimeo.com/16536489). To learn more about this recent discovery highlighted on a news clip from ABC News Channel 7, please access “The NEW Face of Lung Cancer--w/Breaking News Intro,” which also features an interview with Bonnie J. Addario, founder of the Lung Cancer Foundation (BJALCF). Bonnie is a lung cancer survivor who established the BJALCF on March 6, 2006, after Dana Reeve (the wife of Christopher Reeve) lost her own battle with lung cancer shortly after her diagnosis.

In its first four years of existence, Bonnie's foundation raised over four million dollars with the ultimate goal of increasing the low survival rate of lung cancer by “becoming the largest source of non-profit funding dedicated to turning lung cancer into a manageable chronic disease” (http://www.lungcancerfoundation.org/about-us/bonnies-story/). The lack of funding for lung cancer research has kept the overall survival rate at 15.5%, which is the same as it was forty years ago (from http://www.lungcancerfoundation.org/about-lung-cancer/fact-sheets/). To help further lung cancer research, Bonnie established the Addario Lung Cancer Medical Institute (ALCMI) in 2008, which is dedicated “to catalyzing and accelerating the discovery, development and delivery of new and more effective treatment options for lung cancer patients” through projects that focus on early detection, genetic testing, drug discovery, and patient-focused outcomes.

The NEW Face of Lung Cancer--w/Breaking News Intro” also tells the story of Jill Costello, a twenty-two year old UC Berkeley student and athlete who passed away from lung cancer on June 24, 2010, just one year after her diagnosis. You can learn more about her life on You Tube at “Jill Costello at Berkeley, September 28, 2009”; “Jill Costello and Cal Crew Fight Cancer”; and “In Memory of Jill Costello.” The first “Jog for Jill” fundraiser was held on Oct. 3, 2010. The BJALCF also holds a “Jog for Those You Love National Walk/Run Series.” To learn more, please access http://www.lungcancerfoundation.org/events/monday-june-21-2010-golf-tournament/. Other fundraising events include the upcoming “Porsche 2011” classic car show on October 16, 2011.

Danielle Hicks, director of patient advocacy and community relations for the Foundation, created a monthly support group in San Carlos called “The Living Room” for those who are living with lung cancer. According to Danielle, the group's name comes from the desire to create “a space where hope is at the core and where patients and their families, caregivers, and friends could come and share their stories, talk through their struggles, and give one another advice and offer support.” Meeting speakers include pulmonologists, oncologists, yoga instructors, nurse practitioners, and published authors.

The Living Room recently featured author Randy Broad who spoke about his book It's an Extraordinary Life--Don't Miss It. To read his introduction, “Waking Up,” please access Waking Up.pdf, in which he summarizes the main purpose of his book: “I must stress that this book is NOT about cancer. It’s about living an extraordinary life and not waiting to have something like cancer to open your door to living it. cover_150.jpg
As such, I’m highlighting cancer as the instigator. It took cancer for me to realize just how short life is, how important really living it is and then [to] possess the ability to share it with the clarity that having this disease provides.”

Meeting every third Tuesday of each month from 5:30 to 7:30 PM at the Lung Cancer Foundation offices in San Carlos, The Living Room is celebrating its one-year anniversary, and attendees have expressed their gratitude for the group: “Thank you so much for the honesty, sharing your personal stories, advice, and anecdotal suggestions. What a wealth of knowledge our combined group possesses!” For more information regarding The Living Room, please access http://www.lungcancerfoundation.org.

Looking back on her experiences, Debra remarked that she has now become familiar with many Stanford medical facilities and has found the Stanford Medicine Imaging Center (SMIC), Palo Alto, on Sherman Avenue to be quite patient centric: “In some ways, it is like a day spa because they have large-screen TVs, an espresso machine, computers for patient use, as well as free parking. In addition, each person gets his or her own changing room with chairs and a locker.” She also reflected on all the equipment that she has become familiar with in the Stanford Department of Radiology after undergoing CT, MRI, PET/CT, and bone scans, as well as ultrasound imaging: “I joke with Dr. Napel that if I had known I would personally have to test out all the equipment I might have had second thoughts about taking my job. I just hope there is nothing else on order!”

“I would like to dedicate this article to Jason Pick who I am pretty sure is now rowing crew with Jill,” Debra added.

Stanford Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging Clinic Opens

We have significantly expanded our Stanford Nuclear Medicine Division with the opening of the Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging Clinic at Stanford Hospital & Clinics. Housing state-of-the-art imaging equipment, our new Center will "help advance a new generation of diagnostic techniques for earlier detection and improved management of cancer, heart disease and neurological disorders" ("New Imaging Clinic to Help Doctors Identify Diseases at the Molecular Level").


Ribbon cutting ceremony at our new Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging Clinic
Left to right: Elizabeth Sheridan (Radiology Marketing Representative); Andrew Quon, MD (Radiologist); Andrei Iagaru MD (Radiologist); Jayesh Patel (Technical Manager Nuclear Medicine); Sanjiv Sam Gambhir MD, PhD (Radiologist; Director of MIPS; Director of the Canary Center; Chief of Nuclear Medicine); Sheila Galuppo (Radiology Marketing Manager)
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Awards and Honors: November 12, 2010

HofmannLawrenceRusty_150150.jpgLawrence "Rusty" Hofmann, MD, associate professor and chief of interventional radiology, is the inaugural recipient of the Ohio State School of Medicine Early Career Achievement Award for his significant contributions to the field of medicine before the age of 40. In addition to "distinguished early career achievement," the Award criteria includes "demonstrated leadership capability"; "commitment to the service of others"; "potential for leadership/distinction in the long term"; and "substantial commitment to College of Medicine, OSU Medical Center and its mission" (Early Career Achievement Award ).

Dr. Hofmann received his medical degree from the Ohio State University School of Medicine and completed his residency in diagnostic radiology at The Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, Maryland, where he was elected chief resident. He completed his fellowship in cardiovascular and interventional radiology at Stanford University Medical Center and returned to The Johns Hopkins Hospital to become an assistant professor of radiology and surgery for five years before coming to Stanford in 2006.

Dr. Hofmann's clinical research interests include the minimally invasive treatment for deep venous thrombosis as well as the treatment of pulmonary embolus. Focusing on novel therapies for the treatment of cancer, Dr. Hofmann's basic science research interests are concentrated on the development of molecular image-guided therapies. He is a founding member of the American Journal of Nanomedicine, and he has published extensively in peer-reviewed journals, including the American Journal of Roentgenology, the Journal of Vascular Surgery, and the Journal of Vascular and Interventional Radiology. His many medical affiliations include membership in the Society of Cardiovascular and Interventional Radiology and the American Roentgen Ray Society.

In his free moments, Dr. Hofmann enjoys spending time with his family watching the Ohio Buckeye football games and taking his three sons fishing on his boat.

To view his prior blog postings, please access "In the News: Drs. Kothary, Kuo, and Hofmann"; "Stanford IR Research Honored at SIR"; "Dr. Lawrence "Rusty" Hofmann Featured in AuntMinnie.com"; "New Interventional Radiology Rooms Open in the Stanford Comprehensive Cancer Center (SCCC)/Advanced Medical Center (AMC)"; and "New Faculty Hires and Promotions: January 2006-February 2007."

Awards and Honors: November 6, 2010

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Gary Glover, PhD, director of the Radiological Sciences Laboratory in the Richard M. Lucas Center for Imaging; professor of radiology and, by courtesy, of electrical engineering and of psychology, has been awarded the Outstanding Achievement Award by his alma mater, the University of Minnesota, where he earned his undergraduate and graduate degrees in electrical engineering. University President Robert Bruininks presented the Award to Dr. Glover at a special awards ceremony.

The Outstanding Achievement Award is the second highest honor given by the University of Minnesota and is not bestowed annually but only when there are "graduates who have attained unusual distinction in their professions or in public service, and who have demonstrated outstanding achievement and leadership" ("President of ATG Labs Receives Outstanding Achievement Award").

Prior to joining our Department in 1990, Dr. Glover worked at GE’s Corporate Research and Development Center and at GE Medical Systems for more than 20 years. Dr. Glover’s research focuses on the physics and mathematics of CT and MR imaging. Through his research, he has helped develop products that have greatly improved patient care. He has published more than 300 scientific research articles and is named on approximately 50 patents. One of Dr. Glover's research interests was published in an article he coauthored entitled “Control Over Brain Activation and Pain Learned by Using Real-Time Functional MRI" in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA (PNAS) (2005 102:18626-18631; published online before print December 13, 2005, doi:10.1073/pnas.0505210102).

To access his prior blog postings, please see "Awards and Honors: March 3, 2010";
"The Laughing Subject"; "Pain Research by Drs. Sean Mackey, Chris deCharms, Gary Glover, and Colleagues Featured in Nature"; and "Tsinghua University's 'Oversea Expert,' Dr. Gary Glover."


New Staff Hires and Promotions: Ming T. Chou, MAcc

Ming_100.jpgMing Chou, MAcc, joined our Department on October 4th as the finance and administrative manager for the MIPS/Nuclear Medicine Section.

Mr. Chou has a wealth of experience in finance. Prior to joining our Department, he was the senior financial analyst for the Stanford Department of Pathology. When he first came to Stanford in 2003, he served as the research accountant for the Office of Sponsored Research (OSR). Outside of Stanford, Mr. Chou has also worked in many finance positions in industry as well as academia. He earned his master of accountancy from the University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa.

New Faculty Hires and Promotions: Martin Laufik, MD

MLpic_150.jpgMartin Laufik, MD, recently joined our Department as a clinical instructor of body imaging at the Veterans Administration Hospital and Stanford Medical Center. Prior to joining our faculty, Dr. Laufik was a Stanford body imaging fellow. His academic interests include liver and renal imaging, as well as teaching.

Dr. Laufik obtained his BS in biology and BA in economics at Stanford, where he graduated with honors. He attended medical school at the University of California School of Medicine, San Diego. Dr. Laufik left California to complete his preliminary medicine internship at Cabrini Hospital/Mount Sinai in New York City and residency in diagnostic radiology at the University of Arizona, Tucson. In recognition of his teaching expertise, Dr. Laufik has received a 2009 Resident Teaching Award from the University of Arizona and an Excellence in Teaching Award from Stanford University.

When he isn't practicing, Dr. Laufik enjoys soccer, running, travel, and cheering for our Stanford sports teams.


Awards and Honors: October 28, 2010

rubin_jpg_100.gifDaniel Rubin, MD, MS, assistant professor of radiology and a member of both Bio-X and the Stanford Cancer Center, was awarded the 2010 caBIG® Connecting Collaborators Award for his outstanding achievements in enabling collaborations and advances in research within the caBIG program.

caBIG® stands for the "cancer Biomedical Informatics Grid®," which is an "information network enabling members of the cancer community–researchers, physicians, and patients–to share data and knowledge," according to the caBIG® website. Their mission is "to develop a truly collaborative information network that accelerates the discovery of new approaches for the detection, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of cancer, ultimately improving patient outcomes." To learn more, please access https://cabig.nci.nih.gov/overview/.

Dr. Rubin's background is in clinical and investigational radiology as a radiologist and as a researcher. He attended Stanford Medical School and received his master's degree in biomedical informatics. He also completed his residency as well as his body and research fellowships at Stanford University. Dr. Rubin was recruited to Stanford Radiology to participate in building a new section in the information sciences called ISIS (Information Science in Imaging at Stanford). His academic focus is on the intersection of biomedical informatics and imaging science where he is developing computational methods and applications to access and integrate diverse clinical and imaging data; to extract information and meaning from images; to enable data mining and the discovery of image biomarkers; and to translate these methods into practice by creating computer applications that will improve diagnostic accuracy and clinical effectiveness. Dr. Rubin is also chair of the RadLex Steering Committee of the RSNA, an effort to create a standard terminology for all of radiology; chair of the Informatics Committee of the American College of Radiology Imaging Network (ACRIN) and co-chair of the Medical Imaging Systems Working Group of the American Medical Informatics Association.

Other prior blog articles regarding Dr. Rubin include "Dr. Rubin Receives NCI Grant for Quantitative Imaging Research"; "New Faculty Hires and Promotions: December 17, 2008" and "Awards and Honors: December 15, 2008."

National Radiologic Technology Week, November 7th-13th

Established by the American Society of Radiologic Technologists (ASRT), National Radiologic Technology Week is a time to celebrate all the contributions of our technologists since the discovery of the X-ray on November 8, 1895.

During the week of November 7th to the 13th, we proudly celebrate all employees of our Department for providing the highest quality patient care. To kick-off our week, there will be a slide show at the November 4th staff meeting with quotes from physicians, supervisors, and managers about the important "on-the-job" contributions of our technologists. Festivities will start on November 8th and will include a breakfast potluck, cake, staff lunch, ice cream social, and gift raffle. On Tuesday, November 9th, there will be an information table about National Radiologic Technology Week in the atrium from 10 am to 2 PM.

To view prior our prior blog posting regarding this celebratory week, please see "National Radiologic Technology Week: Nov. 8-14, 2009."

Announcements: October 11, 2010

The Radiology Interest Group at Stanford (RIGS) is having a "Radiology Meet and Greet" at 6 PM on Monday, October 18th, at Clark Center Nexus Cafe. Medical students will have the opportunity to meet faculty and residents of the Radiology Department and to learn more about the field radiology. Please RSVP online here.

Led by medical students, RIGS promotes interest in radiology as a career by offering a mentorship program as well as resources for research opportunities in radiology.

Radiology Rays Compete in Division C Championship

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During the 2010 season of the Stanford University Medical Center (SUMC) Softball League, the Rays finished second place in the Division C League Championship after competing with 5 other teams for the Championship title. In the coed all-star game, 2 of the Radiology Rays' players, Kristin Granlund and Sung-Won Yoon, were named MVPs of the game. For more information about their season, please access http://sumc.easycgi.com/2010/index.asp.

Completing their fifth year of competing in the Stanford University Medical Center (SUMC) Softball League, the Radiology Rays were created in 2006 by Fred Chin, PhD, head of Cyclotron Radiochemistry. They welcome all players with varying levels of softball/baseball experience. Many of the current players had no experience with softball when they began playing, but ended up loving the sport! For a listing of present and past members of the Radiology Rays, please click here: Rays _Past Present Members.pdf. Please contact Fred Chin at chinf@stanford.edu if you are interested in playing next season.

To read more about the Stanford University Medical Center (SUMC) Softball League, which is comprised of about twenty-five teams, please see "It’s a Hit! Softball League Opens Its 35th Season." For prior Radiology Rays blog postings, please access
"Radiology Rays Sweep the 2009 Division C Softball League Championship! "; "Radiology Rays' Second Season"; and "Radiology Rays Take a Swing at Their Second Softball Season."

In the News: Sam Mazin, PhD

Dr. Samuel Mazin's innovative idea to minimize the effects of radiation during PET scanning was recently featured in the San Francisco Chronicle article,
"Stanford Opens Entrepreneur Course to Public." Currently a postdoctoral fellow in the Radiological Sciences Laboratory (RSL), mazin_100.gifSam turned his idea into reality by participating in the Stanford Graduate School of Business Summer Institute for Entrepreneurship, where he co-founded RefleXion Medical, a company developing the first cancer treatment system that will enable tumors to non-invasively signal their location during radiotherapy.

Because of his work at the Summer Institute, Sam was named a GlaxoSmithKline Garnier Fellow. The RefleXion project was later a semi-finalist in the 2009 MIT business plan competition as well as a finalist in the 2010 Stanford business plan competition. Sam was one of 13 postdocs in the nation awarded a Kauffman Entrepreneur Fellowship.

Sam holds a PhD (2007) in electrical engineering from Stanford and a BASc (2002) in Computer Engineering from the University of Waterloo, Canada. Sam's PhD at Stanford was focused on the design of a novel X-ray CT system, resulting in an issued patent; the Joel Drillings Award from the American Heart Association; as well as the prestigious Cum Laude Award from the Society of Photographic Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE) International Medical Imaging Conference. He has been invited to speak about his research by the American Heart Association and General Electric's Global Research Center.

His past research focused on inverse geometry CT as well as improving CT imaging for people with metal implants. For Sam's earlier award posting, please see "Awards and Honors: July 28, 2008" and "Awards and Honors: March-April 2007."

Mammography National Awareness Month

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Mammography staff with medical assistants.

October has been designated as "Mammography National Awareness Month" to raise a greater awareness about breast cancer and screening services.

During this month, our Mammography Section at Stanford Hospital & Clinics has planned a variety of educational and training activities for its technologists. Professor of Radiology and Director of the Stanford University Breast Imaging Section Debra Ikeda spoke to our technologists about the controversial new federal guidelines on breast cancer screening that would delay a woman's first mammogram by 10 years and reduce annual screenings to every two years. To read more, about Stanford physician's mammography recommendations, please access "Stanford Experts Question New Guidelines that Recommend Fewer Mammograms" and "In the News: Debra Ikeda, MD." Dr. Ikeda's presentation to our Mammography Section was
followed by a personal story of a patient treated for breast cancer.

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(L to R): Technologist Linda Larson; Dr. Kenneth Meng, fellow; and Dr. Deb Ikeda.

Mammography Section Supervisor Ida Walworth also presented on the work of mammography technologists, emphasizing the qualities necessary to becoming a good mammographer. In particular, she stressed that good mammographers must have the skills of psychologists, such as the ability to listen to patients and elicit information from a patient's clinical history to design the most accurate exam. Ms. Walworth also highlighted the importance of acting as detectives and educators, so that mammographers can provide the highest quality patient care by determining the best way to visualize hard to image abnormalities as well as by answering patient questions regarding procedures, recovery time, the necessity of regular screening, etc.

On Friday, October 8th, our Section hosted an MTMI seminar for about 15 seminar participants. The goal was to introduce beginning mammographers to the art of basic positioning skills that are used for screening mammograms, which include the traditional CC and MLO views. Three employees from our Section participated as instructors and models.

To read more about National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, please access http://www.nbcam.org/.


People and Their Pets: Leela

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Leela is a six-year old German Shepherd. Her owner, Faron Addison, RSL administrative associate, describes Leela as "a wonderful American Kennel Club (AKC) Shepherd that I just adore. She loves to run, play ball, and swim when she gets the chance."

New Staff Hires and Promotions: Faron Addison

FaronA.jpgFaron Addison started working at Stanford University in 2008 and has worked within several areas, including the Office of Medical Development, the Graduate School of Business (GSB), the Department of Psychology, and the Molecular Imaging Instrumentation Laboratory (MIIL). Recently, he accepted a permanent position in the Radiological Sciences Laboratory (RSL) supporting Drs. Robert J. Herfkens and Brian Rutt.

Prior to coming to Stanford University, Faron worked as a due diligence auditor of mortgage-backed securities for a large bank in New York City from 1999 until 2004. He then relocated to San Jose, CA, to take a job as AVP of operations for Aurora Loan Services in Campbell, CA. In 2008, he joined Stanford University as a temporary worker until becoming permanent in September of 2010.

Faron is from Richmond, VA, and currently attends the University of Phoenix and is working towards attaining his BS/BA in business administration. In his spare time, Faron claims he "is an advocate of the equestrian world and has been riding horses for over 20 years." He also enjoys beach life.

National Ultrasound Awareness Month

During the month of October, ultrasound departments and national organizations celebrate the medical contributions of ultrasound professionals while raising awareness about the important role of ultrasound in medicine by educating the public. Ultrasound is a growing field of employment that many find an attractive career because it provides opportunities for patient contact and is noninvasive, requiring no needles, IVs, or radiation. Sonographers need good listening skills, lots of patience, and strong multitasking abilities so that they can take a complete patient history while performing a scan that assures the highest level of patient comfort.

All of our Stanford sonographers are licensed professionals who are very dedicated to their work and take great pride in what they do. One of our most recent hires is sonographer Ke Chen, who interned in our US Section while completing the Foothill College Ultrasound Program. Her background is research in biology, and she brings an eagerness to learn as much as possible and enthusiasm to our academic setting.

To read more about our technologists and our ICAVL accredited lab, please access "Meet the Ultrasound Section at Stanford Hospital and Clinics." More information about National Ultrasound Awareness Month can be found on the American Registry for Diagnostic Medical Sonography (ARDMS) website at http://www.ardms.org/default.asp?contentID=872.

People and Their Pets: Chloee and Daisy at "Bark in the Park"

Daisy (in background) and Chloee (in foreground)
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On Saturday, May 7, 2010, Daisy and Chloee participated in "Bark in the Park" where they entered the 2010 Bark in the Park costume contest as Southern Belles. There were about 40 participants.

Sheila Galuppo, Radiology marketing manager, entered them in the Bark in the Park fundraising event sponsored by the Naglee Park neighborhood's Campus Community Association to raise funds for the CCA, Humane Society Silicon Valley, and San Jose Animal Care Center.

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To read more about Chloee and Daisy, please see "People and Their Pets: Chloee and Daisy" and "People and Their Pets: Daisy."

Announcements II: September 16, 2010

Medical Device Innovation: On September 27th at 5 PM in McCaw Hall at the Arrillaga Alumni Center, Jeffrey Shuren, MD, JD, director of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA)'s Center for Devices and Radiological Health, will be speaking about how the federal government can help private industry foster the development of lifesaving medical devices. Dr. Shuren will be discussing this issue with the following panelists: John Capek, PhD, executive vice president of medical devices at Abbott; Ross Jaffe, MD, managing director of Versant Ventures; Josh Makower, founder and CEO of Exploramed; and Stefanos Zenios, PhD, professor at Stanford’s Graduate School of Business.

To read more, please access "Media Advisory: Top FDA Official to Discuss Medical Device Innovation with Industry Leaders at Stanford."

New Faculty Hires and Promotions: Joe Wu, MD, PhD

Wu_100100.jpgJoseph Wu, MD, PhD, has been promoted to associate professor of medicine (cardiology) as well as radiology effective September 1. Prior to joining our faculty, Dr. Wu completed his fellowship and residency at the University of Los Angeles (UCLA) Medical Center. He received his MD from Yale University School of Medicine and his PhD from UCLA Department of Molecular Pharmacology.

Dr. Wu's clinical interests include adult congenital heart disease, nuclear cardiology, and echocardiography. His basic research focus is on the biological mechanisms of adult stem cells, embryonic stem cells, and induced pluripotent stem cells. He and his team use a combination of gene profiling, tissue engineering, physiological testing, and molecular imaging technologies to better understand stem cell biology in vitro and in vivo. They are interested in monitoring stem cell survival, proliferation, and differentiation for adult stem cells, while for embryonic stem cells, they are currently studying their tumorigenicity, immunogenicity, and differentiation. Further information is available at his lab website: http://wulab.stanford.edu/.

Dr. Wu has published over 100 articles. He has also received many awards, including the Burroughs Wellcome Fund Career Award for Biomedical Scientists, the American College of Cardiology Cardiovascular Imaging Award, the Baxter Foundation Faculty Award, the NIH Director’s New Innovator Award, and the NIH Transformative R01 Award.

To read more about Dr. Wu's prior awards, please see "In the News: Joe Wu, MD, PhD"; "Awards and Honors I: October 9, 2009"; "Research by Dr. Wu and Colleagues Induces Fat Cells to Become iPS Cells"; "Awards and Honors: April 17, 2009"; http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2008/11/awards_and_hono_63.html; http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2008/10/_joseph_wu_md_p.html ; http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2008/06/awards_and_hono_42.html ; and http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2007/04/awards_and_hono_1.html.

New Faculty Hires and Promotions: Michael Zeineh, MD, PhD

Zeineh_2010.gifMichael Zeineh, MD, PhD, joined the Department of Radiology as an assistant professor in the Neuroradiology Section on September 1, 2010. As an undergraduate at the California Institute of Technology, Dr. Zeineh developed an interest in advanced microscopic neuroscientific imaging, which led him to complete a combined MD-PhD program at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). His PhD work focused on using high-resolution structural and functional MRI to investigate the neural underpinnings of memory formation and retrieval. Toward the end of his radiology residency at Stanford, he received a two-year Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) Research Fellowship to pursue high-field imaging in neuroradiology.

As a Stanford neuroradiology fellow, Dr. Zeineh was also awarded General Electric (GE) seed funding to support his ongoing research during his fellowship. His research work and interests are driven by the challenge to noninvasively characterize the microscopic pathology underlying neurologic disease, particularly disease entities with a significant component of pathology invisible to conventional imaging methods. Specifically, Dr. Zeineh utilizes high-field MRI, advanced susceptibility based processing, and diffusion tensor imaging, as well as other novel contrast mechanisms, with the following applications: 1) MR imaging and characterization of amyloid plaques in the brains of Alzheimer’s patients; 2) early in vivo biomarker imaging for Alzheimer’s disease; 3) improved imaging of seizure foci in localization-related epilepsy; 4) identifying network derangements and microstructural alterations in Parkinson’s disease; 5) imaging biomarkers for multiple sclerosis with quantitative imaging (measurement of myelin content); and 6) general applications of ultra-high field MRI for neurologic disease.

Announcements I: September 16, 2010

Free Flu Shots: Stanford will be offering free flu shots for faculty, staff, students, and retirees beginning Oct. 6th. For a flu clinic schedule, please access http://flu.stanford.edu/.

New Faculty Hires and Promotions: Roland Bammer, PhD

rbammer_2010_100.jpgRoland Bammer, PhD, has been promoted to associate professor of radiology (research) and, by courtesy, of neurology & neurological sciences effective August 1, 2010. Prior to joining our faculty in 2004 as an assistant professor, Dr. Bammer was a research associate at the Richard M. Lucas Center for Imaging. He earned his PhD in electrical engineering from Graz University of Technology, Graz, Austria. In 2002, he received his venia docendi (teaching professorship) in medical physics as well as biophysics from the Medical University of Graz, Austria.

His research interests include the development of novel imaging and reconstruction techniques that promise to significantly improve MR exams in both children and adult patients by reducing the overall scan time; improving the diagnostic capacity of the images; and providing an alternative contrast mechanism and the means to understand more clearly the underlying tissue microstructure, particularly in terms of how it is composed and how the brain is anatomically/functionally connected with different regions.

Dr. Bammer has published over 120 peer-reviewed articles, and he has 10 patents, with 4 pending. He has also earned many grants in support of his research and is currently principal investigator on one R21 and four R01 active research projects. In addition to these funding awards, he has received the following honors this past year: the Caffey Scientific Paper Award, 2010, from the Society for Pediatric Radiology and the Senior Fellow of the Freiburg Institute of Advanced Studies (FRIAS), 2010, from the University of Freiburg, Germany.

To view his other blog postings, please access "Awards and Honors: May 19, 2010"; "Awards and Honors: May 21, 2009"; and "Awards and Honors: September 14, 2007";

Announcements: September 13, 2010

Stanford Staffers Social Mixer: Thursday, September 16th, from 5:30 to 7:00 PM at Bangkok Bay Restaurant, Redwood City.

Date: Thursday, September 16
Time: 5:30 - 7:00

Place: Bangkok Bay Restaurant
825 El Camino, Redwood City

RSVP: Elizabeth Lasensky: lasensky@stanford.edu
by September 14

New Faculty Hires and Promotions: Andrei Iagaru, MD

Iagaru_09_100.pngDr. Iagaru recently joined our Department as an assistant professor of radiology, with a subspecialty in nuclear medicine. He completed medical school at Carol Davila University of Medicine, Bucharest, Romania, and an internship at Drexel University College of Medicine, Graduate Hospital, in the Department of Medicine. He began his residency at the University of Southern California (USC) Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles, in the Division of Nuclear Medicine, where he was the chief resident. Dr. Iagaru finished his residency and completed a PET/CT fellowship at Stanford University's School of Medicine in the Division of Nuclear Medicine. His research interests include whole-body MRI and PET/CT for early cancer detection; clinical translation of novel PET radiopharmaceuticals; radioimmunotherapy; optical imaging of breast cancer; as well as PET/CT imaging for thyroid, breast, cervical and ovarian cancers, melanoma, lymphoma, and sarcomas.

Over the past three years as an instructor in Nuclear Medicine, Dr. Iagaru has received several awards including the Society of Nuclear Medicine (SNM) 2009 Image of the Year Award; SNM/American College of Nuclear Medicine (ACNM) Mid-Winter Conference 2010 Best Essay Award; 2009 Western Regional SNM Scientist Award; and a Stanford Cancer Center 2009 Developmental Cancer Research Award in Translational Science. With his interests, background, and training, Dr. Iagaru will find many opportunities for collaboration, teaching, and introducing his successful research into the clinical practice of nuclear medicine.

Please see his other award postings: "Awards and Honors: June 29, 2010"; "Awards and Honors: March 15, 2010"; "Awards and Honors: July 17, 2009"; "Awards and Honors: May 26, 2009"; and "Awards and Honors I: July 15, 2008".

New Faculty Hires and Promotions: Heike Daldrup-Link, MD

DaldrupLink_100.jpgHeike Daldrup-Link, MD, who was previously an associate professor of radiology and pediatrics at the University of California, San Francisco, (UCSF), joined the Stanford Department of Radiology September 1, 1010. She earned her medical degree from the University of Munster, Germany, in 1992 and completed a radiology residency and fellowship in pediatric radiology and molecular imaging at the Technical University of Munich, Germany, in 2004. While at UCSF as a research fellow, Dr. Daldrup-Link studied uses of contrast media for image enhancement. She currently leads several projects including “Monitoring of Stem Cell Engraftment in Arthritic Joints with MR Imaging” (R01); and “Novel Imaging Approach to Monitor Chondrogenic Differentiation of IPS Cells” (R21). Dr. Daldrup-Link is also a practicing radiologist with an interest in pediatric oncology, molecular imaging, general pediatric radiology, and teaching. She is member of the board of directors of the Society for Pediatric Radiology (SPR); member of the Children’s Oncology Group (COG); member of the editorial board of Pediatric Radiology; permanent member of the NIH Cancer Immunology and Immunotherapy Study Section; as well as a member of the program committees for the Association of University Radiologists (AUR) and Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) annual meetings. Recently, she published a textbook entitled Essentials of Pediatric Radiology: A Multimodality Approach, which provides a concise overview of both basic and complex topics encountered by pediatric radiologists in their daily practice. Her textbook also includes a free web-based case review and an online practice exam.

Stanford Radiology Kicks Off the Season

Paulson_200.jpgBy Nichole Paulson, OSC Lead Technologist at Stanford Medicine Outpatient Center

When the Stanford Football team plays, the musculoskeletal radiologist and imaging technologist of Stanford Radiology are not far away. They keep our team playing on the field by quickly diagnosing injuries. Our recently remodeled X-ray room at Stanford Stadium ensures that all of our patients, including the Stanford Football team, receive the best care available.

With the help of Radiology Business Analyst Tori Shannon, we have upgraded our equipment so that we have the latest in cutting-edge imaging technology that allows us to diagnose fractures and other injuries more accurately and faster than ever before. In the past, we used a portable machine and X-ray film that had to be hand carried and processed in the player locker room. However, our new Fuji portable machine is a digital X-ray unit with a built in processor that can display X-rays from injured football players within a couple of minutes. With our new upgrades, our imaging team can now take standing and weight-bearing X-rays, allowing for greater accuracy. Our new equipment also enables our imaging team to print and burn CD copies of the players' films, which not only benefits Stanford football players by reducing X-ray exposures from repeat films, but also members of visiting teams.

New Faculty Hires and Promotions: Jafi Lipson, MD

Jafi.gifDr. Jafi Lipson joined the Department of Radiology on August 1, 2010 as an assistant professor in the Breast Imaging Section. A graduate of Harvard College, UCSF School of Medicine, and UCSF Radiology Residency, Dr. Lipson completed her medical training as a Stanford Breast Imaging Fellow in June 2010. Her research interests include medical informatics applications in breast imaging and breast radiologic-pathologic correlation.

Her prior research activities focused on radiation dose with CT and the associated risk of cancer. As an NIH-funded T32 Research Fellow under the mentorship of Dr. Rebecca Smith-Bindman, Dr. Lipson conducted a study of four Bay Area hospitals in which she reviewed 1,200 CT examinations and dose reports; estimated the effective dose from each examination; and calculated the associated risk of cancer attributable to that effective dose. Her study culminated in an article entitled "Radiation Dose Associated with Common Computed Tomography Examinations and the Associated Lifetime Attributable Risk of Cancer" (Arch Intern Med. 2009 Dec 14;169(22):2078-86), which is one of only a few articles that have raised national attention regarding the issue of medical radiation and the need for clinical practice guidelines to track and reduce dose.

Dr. Lipson's current projects include the creation and evaluation of an Annotated Breast Map, which is an automated, WIKI-form visual summarization of a patient’s breast history; integration of the BI-RADS lexicon for mammography, ultrasound, and MRI into the RSNA RadLex lexicon; and classification and quantification of dynamic contrast enhanced breast MRI patterns of response to poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitor therapy in the neoadjuvant treatment of triple-negative and BRCA-associated breast cancer.

Awards and Honors: September 3, 2010

Contag_100.jpgChristopher Contag, PhD, associate professor of pediatrics (neonatology); associate professor of microbiology & immunology; and associate professor (by courtesy) of radiology, has been awarded a grant by the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM) to fund his stem cell research; he is one of four Stanford researchers to receive an award from the CIRM. According to a recent CIRM press release, "CIRM Allocates $25 Million to Overcome Immune Rejection of Stem Cell Transplantation Therapies," funded research will "develop strategies for overcoming rejection, eliminating potential barriers to moving stem cell therapies to the clinic."

Dr. Contag received both his BS (biology) and PhD (microbiology) from the University of Minnesota. He began his career at Stanford as a postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Microbiology and Immunology studying mother to infant transmission of HIV. This field of study brought him to the Department of Pediatrics, first as a pediatrics fellow in Division of Neonatal and Developmental Medicine, and then as an assistant professor in the Department of Pediatrics, specializing in neonatal and developmental medicine. In this position he sought to pull together the fields of microbiology, pediatrics, and radiology in projects aimed at imaging diseases of the neonate.

Currently, Dr. Contag serves as the associate chief (research) of the . . .

Division of Neonatal and Developmental Medicine and the director of both the Stanford Center for Innovation in In Vivo Imaging (SCI3) as well as the Stanford Center for Photomedicine. He is also the co-director of the Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford (MIPS). As director of the Molecular Biophotonics and Imaging Laboratory (MBIL), Dr. Contag, along with his colleagues, has used imaging to reveal the kinetics of stem cell engraftment and hematopoietic reconstitution, elucidating the nature of minimal residual disease states following cancer therapy and identifying tissue sites that pathogens use to evade the host immune response. Much of this work has used optical methods of molecular imaging, which are extremely powerful in preclinical models and have tremendous potential, but the Contag laboratory seeks to use a wide range of molecular imaging tools to study biology in living animals and humans.

Dr. Contag and his colleagues both develop and use these tools to address biological questions in a multimodality format. The focus of their efforts is the cells and molecules that control the body’s response to insult and that enable the regeneration of damaged tissues and organs. This has led to the development of miniaturized microscopes that can be used for early cancer detection, in vivo studies of cell biology, and image-guided resection.

As part of the recently awarded CIRM grant, Dr. Contag will work with his colleagues, Dr. Michael Bachmann, research associate in the Contag Lab, and Dr. Minnie Sarwall, professor of pediatrics (nephrology), on immunomodulators that can control graft rejection. These will be screened using an in vivo gene screen, where effector proteins are functionally selected in transplanted stem cells. This will reveal key molecules that control immune recognition and rejection, and will lead to selection of molecular targets for controlling rejection of stem cells and newly regenerated tissues.

Dr. Contag has authored over 200 publications; his other recent awards include the Achievement Award from the Society of Molecular Imaging, the opening plenary lecture at the European Society for Molecular Imaging in Warsaw, Poland, and an invited lecture at the Regenerative Medicine Conference in Hilton Head, South Carolina.

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Awards and Honors: August 31, 2010

Quon_100.gifAndrew Quon, MD, assistant professor of radiology (nuclear medicine), and Ivan Cheng, MD, assistant professor of orthopaedic surgery, have received seed funding from the Center for Biomedical Imaging at Stanford (CBIS) for their project, "18F-Sodium Flouride PET/CT for the Pre-Surgical Evaluation of Back Pain."

Andrew Quon, MD, is currently the chief of the PET/CT Clinical Service. Prior to coming to Stanford, Dr. Quon was a clinical staff physician at the University of California, Los Angeles, Medical Center (UCLA). He earned his BA in biology from the University of California, Berkeley, (UCB) before entering medical school at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center. After receiving his MD, Dr. Quon went on to complete his residency in nuclear medicine at the University of California, Los Angeles, Medical Center (UCLA). His research projects include investigations into the use of translational imaging agents, such as 18F-5FU, 18F-FLT, and 18F-NaF. He has published over 40 peer-reviewed articles on his research. In addition to the Walter Wolf Award, Dr. Quon's many honors include a 2007 Journal of Nuclear Medicine Scientific Paper of the Year Award as well as a 2006 AuntMinnie Scientific Paper of the Year.

New Faculty Hires and Promotions: Daniel Sze, MD, PhD

Sze.bmpDaniel Sze, MD, PhD, has been promoted to professor of radiology (diagnostic) in the Interventional Radiology Section. As an undergraduate, he double majored in biochemistry and studio arts at Harvard. After a brief stint as a graphic designer and medical illustrator, he went on to complete an MD and PhD in biophysics at Stanford; an internship at California Pacific Medical Center; and a residency in radiology at UCSF, where he was chief resident. He returned to Stanford for a fellowship in interventional radiology and joined the faculty in 1997. His clinical and research interests include image-guided treatment of cancers using oncolytic viruses, radioembolization, chemoembolization, and ablation. Other interests include the treatment of aortic dissections and aneurysms; the management of portal hypertension and cirrhosis; venous reconstruction and pulmonary embolism; organ transplant-related complications; and magnetic resonance-guided interventions. Dr. Sze received the Young Investigator Award from the Society of Interventional Radiology in 2002. In addition, he has authored over 100 peer-reviewed papers, and he has been a principal investigator or co-investigator in over 40 clinical trials.

Japanese Society of Radiological Technology (JSRT) Visits Stanford

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(Photo courtesy of Mark Riesenberger)
By Mike Moseley, PhD

This last July, Stanford Radiology held its fifth annual Japanese Technologist Summer Training Program, which is a joint educational program in partnership with the Japanese Society of Radiological Technology (JSRT). As in the four previous years, we had twenty-four JSRT participants visit for the week, with technical lectures in the morning; tours and workshops in the afternoon; and social activities such as Giant's baseball, a tour of Sherman, shopping, and biking. The lectures were well received (please see the names of speakers and participants listed below). For the brave of the bunch, our own Sacheen Lelli, Radiology educational outreach assistant conference manager, led a dawn expedition up to the Stanford Dish. Many thanks to everyone who took the time to help out.

The highlight of the week was the reception at Stanford Medicine Imaging Center, on Sherman Avenue, which gave the JSRT members an opportunity to meet and speak with many of our technologists. The Summer Training Program is a great way to introduce ourselves to the international radiology community, while building strong collaborations and more efficient practices in radiology worldwide. Many thanks again to our speakers and to everyone who spent so much time and effort to make this an ongoing success.

Speakers and Participants:
Dr. Frandics Chan
Dr. Fred Chin
Dr. Tim Doyle
Dr. Dominik Fleishmann
Dr. Gary Glazer
Dr. Deb Ikeda
Sacheen Lelli
Teresa Nelson
Dr. Deqiang Qiu
Dr. Andy Quon
Dr. Jianghong Rao
Sandra Rodriguez
Anne Sawyer
Ron Watkins


Two New Books by Dr. Gambhir--Molecular Imaging with Reporter Genes and Molecular Imaging: Principles and Practice

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Sanjiv Sam Gambhir, MD, PhD, has just released two new books, Molecular Imaging with Reporter Genes and Molecular Imaging: Principles and Practice. Co-authored with Dr. Shahriar S. Yaghoubi, Molecular Imaging with Reporter Genes is "the first comprehensive book on all aspects of reporter gene imaging, detailing what is known in the field and future goals for research" and focusing on "a new class of reporter genes . . . developed for imaging molecular events within living subjects" (quoted from the Cambridge University Press website).

Dr. Gambhir is also the senior editor of Molecular Imaging: Principles and Practice, which is comprised of six comprehensive sections ("Molecular Imaging Technologies"; "Chemistry of Molecular Imaging"; "Molecular Imaging in Cell and Molecular Biology"; "Applications of Molecular Imaging"; "Molecular Imaging in Drug Evaluation"; and "Visualization, Quantification of Radiotracer Uptake, Mining Genomic Data, Modeling, and Cost-Effectiveness of Probe Development"). This is the first book "to provide all the pieces for molecular imaging as a field including all the various modalities and biomedical applications" and "to cover the chemistry of imaging agent development as well as all the imaging instrumentation strategies" (quoted from People's Medical Publishing House - USA website).

Dr. Plevritis Uncovers Reason for Reduced Effectiveness of Mammographic Screening

plevritis_150.jpgDr. Sylvia Plevritis and her co-authors have recently published a groundbreaking article in which they attribute the reduced effectiveness of breast cancer screening in women ages 40-49 years to lowered mammographic detectability instead of faster tumor growth rate, when compared to women ages 50-69 years (from "Women in Their Forties Have Lower Mammographic Tumor Detectability"). Published online July 27th in The Journal of the National Cancer Institute, their article, "A Simulation Model Investigating the Impact of Tumor Volume Doubling Time and Mammographic Tumor Detectability on Screening Outcomes in Women Aged 40–49 Years" (Stephanie L. Bailey, Bronislava M. Sigal, Sylvia K. Plevritis) has been featured in multiple online news sources, including one from Madrid, Spain, and on television stations,such as KHSL-TV (Chico, Calif.), WXIN-TV (Indianapolis), WECT-TV (Wilmington, N.C.), and numerous others.

To read a recent news feature regarding their research, please access,
"Women in Their 40s Have Lower Mammographic Tumor Detectability."

Awards and Honors: July 28, 2010

KamayaAya_100.gifAya Kamaya, MD, assistant professor of radiology (diagnostic), was selected as a finalist for the New Investigator Award at the American Institute of Ultrasound in Medicine in San Diego, CA, on March 25, 2010.

Since the completion of her fellowship in body imaging at Stanford in 2005, Dr. Kamaya has been a clinical instructor, clinical assistant professor, and assistant professor in the abdominal imaging section at Stanford. During this time, she was given two teaching awards for her outstanding contributions to resident education, compassionate patient care, and research. She is currently the associate fellowship director of the Stanford Body Imaging Fellowship.

Prior to coming to Stanford for her fellowship, she completed her residency in diagnostic radiology at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, where she was awarded the Executive Council Award from the American Roentgen Ray Society for her work on "Color Doppler Twinkling Artifact" and the Laurence A. Mack Research Award from the Society of Radiologists in Ultrasound for her work on "Linear Streak Artifact." She completed medical school at the University of Utah in her hometown of Salt Lake City. As an undergraduate, she double majored in engineering sciences and Asian Studies, securing her two bachelor's degrees at Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire. Her research interests include investigating new ultrasound technologies such as photoacoustic ultrasound, in conjunction with the Electrical Engineering Department at Stanford; liver imaging; and women's imaging. Outside of work, her favorite activities include skiing and snowboarding (her favorite ski resort is Snowbird, UT), as well as running, surfing, and traveling.


In the News: Sylvia Plevritis, PhD

plevritis_150.jpgSylvia Plevritis, PhD, associate professor (diagnostic radiology) and co-director of ISIS (Information Sciences in Imaging at Stanford), has been awarded $12.8 million over 5 years to establish one of 12 Centers for Cancer Systems Biology (CCSB) funded by the National Cancer Institute (NCI). Dr. Plevritis' Stanford CCSB, “Modeling the Role of Differentiation in Cancer Progression," has grown from another program that she directs: the Stanford Integrative Cancer Biology Program (ICBP).

As director of the Stanford CCSB, Dr. Plevritis will lead a multidisciplinary team in researching the molecular mechanisms underlying cancer progression by studying cancer as a complex biological system that is driven, in part, by impaired differentiation. The overarching goal of the Center is to provide a better understanding of the self-renewing properties of cancer that will enable the identification of molecular therapeutic targets and strategies to eradicate this disease, or to maintain it in a nonlethal state. In addition, the Stanford CCSB’s efforts in education and outreach will provide the next generation of cancer researchers with a solid foundation in integrative experimental and computational methods of scientific research.

Inside Stanford Medicine recently featured her award in an article entitled "$12 Million Grant to Fund New Approach to Cancer Study at Stanford" in which Dr. Plevritis describes how the Center's approach differs from that of other scientific methods: “Rather than starting with a hypothesis then collecting data to test it, we start by collecting global expression data, analyze the data with computational methods to generate a hypothesis, then collect new data to test the hypothesis.” To read the full article, please access $12 Million Grant to Fund New Approach to Cancer Study at Stanford."

Dr. Plevritis received both her PhD in electrical engineering and her MS in health services research from Stanford University. She was also a postdoctoral scholar in the Magnetic Resonance Systems Research Laboratory in the Department of Electrical Engineering and an NRSA (National Service Award)-postdoctoral fellow in the Departments of Electrical Engineering and Health Research and Policy while at Stanford. A few of her past accomplishments include 44 peer-reviewed publications and selection as a 2007 Stanford School of Medicine Faculty Leadership Program Fellow.

Awards and Honors: July 20, 2010

KamayaAya_100.gifAya Kamaya, MD, assistant professor of radiology (diagnostic), has received the Certificate of Merit Award for her research exhibit entitled “Recurrence in the Thyroidectomy Bed: Sonographic Findings" at the May 2010 American Roentgen Ray Society meeting in San Diego.

Since the completion of her fellowship in body imaging at Stanford in 2005, Dr. Kamaya has been a clinical instructor, clinical assistant professor, and assistant professor in the abdominal imaging section at Stanford. During this time, she was given two teaching awards for her outstanding contributions to resident education, compassionate patient care, and research. She is currently the associate fellowship director of the Stanford Body Imaging Fellowship.

Prior to coming to Stanford for her fellowship, she completed her residency in diagnostic radiology at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, where she was awarded the Executive Council Award from the American Roentgen Ray Society for her work on "Color Doppler Twinkling Artifact" and the Laurence A. Mack Research Award from the Society of Radiologists in Ultrasound for her work on "Linear Streak Artifact." She completed medical school at the University of Utah in her hometown of Salt Lake City. As an undergraduate, she double majored in engineering sciences and Asian Studies, securing her two bachelor's degrees at Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire. Her research interests include investigating new ultrasound technologies such as photoacoustic ultrasound, in conjunction with the Electrical Engineering Department at Stanford; liver imaging; and women's imaging. Outside of work, her favorite activities include skiing and snowboarding (her favorite ski resort is Snowbird, UT), as well as running, surfing, and traveling.

Awards and Honors: July 19, 2010

Christie Draper, PhD, radiology postdoctoral scholar in Dr. Gold's lab; Garry Gold, MD, associate professor (diagnostic radiology); and Andrew Quon, MD, assistant professor (nuclear medicine), received the Society of Nuclear Medicine's (SNM) Correlative Imaging Council/Walter Wolf Award for their abstract, "Correlation between MRI and NaF PET/CT in Patients with Patellofemoral Knee Pain" (Draper CE, Fredericson M, Besier TF, Beaupre GS, Delp SL, Gold GE, Quon A). According to the SNM website, "[t]he Walter Wolf Award is given to the best abstract presented in a clinical or research aspect of correlative imaging. The award was named in honor of Dr. Wolf who was president of the CIC from 1999 to 2005." Dr. Draper presented their award-winning abstract at the June 2010 Annual Meeting of the Society of Nuclear Medicine (SNM).

Draper_100.gifChristie received her BS in biomedical engineering from Case Western Reserve University and her MS and PhD in mechanical engineering from Stanford University. Her dissertation work involved developing techniques to accurately measure knee joint kinematics from real-time MRI. As a postdoctoral scholar in Radiology, her research focuses on evaluating the potential of using 18F NaF PET/CT to diagnose and understand the causes of knee pain. In 2009, she was awarded the Clinical Biomechanics Award at the American Society of Biomechanics Meeting for her work evaluating differences between weight-bearing and non-weight-bearing knee joint kinematics.

Gold01B.jpg
Garry E. Gold, MD, associate professor of radiology and (by courtesy) bioengineering and orthopedics at Stanford University, received a master's degree in electrical engineering from Stanford in 1988 and his MD from Stanford in 1992. Dr. Gold has authored over 90 journal articles, 250 abstracts, and 7 patents in MRI. He has been the principal investigator or a co-investigator on over 30 funded research projects, and he is the principal investigator on two NIH-funded projects to improve MR imaging of osteoarthritis and the use of real-time MRI for the study of biomechanics. The International Skeletal Society awarded Dr. Gold the President's Medal, and this is the sixth time he was been awarded the Lauterbur Award for the best MRI paper from the Society for Computed Body Tomography and Magnetic Resonance (SCBT/MR). Dr. Gold reviews manuscripts for 10 peer-reviewed journals, including the Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (JMRI) and the Journal of Magnetic Resonance in Medicine (MRM), and he is on the editorial board of several publications. At Stanford, Dr. Gold practices clinical musculoskeletal radiology, teaching medical students, residents, and fellows. He teaches courses in imaging physics and human anatomy for medical students and graduate students, and he was awarded the Kaiser Award for outstanding and innovative contributions to education. He also serves as an advisor and co-advisor for many engineering graduate students and postdoctoral fellows.

Quon_100.gifAndrew Quon, MD, is currently an assistant professor of radiology in the Division of Nuclear Medicine as well as the chief of the PET/CT Clinical Service. Prior to coming to Stanford, Dr. Quon was a clinical staff physician at the University of California, Los Angeles, Medical Center (UCLA). He earned his BA in biology from the University of California, Berkeley, (UCB) before entering medical school at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center. After receiving his MD, Dr. Quon went on to complete his residency in nuclear medicine at the University of California, Los Angeles, Medical Center (UCLA). His research projects include investigations into the use of translational imaging agents, such as 18F-5FU, 18F-FLT, and 18F-NaF. He has published over 40 peer-reviewed articles on his research. In addition to the Walter Wolf Award, Dr. Quon's many honors include a 2007 Journal of Nuclear Medicine Scientific Paper of the Year Award as well as a 2006 AuntMinnie Scientific Paper of the Year.


Announcements: July 15, 2010

The Clayman Institute is featuring the photography of Heike Liss in an exhibit called
“Home is When I Belong.” The Liss exhibit will run Monday through Friday (10 AM to 5 PM) from June 28th until Octboer 15, 2010 at the Clayman Institute, which is located at the Serra House at 589 Capistrano Way on the Stanford campus.

The "Event Detail" page from the Clayman Institute includes the following description: "'Home is When I Belong' is an exhibition that brings together photographs from two series of works by Heike Liss, a German born artist who spends her time living, working, and traveling in California and Europe with her husband and children. The first series, 'home/away' (since 2002), contains photographs taken in hotel rooms during the artist’s travels. Liss says: 'I think of these images as portraits that speak of a sense of a lack of belonging: in a place, in a time, in the world.' The second series of photographs in Home is When I Belong is the artist’s more formal 'Family Portraits' (since 2003). Here Liss photographs people in their homes in and around Oakland, eloquently capturing the diverse range of family structures existent today. Across both series, Liss investigates how we define ourselves in relation to the fundamentally human concepts of 'home' and 'family.' Her photographs reveal some of the universal aspects of life experience and identity within varied socio-cultural situations.

For more information, please click here.

Announcements: July 12, 2010

First-Come, First-Served Stanford Staffers Ice Cream Social!
July 14th (Wednesday)
12:10-1:00 PM
In front of the Old Union

There will be prizes: $5.00 gift cards to a local ice creamery! For more information, please contact Sunny Toy at toy@stanford.edu.

Awards and Honors II: July 12, 2010

grant_alex.jpgAlex Grant, MS, a graduate student in the Molecular Imaging Instrumentation Lab (MIIL), has received the Bio-X Graduate Student Fellowship. This 3-year fellowship will support his research designing and fabricating test electronics for novel radiation detection devices and experimental fiber-based optical processing setups for new positron emission tomography technology. To date, he has presented or published a total of 6 presentations and articles on his research.

Prior to beginning the Stanford Bioengineering PhD Program, Mr. Grant worked as a researcher at the Beckman Laser Institute and Medical Clinic at the University of California, Irvine, which is also where he received his BS in physics. In addition to the Bio-X Fellowship, he has received the UC Regents Scholarship and the Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship, both from UC Irvine. In his spare time, he can be found traveling, enjoying the beach, and playing bass.


In the News: Drs. Kothary, Kuo, and Hofmann

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In a recent study of 65 second-year medical students, 52% of the students were aware
of interventional radiology "involvement in major and potentially life-saving procedures; however, 34% believed that an interventional radiologist primarily performed 'minor' procedures or 'read films,'" according to Drs. Kothary, Kuo, and Hofmann (pictured above left to right), who published their findings in Making the Case for Early Medical Student Education in Interventional Radiology: A Survey of 2nd-Year Students in a Single U.S. Institution (J Vasc Interv Radiol. 2010;21(4):549-53).

Their research was featured in the June 2010 Imaging Economics article entitled, "Innovative Revolutionaries." According to the article, the opinions of the medical students changed when surveyed again after a one-hour case-based introductory lecture regarding interventional radiology: "After the lecture, 74% of the class was eager to learn more about the specialty, with 22% interested in enrolling in a dedicated hands-on elective in IR. . . . Before the lecture, 19% were considering IR as a career (first or second choice); this increased to 33% after the introductory lecture.” To read the full article, please access "Innovative Revolutionaries."

Awards and Honors I: July 12, 2010

Lau.jpgFrances Lau, MS, a PhD candidate at Stanford, received the California Breast Cancer Research Program Dissertation Award . This award will fund her project designing a mixed-signal front-end integrated circuit with fast timing for positron emission tomography (PET) applications. She is also working on the development of hardware for a 1mm resolution breast cancer imaging PET system. For more information on these projects, see http://miil.stanford.edu.

To view her prior blog postings, please access "Awards and Honors II: December 5, 2008"; "Awards and Honors: December 17, 2007"; "Awards and Honors: August 2, 2007"; and "Awards and Honors: July 3, 2007."

Dr. Pat Basu Named White House Fellow

BasuChiefResident_200.jpgNamed as one of 13 White House Fellows by President Obama, Dr. Basu will serve during 2010-2011 year in Washington, D.C., as an assistant to a high-level government official. According to the American College of Radiology, he "is the first radiologist to ever receive such an appointment and one of only a few physicians to serve in this role" (from "ACR Member First Radiologist Appointed White House Fellow").

Later this month, Dr. Basu will fly to D.C. to discuss the details of his assignment. . As described in "The Stanford Daily," the responsibilities of fellows "range from . . .

. . . chairing interagency meetings and designing federal policies to drafting speeches for cabinet secretaries” and participating “in an education program consisting of roundtable discussions with renowned leaders from the private and public sectors, and trips to study U.S. policy in action both domestically and internationally" (from "Stanford Doctor Named 2010 White House Fellow").

Dr. Basu was selected after multiple rounds of interviews with government officials over the course of 4 days regarding topics "ranging from health care reform to the handling of the Gulf oil spill" (from "Stanford Doc Picked for White House Fellowship"). Selection as a Fellow is "highly competitive and based on a record of remarkable early career professional achievement, evidence of leadership potential, a proven commitment to public service, and the knowledge and skills necessary to contribute successfully at the highest levels of the Federal government" (from the June 22, 2010 Official Whitehouse News Release).

In a recent interview, Dr. Basu described his selection as a "simultaneous feeling of pride and humility. I am proud to represent the educators, physicians, business leaders and mentors who helped me attain this position. At the same time, I am humbled to be able to stand shoulder to shoulder with some of America's finest citizens who represent military leaders, captains of industry, legal scholars and physicians. I feel grateful to have been chosen from such a truely incredible group of peers" (from "'That a First Generation American Could Make It This Far is Testament to the Ideals of This Great Nation'").

Dr. Basu is a board certified radiologist who recently accepted a faculty appointment in the Department of Radiology, where he was previously a chief resident. In addition to his clinical duties, his academic responsibilities include enhancing outpatient imaging operations and patient care quality as well as conducting research pertaining to healthcare costs, access, and quality. Dr. Basu has been invited to speak on these issues nationally and internationally. In addition, he serves as director of the "Health Economics, Finance, and Policy" course offered to Stanford physicians and medical students. He also directs the STARS Luncheon Program, a nonprofit designed to support lower socioeconomic children for future college and career success. His other career accomplishments include serving as a consultant for medical centers, Fortune 500 companies, and venture capital firms, as well as co-founding "ExtendMD," a Web portal meant to enhance outpatient care (from "Stanford Radiologist Named White House Fellow: Thirteen Picked for Professional Achievement, Leadership Potential, Public Service").

Prior to coming to Stanford, Dr. Basu served as chief resident during his intern year at Resurrection Hospital in Chicago. He graduated with honors from the University of Chicago, earning his MD and MBA degrees. While attending the University of Chicago, he served in the highest leadership roles as president of his business school cohort and as the representative for his medical school class on the Dean’s Council. He also led the Adolescent Substance Abuse Program. As an undergraduate, Dr. Basu attended the University of Illinois on a National Merit Scholarship, where he graduated with honors in mechanical engineering and served on the University senate. Dr. Basu's most recent accomplishment as a named White House Fellow extends his already substantial list of accolades, which also includes serving as a 2008 Chief Radiology Resident and earning the 2007 American Medical Association (AMA) National Excellence in Medicine Award for Leadership.

Please access the following articles to read more about Dr. Basu's Award:

June 22, 2010 Official Whitehouse News Release

"Stanford Doctor Named 2010 White House Fellow"

"Stanford Radiologist Named White House Fellow: Thirteen Picked for Professional Achievement, Leadership Potential, Public Service"

"Stanford Doc Picked for White House Fellowship"

"ACR Member First Radiologist Appointed White House Fellow"

"Naperville Native Named White House Fellow"

"Two Indian-Americans appointed as White House Fellows"

"Two Pritzker Graduates Selected to Serve as White House Fellows "

"Pat Basu, Sunny Ramchandani Among White House Fellows"

"'That a First Generation American Could Make It This Far is Testament to the Ideals of This Great Nation'"

For his prior blog postings, please see Awards and Honors II: June 15, 2010 ; Medical Imaging: The Good, the Bad & the Ugly"; "Chief Resident Pat Basu Named Consultant of the Year"; "The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly" in Imaging: Radio Interview by Dr. Pat Basu"; "Dr. Basu Completes the 2008 J.T. Rutherford Government Relations Fellowship"; Awards and Honors II: July 15, 2008; Awards and Honors: February 2007; Awards and Honors: August 13, 2007; and "Our New Chief Residents for 2008-2009."


Awards and Honors: July 8, 2010

Nnewihe_100.gifAnderson Nnewihe, MS, graduate student in the lab of Dr. Brian Hargreaves, has received the First Place Best Poster Award for his poster, "High Resolution Breast MRI," at the 2nd Annual Center for Biomedical Imaging at Stanford (CBIS) Symposium: “Imaging Inside Out: Biomedical Imaging from Atom to Adam" on April 22, 2010.

As a PhD candidate in the Stanford Department of Bioengineering, Anderson's research focuses on hardware design for the multinuclear imaging of the breast and the knee. In 2005, he graduated from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) with a BS degree in electrical engineering; in 2007, he received an MS degree in bioengineering at Stanford. His goals are to translate his research on multinuclear imaging to the clinical setting to expedite scans, improve image resolution, and facilitate diagnosis. He also has a marked interest in health care for his home country, Nigeria.

Please access his prior blog posting: "Awards and Honors: April 17, 2008."


Awards and Honors II: July 7, 2010

Hongguang-Simon-Liu_150.jpgHongguang Liu, PhD, a postdoctoral scholar in the Cancer Molecular Imaging Chemistry Laboratory (CMICL), was awarded a first place Molecular Imaging Center of Excellence (MICoE) Young Investigator Award for his abstract, "Noninvasive Molecular Imaging of Radioactive Tracers Using Optical Imaging Techniques" (G. Ren, Z. Miao, X. Zhang, X. Tang, P. Han, S.S. Gambhir, and Z. Cheng) presented at the Annual Meeting of the Society of Nuclear Medicine (SNM 2010) in Salt Lake City, UT.

At the SNM Annual Meeting press conference, his abstract was also selected as one of the the "top 5" research abstracts presented during the SNM meeting. Dr. Liu and his co-authors, Drs. G. Ren, Z. Miao, X. Zhang, X. Tang, P. Han, S.S. Gambhir, and Z. Cheng, recently published their paper, (based on the award-winning abstract) in PLoS ONE: ""Molecular Optical Imaging with Radioactive Probes" (Liu H, Ren G, Miao Z, Zhang X, Tang X, et al. (2010) "Molecular Optical Imaging with Radioactive Probes." PLoS ONE 5(3): e9470. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0009470).

Before becoming a postdoctoral scholar in the Cancer Molecular Imaging Chemistry Laboratory, Dr. Liu was a visiting instructor in the Laboratory. He received his PhD in molecular imaging and radiation medicine from the Institute of Radiation Medicine at the Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences in Peking Union Medical College. He also holds a Master of Science from the Department of Developmental Biology from China Medical University, Shenyang, Liaoning, PRC.

In his free time, Dr. Liu enjoys jogging, swimming, reading, and contemplation.

Awards and Honors I: July 7, 2010

Gang Ren, PhD; Rong Zhang; Zhe Liu, PhD; Jack M. Webster, PhD; Zheng Miao, PhD; Sam Gambhir, MD, PhD; Faisal A. Syud, PhD; and Zhen Cheng, PhD, have received a Best Basic Science Paper Award from The Journal of Nuclear Medicine (JNM) for their article entitled "A 2-Helix Small Protein Labeled with 68Ga for PET Imaging of HER2 Expression" (2009;50(9):1492-1499). Their paper was one of three basic science papers chosen for the 2009 award, which was presented to them at the 2010 Society of Nuclear Medicine Annual Meeting in Salt Lake City, UT.

Drs. Ren, Liu, and Miao, are members of the Cancer Molecular Imaging Chemistry Laboratory (CMICL), which is directed by Dr. Cheng and part of the Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford (MIPS) directed by Dr. Gambhir. Drs. Zhang, Webster, and Syud are their collaborators at GE Global Research.

New Faculty Hires and Promotions: Daniel Spielman, PhD

SpielmanDan_150.gifDan Spielman, PhD, has been promoted to professor of radiology, effective 7/01/10. Dr. Spielman has been a faculty member at Stanford since 1993, when he joined our Department as an assistant professor. In June of 2000, he was promoted to associate professor.

Prior to joining the Stanford Radiology faculty, Dr. Spielman attended Stanford University as a graduate student, earning his MA in statistics and his PhD in electrical engineering. While in graduate school, he began working as a research assistant in the Electrical Engineering Department, joining our Department in 1990 as a research affiliate in the Stanford Radiological Science Laboratory (RSL).

He has over 90 publications on in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) and has 10 U.S. patents (either issued or pending) on novel MRSI techniques and associated signal processing methods. His current research effort focuses on high field 1H spectroscopy of the human brain and metabolic imaging of small animal models using hyperpolarized 13C MRSI. Applications of his work include diagnosis and understanding of neurodegenerative disorders, cancer detection and treatment monitoring, and metabolic studies of ischemic heart disease.

In the News: Dr. Christie Draper

Draper_150.gifResearch by Christie Draper, PhD, Radiology postdoctoral scholar in Dr. Gold's lab, along with Radiology co-authors Garry Gold, MD, and Andy Quon, MD, was recently featured in an AuntMinnie.com article entitled "F-18 NaF PET/CT Helps Detect Source of Patellofemoral Knee Pain." According to Christie, their main hypothesis was "that F-18 sodium fluoride PET/CT can be used to visualize localized regions of bone remodeling that occur in response to elevated tissue stress at the joint." They found that their PET/CT technique can help detect additional abnormalities 49% of the time in patients with patellofemoral knee pain. To read the full article, please access http://www.auntminnie.com/index.asp?Sec=sup&Sub=mri&Pag=dis&ItemId=91023 or download the PDF: F18 NaF PET_CT.pdf.

Christie received her BS in biomedical engineering from Case Western Reserve University and her MS and PhD in mechanical engineering from Stanford University. Her dissertation work involved developing techniques to accurately measure knee joint kinematics from real-time MRI. As a postdoctoral scholar in Radiology, her research focuses on evaluating the potential of using 18F NaF PET/CT to diagnose and understand the causes of knee pain. In 2009, she was awarded the Clinical Biomechanics Award at the American Society of Biomechanics Meeting for her work evaluating differences between weight-bearing and non-weight-bearing knee joint kinematics.

Awards and Honors II: July 6, 2010

pratx.gifGuillem Pratx, PhD, postdoctoral scholar in the Image-Guided Intervention Laboratory, has been awarded two honors: a Dean's Postdoctoral Fellowship and an American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) Research Seed Grant. Dr. Pratx will use his Fellowship and Grant to support his research in X-ray luminescence computed tomography.

Dr. Pratx completed his undergraduate work in engineering at the Ecole Centrale in Paris, France. At Stanford, his dissertation research focused on the development of practical algorithms that exploit graphics processing units (GPU) for fast medical image reconstruction in ultra-high resolution PET systems under development at the University. To read more, please access his personal webpage: http://www.stanford.edu/~pratx/. Please also see Dr. Pratx's earlier award postings by accessing "Awards and Honors I: September 23, 2009"; "Awards and Honors: August 2, 2007"; " Awards and Honors: December 17, 2007"; "Awards and Honors II: December 5, 2008"; and "Awards and Honors II: July 18, 2008."




Awards and Honors I: July 6, 2010

Hackel_Photo_-_High[1]_150.gifBenjamin Hackel, PhD, postdoctoral scholar in the Multimodality Molecular Imaging Laboratory (MMIL) and member of the Canary Center for Cancer Early Detection, has been awarded the American Cancer Society/Canary Foundation Early Detection of Cancer Postdoctoral Fellowship for his research on the development of molecular imaging agents for early cancer detection. Under the direction of Dr. Sam Gambhir, Dr. Hackel is investigating the integration of novel protein scaffolds with both traditional and emerging imaging modalities to reduce the limits of tumor detection.

Prior to joining the MMIL, Dr.Hackel received his PhD in chemical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Cambridge, MA. He has published eight articles in his field of research and his past awards include the National Defense Science and Engineering Graduate Fellowship and the National Science Foundation Graduate Fellowship.

In the News: William Kuo, MD

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William Kuo, MD, assistant professor of vascular and interventional radiology and CV/interventional fellowship director, was recently featured in Inside Stanford Medicine and Business Wire for "applying endovascular laser technology to successfully retrieve permanently embedded inferior vena cava (IVC) filters." According to the article, "Removing Tiny Filter Embedded in Vein Takes Stanford Hospital’s Unique Expertise," Dr. Kuo and his colleagues at Stanford Hospital & Clinics are "believed to be the first in the world" to apply this technology for filter retrieval in the human IVC, and "Stanford is currently the only hospital in the country where these procedures are routinely performed."

Because of their innovative, noninvasive methods, Dr. Kuo and his team are now able to treat high-risk patients who had no treatment options prior to the development of laser technology for the removal of IVC filters. Using real-time X-ray fluoroscopy to guide a very thin catheter to the embedded filter, Dr. Kuo can remove IVC filters from patients using minimally invasive techniques, with very quick recovery times. Most recently, he treated a patient at Stanford Hospital & Clinics who had an embedded IVC filter with perforation into her intestines, which had been inserted into her inferior vena cava more than 18 years ago. To read more, please access "Removing Tiny Filter Embedded in Vein Takes Stanford Hospital’s Unique Expertise,"

To view a published article regarding Dr.Kuo's IVC retrieval techniques, please access "High-Risk Retrieval of Adherent and Chronically Implanted IVC Filters: Techniques for Removal and Management of Thrombotic Complications" (KuoIVCarticle.pdf) (Journal of Vascular and Interventional Radiology 12(20);2009: 1548-1556). He presented his newest data on the use of his laser technique at the 2010 Society of Interventional Radiology meeting.

Awards and Honors: July 1, 2010

Andrew_Lee_Profile_Picture_150.jpgAndrew Lee, Stanford medical student in the Cardiovascular Gene and Cell Therapy Laboratory (CGCT), has received a three- year Bio-X Graduate Student Fellowship Award. Andrew will use his award starting the fall of 2010 to enter the Chemical and Systems Biology PhD Program, where he will collaborate with the laboratory of Dr. Paul Wender in the Department of Chemistry to develop a novel molecular transporter and nanoparticle hybrid complex to improve stem cell survival following transplantation into the ischemic myocardium. Using noninvasive molecular imaging, Andrew and his collaborators will assess the engraftment, migration, and fate of cells delivered into the myocardium with this complex.

As an undergraduate at Yale University, Andrew conducted research on measuring indices of asynchrony in the left ventricular myocardial contraction of patients in heart failure using cardiac MRI. After graduating with a BS in East Asian Studies and biology, he entered medical school at Stanford University, hoping to learn about alternative therapies for treating ischemic heart disease. Currently finishing his third year of medical school, Andrew is working with Dr. Joseph Wu to use noninvasive molecular imaging to monitor cell engraftment and survival following therapeutic delivery to the heart. In the future, he hopes to apply these imaging technologies to human clinical stem cell trials. Andrew's other research interests include developing novel methods of imaging and treating tumors derived from pluripotent stem cells as well as creating innovative methods of inducing pluripotency in adult somatic cells.

In the past, Andrew's research has been supported by the Stanford Medical Scholars Research Program, the American Heart Association, and the Howard Hughes Medical Institution. He is currently supported by a Radiological Society of North America Medical Student Grant. He has published over 13 peer reviewed journal articles on the topics of molecular imaging of stem cells and induction of pluripotency while at Stanford. His other activities include volunteering at the Stanford Medical School Pacific Free Clinic (PFC), where he was a former student manager.

Please view his prior blog posting: "Awards and Honors: April 5, 2010."

Awards and Honors II: June 29, 2010

RakowPenner_100.jpgRebecca Rakow-Penner, MD/PhD candidate in biophysics and graduate student in the Radiological Sciences Laboratory, has been honored with the 2010 Norman Blank Award for the outstanding medical student in radiology. The award was created in memory of longtime faculty member and Director of Admissions Norman Blank, MD.

In our Department, Rebecca has worked in the Radiological Sciences Laboratory with Dr. Gary Glover and with Dr. Bruce Daniel, where she has conducted extensive research for imaging vascular characteristics of tumors in breast cancer using blood oxygen level sensitive MRI. She has also served as a teaching assisant in Dr. Garry Gold's radiology 220 course, "Imaging Anatomy."

Before coming to Stanford, Rebecca received her MS in bioengineering from the California Institute of Technology and her SB in engineering with an emphasis on biomedicine from Harvard University. Currently, Rebecca is an MD/PhD student in biophysics, who will graduate from her PhD program this spring. She expects her MD degree in the spring of 2011.

As a graduate student at Stanford, Rebecca is developing unique MRI technology for breast imaging. She was recently a finalist for the Young Investigator Moore Award at the International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine (ISMRM) annual meeting held in Stockholm for her research on blood oxygen level dependent MRI in the breast. In addition to research, Rebecca enjoys teaching and has been a teaching assistant for four different classes; three of which were in the Department of Radiology. Her other numerous activities include serving as the president for the Radiology Interest Group at Stanford (RIGS) and working as a legislative ambassador for the American Cancer Society of Northern California, which involves meeting with legislators to encourage them to support cancer research funding.

Please access her prior blog posting at "Awards and Honors I: January 29, 2010".

Awards and Honors I: June 29, 2010

Iagaru_09_100.pngAndrei Iagaru, MD, instructor of Nuclear Medicine, has earned the 2009 Alavi/Mandell Award for his article entitled "A Novel Strategy for a Cocktail 18F Fluoride and 18F FDG PET/CT Scan for Evaluation of Malignancy: Results of the Pilot Phase Study" published in The Journal of Nuclear Medicine. He received his award at the 2010 Society of Nuclear Medicine (SNM) Annual Meeting in Salt Lake City, UT. This is the third year in a row that Dr Iagaru has received this award.

Andrei Iagaru, MD, completed medical school at the Carol Davila University of Medicine, Bucharest, Romania, and an internship at Drexel University College of Medicine, Graduate Hospital, in the Department of Medicine. He began his residency at the University of Southern California (USC) Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles, in the Division of Nuclear Medicine, where he was the chief resident. He finished his residency and completed a PET/CT fellowship at Stanford University's School of Medicine in the Division of Nuclear Medicine. He is currently an instructor in the Department of Radiology where his research interests include whole-body MRI and PET/CT for early cancer detection; radioimmunotherapy; optical imaging of breast cancer; clinical translation of novel PET radiopharmaceuticals; and PET/CT imaging for thyroid/breast cancers, melanoma, lymphoma, and sarcoma.

Please see his other award postings: "Awards and Honors: March 15, 2010"; "Awards and Honors: July 17, 2009"; "Awards and Honors: May 26, 2009"; and "Awards and Honors I: July 15, 2008".

Awards and Honors: June 24, 2010

Shijun_Hu[1]_100.gifShijun Hu, PhD, postdoctoral fellow in the Cardiovascular Gene and Cell Therapy (CGCT) Laboratory, has received a two-year American Heart Association Postdoctoral Fellowship Award for his research on the transplantation and imaging of novel cardiac stem cell therapy. His project investigates the safety and efficacy of novel iPSC-derived cardiomyocytes (iPSC-CMs) and their therapeutic potential for the treatment of cardiovascular disease, which is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in U.S. Dr. Hu's work will help drive major innovations in treating human cardiovascular disease in the twenty-first century.

The American Heart Association Postdoctoral Fellowship Award is designed to assist trainees "to initiate careers in cardiovascular and stroke research while obtaining significant research results under the supervision of a sponsor or mentor." Prior to coming to Stanford, Dr. Hu completed his PhD in developmental biology at Northeast Agricultural University in China. His other accolades include 11 peer-reviewed publications and several awards, including the 2009 Young Investigator Award from the Stanford School of Medicine's Cardiovascular Institute.


Dr. Rubin Receives NCI Grant for Quantitative Imaging Research

rubin_jpg_100.gifDaniel Rubin, MD, MS, assistant professor of radiology and a member of both Bio-X and the Stanford Cancer Center, was awarded a five-year National Cancer Institute (NCI) grant to support his group's contribution to the Quantitative Imaging Network (QIN).

According to the 2010 June QUIN Newsletter (QUINNewsletter 1.pdf), the QIN Project will create the software infrastructure necessary to evaluate and adopt quantitative imaging methods in cancer clinical trials. To assist the QIN Project, Dr. Rubin and his group are "developing computational methods for quantitative assessment of tumor response to cancer therapies from images acquired in clinical trial settings, with the overall goal of facilitating assessment of treatment response and clinical decision-making." His Stanford collaborators include Edward Graves, PhD, assistant professor of radiation oncology; George Fisher, MD, PhD, associate professor of medicine-oncology; R. Brooke Jeffrey, Jr., MD, professor of radiology and chief of abdominal imaging; Andrew Quon, MD, assistant professor of radiology; and Sandy Napel, PhD, professor of radiology, co-director of both the Radiology 3D Imaging Laboratory and ISIS (Information Sciences in Imaging at Stanford). Andrew Evens, MD, assistant professor of medicine at Northwestern University, and Mia Levy, MD, assistant professor of biomedical informatics and medicine and the Cancer Clinical Informatics Officer at Vanderbilt University, are also collaborating with Dr. Rubin.

To read the full article regarding Dr. Rubin's grant award, please access "NCI Awards $3 Million Grant for Quantitative Imaging Research" or download the PDF: NCIAward.pdf. His QIN research parallels his current project for the NCI’s Cancer Biomedical Informatics Grid, which is featured in an earlier Scan Times posting: "NCI's In-Vivo Imaging Informatics Working Group (IVI-WG) Comes to Stanford (9/9 & 9/10)." Other prior articles regarding Dr. Rubin include "New Faculty Hires and Promotions: December 17, 2008" and "Awards and Honors: December 15, 2008."

Stanford Radiology Informatics Update

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Attention all Radiology Centricity RIS, Centricity PACS, RadWhere, Dictaphone Users

Beginning June 18th, Stanford Radiology Informatics is updating their on-call support contact information for the following applications: Radiology Centricity RIS, Centricity PACS, RadWhere, and dictaphone.

There is now one pager, one email, and one phone extension to address all radiology application issues. For this new contact information, please download this flyer Radiology_Informatics_New_Contact_Info.pdf to display in your area or save as a reference.

This information is also available on the radiology portal.

Note: Please continue to contact the IT Help Desk 3-3333 and/or vendor when appropriate.

Awards and Honors II: June 15, 2010

BasuChiefResident_200.jpgPat Basu, MD, MBA, attending physician, has been selected out of 1,000 applicants as a national finalist for the prestigious 2010-2011 White House Fellowship Program.

As one of twenty-five finalists, Pat will be interviewed mid-June in Washington D.C. by several high-profile individuals, including Tom Brokow and General Wesley Clark. If selected for the Program, Pat will have the opportunity "to work for a year as a full-time, paid Fellow to senior White House staff, Cabinet Secretaries, and other top-ranking government officials. Fellows also participate in an education program that includes roundtable discussions with renowned leaders from the private and public sectors, and trips to study U.S. policy in action both domestically and internationally."

Pat is a board certified radiologist who recently accepted a faculty appointment in the Department of Radiology, where he was previously a chief resident. In addition to his clinical duties, Pat's academic responsibilities include enhancing outpatient imaging operations and patient care quality as well as conducting research pertaining to healthcare costs, access, and quality. He has been invited to speak on these issues nationally and internationally. In addition, Pat serves as director of the "Health Economics, Finance, and Policy" course offered to Stanford physicians and medical students. He also directs the STARS Luncheon Program, a nonprofit designed to support lower socioeconomic children for future college and career success.

Prior to coming to Stanford, Pat served as chief resident during his intern year at Resurrection Hospital in Chicago. He graduated with honors from the University of Chicago, earning his MD and MBA degrees. While attending the University of Chicago, Pat served in the highest leadership roles as president of his business school cohort and as the representative for his medical school class on the Dean’s Council. He also led the Adolescent Substance Abuse Program. As an undergraduate, Pat attended the University of Illinois on a National Merit Scholarship, where he graduated with honors in mechanical engineering and served on the University senate.

Please access his prior blog postings "Medical Imaging: The Good, the Bad & the Ugly"; "Chief Resident Pat Basu Named Consultant of the Year"; "The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly" in Imaging: Radio Interview by Dr. Pat Basu"; "Dr. Basu Completes the 2008 J.T. Rutherford Government Relations Fellowship"; Awards and Honors II: July 15, 2008; Awards and Honors: February 2007; Awards and Honors: August 13, 2007; and "Our New Chief Residents for 2008-2009."

Awards and Honors I: June 15, 2010

RBitton[1].gif_150.gifRachel Bitton, PhD, postdoctoral scholar in the Radiological Sciences Laboratory (RSL), has been awarded a two-year California Breast Cancer Research Grant from the California Breast Cancer Research Program to fund her research on MRI-guided focused ultrasound in breast cancer treatment.

Dr. Bitton received her PhD in biomedical engineering from the University of Southern California, Los Angeles, (USC) after completing her dissertation entitled “A High Frequency Array-Based Photoacoustic Microscopy Imaging System.” As a National Cancer Institute Postdoctoral Fellow at the RSL, her research focuses on developing interventional techniques in MR image-guided high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablation using MR PRF thermometry monitoring for novel applications in breast cancer therapy at 3T, including MRgHIFU for preoperative localization of non-palpable breast tumors in place of wire localization. Dr. Bitton is also fostering new techniques in MR acoustic radiation force imaging (MR-ARFI) in the breast, and she is creating HIFU simulation models and treatment strategies in the presence of brain calcifications during MR-HIFU functional neurosurgery.

Dr. Bitton has published 12 articles and proceedings on her research. In addition to the California Breast Cancer Research Grant, she has received a 2010 International Society of Magnetic Resonance in Medicine (ISMRM) Student Stipend as well as a 2009 ISMRM New Entrant Stipend in recognition of her research. While working as a postdoctoral scholar at Stanford, Dr. Bitton also serves as a consultant with Ocubell in Palo Alto, where she is helping to design and develop an opthalmic photoacoustic imaging system for applications in retinal disease. When she is not working, she enjoys hiking, live music, and Stanford's aerial fabrics course.

Awards and Honors: June 11, 2010

Vasanawala_100.gifDr. Shreyas Vasanawala, assistant professor of radiology, received the GE Healthcare 2010 Thought Leader Award for innovation in pediatric MRI at the Annual Meeting of the International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine (ISMRM) in Stockholm, Sweden on May 7th, 2010.

Dr. Vasanawala joined the Department of Radiology faculty in July of 2007, after receiving his degree and a PhD in biophysics from Stanford University, followed by residency training in radiology at Stanford University Medical Center and a pediatric radiology fellowship at Lucile Packard Children's Hospital (LPCH). During his fellowship, Dr. Vasanawala received specialty training in pediatric musculoskeletal imaging at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center and in pediatric cardiovascular imaging at Sick Kids in Toronto. At Stanford, Dr. Vasanawala's research aims to improve magnetic resonance imaging techniques for evaluating pediatric disease.

To view Dr. Vasanawala’s prior postings, please see "In the News: Shreyas Vasanawala, MD"; "Awards and Honors II: February 19, 2010"; "Dr. Vasanawala and Colleagues Receive the Prestigious Caffey Award"; Awards and Honors: April 22, 2009; "Awards and Honors: March 23, 2009"; "Awards and Honors II: February 13, 2009"; "Awards and Honors I: July 11, 2008"; and "New Faculty Hires and Promotions: July 3, 2007."

In the News: Dr. Hovsepian Offers Leading-Edge Uterine Fibroid Embolization (UFE) Treatment

Hovsepian.gifDavid Hovsepian, MD, professor of radiology (interventional) as well as chief quality and safety officer, is featured in the Stanford Hospital & Clinics June 2010 Newsletter for his successful program to treat symptomatic uterine fibroids by embolization.

Because uterine fibroid embolization (UFE) is minimally invasive, the procedure takes about an hour under conscious sedation and most patients recover quickly, with 90% needing no further treatment. Dr. Hovsepian has performed more than 900 UFE procedures since the introduction of UFE in the United States in 1997. To read more about the treatment, please access "Treatment Options for Uterine Fibroids" in the Stanford Hospital & Clinics newsletter or download Treatment Options for Uterine Fibroids.pdf.

On May 19th, Dr. Hovsepian held a public forum on uterine fibroids, which included an address by one of his patients, as part of Stanford Hospital & Clinic's free Women’s Community Education Program. To read a description of the forum, please access "Announcements: Dr. Hovsepian to Lecture on Women's Health, May 19th." It quickly sold out, prompting a second session that was held on June 9th, which enjoyed an equally high turnout of women and spouses interested in learning more about their treatment options.


Team Canary Completes Big Sur Relay

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Left to right: Jackie, Robyn, Sondra, Carmel, and Lief.


On April 25th, Team Canary competed in the 25th Big Sur International Marathon. Led by team captain Carmel Chan, PhD, research scientist in the Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford (MIPS), the five-person team included Sondra Horn, finance manager of MIPS; her daughter, Robyn Horn, communications coordinator at Stanford Hospital & Clinics; Lief Fenno, neuroscience graduate student; and Jackie Rudd. Team Canary was sponsored by the Canary Foundation, which provided their baseball caps and shirts to raise awareness about the Foundation.

Overall, approximately 13,000 registered runners competed in the marathon and walk events, and about 1,500 (305 teams) registered for the marathon relay. Runners came from 26 countries and 49 states to compete at Big Sur with the majority (58%) coming from California. The marathon relay began at Big Sur and finished 26.2 miles later in Marathon Village, located at Highway One and Rio Road. Team Canary covered the 26.2 mile course in 4:43:51 (10:49 minutes per mile).

Awards and Honors: May 19, 2010

Roland Bammer, PhD, Patrick Barnes, MD, Samantha Holdsworth, PhD, Stefan Skare, PhD, and Kristen Yeom, MD, were awarded the John Caffey Award for Best Basic Science Research Paper at the 2010 Society for Pediatric Radiology (SPR) annual meeting for their four research papers (please see them listed below), which describe new neuro MRI imaging applications to improve the healthcare of children. The design of these new neuroimaging MR techniques was only possible because of the infrastructure created by Dr. Bammer and his whole team, including Heiko Schmiedeskamp, MS; Matus Straka, PhD; Eun Soo Choi, MS; Murat Aksoy, PhD; Daniel Kopeinigg, PhD; and Didem Aksoy, PhD. Working together, this group is developing new techniques in pulse sequencing; case analysis; fiber tracking, and perfusion. Their high-quality data is ensuring that diagnostic radiologists make the best diagnosis. By successfully securing NIH funding for their work, they have created one of the largest pediatric research programs in the United States.


Paper #: PA43: "Clinical Evaluation of Readout-Segmented-EPI for Diffusion-Weighted Imaging." Roland Bammer, PhD, Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA; Samantha J Holdsworth, PhD;Stefan Skare, PhD; Kristen Yeom, MD; Patrick D Barnes, MD

Paper #: PA48: "High-Resolution Motion-Corrected Diffusion-Tensor Imaging (DTI) in Infants." Stefan T Skare, PhD, Stanford University, Stanford, CA; Samantha J Holdsworth, PhD; Kirsten Yeom, MD; Patrick D Barnes, MD; Roland Bammer, PhD

Paper #: PA51: "3D SAP-EPI in Motion-Corrected Fast Susceptibility Weighted Imaging (SWI)." Roland Bammer, PhD, Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA; Samantha J Holdsworth, PhD; Stefan Skare, PhD; Kristen Yeom, MD; Patrick D Barnes, MD

Paper #: PA53: "T1-Weighted 3D SAP-EPI for Use in Pediatric Imaging." Roland Bammer, PhD, Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA; Samantha J Holdsworth, PhD; Stefan Skare, PhD; Kristen Yeom, MD; Patrick D Barnes, MD

Announcements: The Annotation of Images in a Semantic Web--The Challenges Ahead

On Wednesday, May 12th, from 11:00 AM to Noon, M. Scott Marshall, PhD, assistant professor of bioinformatics, will be presenting a talk entitled "The Annotation of Images in a Semantic Web--The Challenges Ahead," sponsored by ISIS (Information Sciences in Imaging at Stanford). Dr. Marshall is a faculty member in the Department of Medical Statistics and Bioinformatics at Leiden University Medical. He is also the project manager of Adaptive Information Disclosure in the Informatics Institute at the University of Amsterdam. He will be giving his talk in the Lucas Learning Center (P-083).

For more information regarding his talk, please see his abstract below or contact Danae Barnes, program manager of ISIS.

Abstract:
As steadily more structured vocabularies and ontologies are made available on the Web, attention is turning toward how to share and annotate data using these vocabularies. A new era of collaborative research is becoming possible, enabled by steadily increasing numbers of inter-linked resources. In order for these resources to add value to each other through "linking," a sustainable and common system of shared identifiers, vocabularies, and data provenance practice is required.

Announcements: The Social Neuroscience of Prosociality--From Empathy to Compassion

On May 18th at 5:30 PM-7:00 PM, Dr. Tania Singer will be giving a talk entitled "The Social Neuroscience of Prosociality: From Empathy to Compassion" in Building 320, Room 105. This talk is sponsored by the Center for Compassion and Altruism Research and Education in the Stanford School of Medicine.

Dr. Singer holds the inaugural chair of Social Neuroscience and Neuroeconomics at the University of Zurich, and is also the director of the Department of Social Neuroscience at the Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences in Leipzig, Germany. Her research centers on human social behavior and uses an interdisciplinary approach combining theories, paradigms, and techniques from a variety of disciplines including neuroscience; developmental and social psychology; and economics. No admission fee is required.

For directions to the conference location, please access: http://campus-map.stanford.edu/index.cfm?ID=01-320. If you have questions, please contact Thi V.A. Thach.

The Launching of RadWhere Phase 3

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Over the last two months, we have launched phase three of our speech recognition program at Stanford Medicine Imaging Center, Redwood City, and Blake Wilbur, as well as for MSK at Stanford Hospital & Clinics. To read more about phase three of our speech recognition program and a few initial responses from physicians, please access our RadWhere Newsletter. For our prior blog announcement, please see "Speech Recognition Coming Soon to Stanford Medicine Imaging Center."

Announcements: Dr. Hovsepian to Lecture on Women's Health, May 19th

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On May 19th from 6:30 PM to 8:00 PM, David Hovsepian, MD, professor of radiology as well as chief quality and safety officer, will deliver a lecture on Uterine Fibroids as part of Stanford Hospital & Clinic's free Women’s Community Education Program. Attendees will learn about the treatment options available to women who suffer from uterine fibroids and will meet one of the Hospital's patients. Dr. Hovsepian's lecture will be held on campus in the Alway Class Room M106 (at 300 Pasteur Drive). Please register for the talk, as seating is limited, by calling 650.498.6022. For more information, please download our flyer UterineFibroids.pdf.

Celebrating Our Nurses: “Caring Today for a Healthier Tomorrow”

Each year during National Nurses Week, we honor our radiologic nurses at Stanford Hospital & Clinics for their dedication to our patients and their contributions to health care. In recognition of the 3.1 million registered nurses throughout the United States, the American Nurses Association (ANA) has selected “Nurses: Caring Today for a Healthier Tomorrow” as this year’s theme for National Nurses Week, which begins on Thursday, May 6th, (known as RN Recognition Day) and ends on Wednesday, May 12th, which is the birthday of Florence Nightingale who founded the nursing profession.

According to the American Nurses Association, “National Nurses Week is devoted to highlighting the diverse ways in which registered nurses, the largest health care profession, are working to improve health care. From bedside nursing in hospitals and long-term care facilities to the halls of research institutions, state legislatures, and Congress, the depth and breadth of the nursing profession is meeting the expanding health care needs of American society.”

For more information on the history and significance of National Nurses Week,
please access the American Nurses Association Website. Please also see “National Nurses Week, May 6-12, 2009, ‘Nurses: Building a Healthy America" for our 2009 blog article on National Nurses Week.

Administrative Professional Week, April 19th-23rd

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During Administrative Professional Week, our Department honored our administrative staff, beginning with a special breakfast served by our faculty and senior staff at NeXus Cafe. On Tuesday, supervisors showed their appreciation for their staff in their own chosen way. "Administrative Day Surprise" was on Wednesday, which is officially known as Administrative Professional Day. "Resource Thursday" was a day for questions and answers. By visiting Grant S-084, staff could find answers to their questions about the ergonomical correctness of their workplaces; the use STAP and STRP Funds; and the purpose of the Work Life Center. AdminWeek_9_350.gif The "Guess That Baby?" contest ran throughout the week. Staff submitted baby pictures of themselves between the ages of newborn to five-years old, and everyone tried to guess which . . .

. . . staff member had submitted which photo! Our best guessers were Malwana Adalat and Mary Troyer, who tied by guessing who that baby was in 8 out of 10 baby photos!

The Grand Finale of our Administrative Professional Week was on “1980s Flashback Friday” at the staff luncheon from noon to 2:30 PM in the Nurse’s Administration Courtyard. AdminWeek_18_350.gif
Our Human Resources & VP Manager Deitria Chapman, along with HR Administrator Kim Ko and Administrative Associate Roni Brown, encouraged participation on Flashback Friday: "Radical, dudes and dudettes! Time to take a chill pill on Friday and dig out your mad 80s duds – think leg warmers, Reebok hightops, shoulder pads, neon colors, big hair, blue eyeshadow, paint splattered clothes, stirrup pants, crimped hair . . . if it was big and loud, we did it in the 80s! AdminWeek80s-Flashback_350.gifMaybe you’ll want to channel your inner Olivia Newton John, Madonna, Michael Jackson, or a big-haired metal band like Poison? Or maybe you’ll rock the Members Only jacket, skinny tie, or acid-washed jeans? Flashdance or Footloose, anyone?" Those whose 80s' outfits took us back 20 or 30 years won prizes! The winners of our 80s Costume Contest were Patricia Raines and Teresa Newton. Please see photos from our week below.

BREAKFAST
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LUNCH

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Our New Residents for 2010!

We are delighted to welcome our wonderful nine new residents, who will begin this July 2010! Please find some of their photos and short bios below.

Mike Cutalo, MD
Radhika Dave, MD
John Downey, MD, MPH
Gregory Havlena, MD
Bobby Jones, MD
Paul Laeske, MD, PhD
Irene Liu, MD, PhD
Connie Montgomery, MD
Russell Stewart, MD, MBA

Mike Cutalo, MD
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Mike was born and raised in suburban New Jersey, but eventually headed west to attend Stanford as an undergraduate. Although his parents hoped he would major in computer science or economics, he ended up double majoring in human biology and drama. After graduation, he traveled to Nepal and spent six months working at Kanti Children's Hospital. Mike then made the move back to the East Coast to attend medical school at Columbia University's College of Physicians and Surgeons before slowly drifting back westward to Chicago for his internship year. Mike describes himself as "a self-professed computer nerd who has never met a pizza he didn't like with a tendency to quote movies--a lot." Mike and his fiancée, Ellen (also a Stanford alum), are very excited to be moving back to the Bay Area.

Radhika Dave, MD
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Radhika, also known as Rad by her friends (yes, radiology was inevitable), grew up outside of Chicago. She attended Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology where she received a degree in chemical engineering and attended Indiana University School of Medicine prior to moving to California for her transitional internship in San Diego. Rad enjoys traveling, yoga, scuba diving, hiking, dancing, and running (she ran two half-marathons during her intern year in San Diego). She is excited to start residency at Stanford and explore the Bay area.

John Downey, MD, MPH
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John grew up in a small town in rural Connecticut and went to Amherst College (in a small town in rural Massachusetts). He majored in music and biology, writing a thesis in musical composition. Following graduation, he served as assistant director of the Amherst Symphony Orchestra and is still active in music. While at Stanford, John completed his master’s degree in public health at the University of California, Berkeley, where his thesis focused on preventable medical errors. Having finished his transitional year internship at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York City, John is excited to return to Stanford for radiology. He enjoys cooking, hiking, running, and music.

Bobby Jones, MD
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Bobby (who goes by many nicknames) was born in Chicago but didn't like the cold, so he moved to St. Louis for the better weather when he was two. Never a Midwesterner at heart, he went to Duke (a few years later) and studied the Classics and tennis. Duke captivated him, and he stayed for medical school where he was engaged in research focusing on radiation reduction in pediatric CT. Part of this research was spent on the tennis court. He got the wanderlust late in medical school and took a year of leave to teach biology, Latin, as well as coach tennis and football (the real kind) at St. Paul's School in London. Bobby claims that living 10 feet from the grass courts at the School was the greatest achievement in his life. He is now at the tail end of his transitional internship in Roanoke, Virginia, and has not disappeared yet.

Paul Laeske, MD, PhD
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Paul received his BS (in bioengineering), MD, and PhD (in bioengineering) from the University of Wisconsin, Madison. He also took his first breaths in Madison, Wisconsin, which is his birthplace. In addition to pursuing his research interests in thermal tissue ablation, medical imaging, and image-guided cancer therapies, Paul is the co-founder and partner of NeuWave Medical Inc. (formerly Micrablate, LLC), which is a company founded to develop and market electromagnetic medical devices. If you watched the Ironman Triathlon World Championship in 2005, you may have seen him competing in Kailua-Kona, Hawaii, or if you attended the 2006 Lakefront Marathon in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, you may have seen him accepting the winning medal!

Connie Montgomery, MD
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Connie grew up in southern California. After obtaining her undergraduate degree from Stanford, she left laid-back California for New York City, where she pursued her medical training at Cornell Medical School. While in medical school, Connie was active in her class serving as class president and volunteering for multiple student organizations, but she found herself missing sunny California. Consequently, she is ecstatic about returning to Stanford for residency. Connie looks forward to spending time and cooking with her sister (who is currently a medical student at Stanford); working on her tennis game; and cheering on the Stanford Cardinal.

Russell Stewart, MD, MBA
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Although his hometown is Seattle, Washington, Russell has spent enough time at Stanford to call it home as well. After completing his MS and BS in biology at Stanford University, Russell attended the University of Chicago where he received his MD and MBA. He is excited to return to the Farm for his residency. Some of Russell’s hobbies include quoting famous pirates, collecting antique dolls, and wearing capes.

To see prior postings on our blog welcoming new residents, please access
http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2009/08/new-residents-f.html and http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2008/06/welcome_new_res.html.

In the News: Stanford's Neuroradiology Fellowship Program Ranked First in the U.S.

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Co-directed by Section Chief Scott Atlas, MD, and Associate Professor Huy Do, MD, our Neuroradiology Fellowship Program has just been ranked first out of all 77 accredited neuroradiology programs in the United States by the American Board of Radiology (ABR). Our Fellowship Program’s first place ranking is featured in the April 2010 issue of Inside Stanford Medicine, which also states that "[a] letter from the ABR in March noted Stanford trainees’ exceptional performance over the past five years on qualification examinations." To read the full announcement, please access http://med.stanford.edu/ism/people/.


Dr. Geoff Rubin Presents "Inside Out" Through Stanford Mini Med School

As a lecturer in the winter quarter Stanford Mini Med School, Geoff Rubin, MD, provided an introduction to various imaging modalities in his presentation, "Inside Out: How Imaging Technology Offers a Portal to Human Anatomy and Disease," which is now available as an online video at http://med.stanford.edu/minimed/winter/. The lectures offered through the Stanford Mini Med School during the winter quarter were part of their "Medicine, Human Health and the Frontiers of Science" series.


Awards and Honors: April 26, 2010

HsiaoAlbert2010_150.jpgAlbert Hsiao, MD, PhD, received the John Kirkpatrick Young Investigator Award for the best scientific research paper presented by a resident or fellow for his article, “Volumetric Flow Assessment in Congenital Heart Disease with 4D Flow MRI," developed in collaboration with Marcus Alley, PhD; Payam Massaband, MD; Robert J. Herfkens, MD; Frandics P. Chan, MD, PhD; and Dr. Shreyas Vasanawala. Dr. Hsiao's research promises to translate quickly into the clinical environment for imaging children with cardiovascular disease.

Dr. Hsiao studied biology, computer science, and engineering at Caltech as an undergraduate and returned home for medical school at the University of California, San Diego, where he completed a PhD program in bioengineering with an emphasis in bioinformatics. After completing a year of general surgery internship at Stanford, he joined our Department as a first-year resident in 2008. Now in his second year of our Residency Program, Dr. Hsiao works primarily with Drs. Vasanawala, Chan, and Herfkens to develop practical clinical applications for 4D flow MRI. In their evaluations of patients in clinical practice so far, their results show that the 4D flow technique they have developed is more precise than conventional phase-contrast in quantifying flow. These results are of particular significance because the 4D flow technique can provide much more information about overall blood flow in the heart and lungs than conventional methods.

When he's not working, Dr. Hsiao enjoys training in martial arts and playing tennis. For his prior blog posting, please see "Welcome New Residents."

Celebrating 5 Years: Maureen Wong

Wong_original.jpgMaureen Wong, joined the Radiology Department in August 2004 as the radiology billing supervisor. She was recently promoted to her current position as ancillary billing supervisor for Stanford Hospital & Clinics at north campus, where she manages a group of billers and coders from Radiology and Pathology. Her group is responsible for assigning ICD-9 codes to radiology exams for professional fee billing; using EPIC to resolve issues related to pre-billing and denials by payers; and for providing pricing information to outside referral sources as well as patients. Throughout her five years, Ms. Wong has completed several supervisory trainings, and she recently obtained her Certified Professional Coder (CPC) certification. When asked to describe what she found most enjoyable about her work at Stanford, she stated that the “best part about working here is the people! I have a great team of billers and coders who work together very cohesively to get the job done. They make my job as a supervisor very pleasant.” In her free time, she enjoys health and fitness activities; movies; reading; and spending time with her husband and two children. In the fall, her daughter will begin her first year of college, and her son will begin high school.

2010 SPR: Stanford Pediatric Radiology Remains Unparalleled

By Richard Barth, MD

Barth_0051-2.jpgI am pleased to communicate the extraordinary recognition of our evolving Pediatric Radiology Program at the 2010 Annual Meeting of the Society for Pediatric Radiology (SPR) held in Boston, MA, from April 13th-17th.

Each year at the SPR, the highly coveted and prestigious Caffey Award is given in recognition of the best scientific research paper to advance the care of children using imaging. This year's Caffey was bestowed upon Roland Bammer, PhD, and colleagues Samantha Holdsworth, PhD; Stefan Skare, PhD; Kristen Yeom, MD; and Patrick Barnes, MD, for four research papers, which describe new neuro MRI imaging applications to benefit the care of children.

Also, Albert Hsiao, MD, PhD, received the John Kirkpatrick Young Investigator Award for the best scientific research paper presented by a trainee for his work on. . .

volumetric flow assessment in congenital heart disease, in collaboration with Marcus Alley, PhD; Payam Massaband, MD; Robert J. Herfkens, MD; Frandics P. Chan, MD, PhD; and Dr. Shreyas Vasanawala. Dr. Hsiao's research promises to translate quickly into the clinical environment for imaging children with cardiovascular disease. (For the titles of the winning articles by Drs. Bammer and Hsiao, please see the 2010 SPR Presentation list below.)

Presenting a multitude of papers, our absolute contributions to the meeting were exceptional, especially considering the relatively small size of our Program (please see the 2010 SPR Presentation and Poster lists from Lucile Packard Children's Hospital below). To the best of my knowledge, the recognition of four papers from one institution and the receipt of the two major SPR awards—the Caffey and the Kirkpatrick—by one institution in a single year are highly unusual and unprecedented.

Other noteworthy honors for our Program included the election of Dr. Beverley Newman to the prestigious Nominating Committee of the SPR, which is a clear testimonial to the national stature of her leadership in pediatric radiology.

I was personally honored by receiving this year's Presidential Recognition Award from the Society for Pediatric Radiology. I was also elected second vice president of the SPR, and I am next in line to serve as president in 2013. I could not have accomplished this without the tremendous support of all of my colleagues at Stanford and Lucile Packard Children's Hospital--thank you! I am confident that our work in imaging will substantially improve the care of children, and I am very optimistic regarding the future opportunities for our Program.

I am proud and grateful to all of the members of our Program, who have worked hard as a team to enable these achievements. To read about Stanford Pediatric Radiology and the 2009 SPR, please see “Stanford Pediatric Radiology Excels at the Annual Society for Pediatric Radiology (SPR) Meeting."


2010 CAFFEY AWARD – LIST OF SCIENTIFIC PAPERS
"Clinical Evaluation of Readout-Segmented-EPI for Diffusion-Weighted
Imaging" (Roland Bammer, PhD; Samantha J. Holdsworth, PhD; Stefan Skare,
PhD; Kristen Yeom, MD; Patrick D. Barnes, MD)

"High-Resolution Motion-Corrected Diffusion-Tensor Imaging (DTI) in
Infants" (Stefan T. Skare, PhD; Samantha J. Holdsworth, PhD; Kirsten Yeom,
MD; Patrick D. Barnes, MD; Roland Bammer, PhD)

"3D SAP-EPI in Motion-Corrected Fast Susceptibility Weighted Imaging
(SWI)" (Roland Bammer, PhD; Samantha J. Holdsworth, PhD; Stefan Skare,
PhD; Kristen Yeom, MD; Patrick D. Barnes, MD)

"T1-Weighted 3D SAP-EPI for Use in Pediatric Imaging" (Roland Bammer,
PhD; Samantha J. Holdsworth, PhD; Stefan Skare, PhD; Kristen Yeom, MD;
Patrick D. Barnes, MD)

JOHN KIRKPATRICK YOUNG INVESTIGATOR AWARD
“Volumetric Flow Assessment in Congenital Heart Disease with 4D Flow MRI”
(Albert Hsiao, MD; Marcus T. Alley, PhD; Payam Massaband, MD; Robert J. Herfkens, MD; Frandics P. Chan, MD, PhD; Shreyas S. Vasanawala, MD, PhD)

2010 SPR PRESENTATION LIST
“MRI of the Distal Fetal Colon, the Key to Detecting Fetal
Gastrointestinal Abnormalities” – Presented by James R. Gilmore, MD,
Pediatric Fellow; Erika Rubesova MD; and Richard A. Barth MD

“Congenital Lobar Overinflation (CLO)/Congenital Lobar Emphysema (CLE)
–Is Non Surgical Management Feasible?” – Presented by Richard Barth MD;
Beverley Newman MD; Erika Rubesova MD; Shreyas Vasanawala MD, PhD; Karl
Sylvester MD; and Claudia Mueller MD, PhD

“Prenatal Diagnosis of Renal Dysplasia: What Is the Value of Fetal MRI?”
– Presented by Erika Rubesova MD; Susan R. Hintz MD, PhD; and Richard A. Barth MD

"Automated Eddy Current Correction for Phase Contrast Flow
Quantifications in Congenital Heart Disease" – Presented by Payam
Massaband MD, MSK Fellow; Marcus T. Alley PhD; Thomas Brosnan PhD; Albert
Hsiao MD; Frandics P. Chan, MD, PhD; Shreyas Vasanawala MD, PhD

“Improved Normal Value for LV Mass for Assessing the Adequacy of LV
Training after Pulmonary Artery Banding” – Presented by Raghav Raman MD,
Cardiovascular Fellow; Beverley Newman MD; Shreyas Vasanawala MD, PhD;
Sunil Malhotra MD; and Frank Hanley MD

“Follow-Up Skeletal Surveys for Suspected Non-Accidental Trauma: Can a
More limited Survey be Performed without Compromising Diagnostic
Information?” – Presented by Arvind Sonik MD, Pediatric Fellow; Rebecca
Stein-Wexler MD; Kristen K. Rogers PhD; Kevin P. Coulter MD; and Sandra L. Wootton-Gorges, MD

“Hyperpolarized [1-13C]—Pyruvate Metabolic Imaging: Measurement of
Disease Activity and Treatment Response in a Rat Model of Juvenile
Idiopathic Arthritis” – Presented by John D. MacKenzie MD; Yi-Fen Yen
PhD; Dirk Mayer PhD; and Daniel M. Spielman

“Comparison of Different Methods of Calculating CT Radiation Dose in
Children” – Presented by Beverley Newman MD; Arundhiti Ganguly PhD; and
Jee-eun Kim MD

“Analysis of a Technique for Radiation Dose Reduction in CT Guided
Musculoskeletal Procedures” – Presented by John D. MacKenzie MD; James R.
Gilmore MD; and Arvind Sonik MD

“Volumetric T12 Weighted MR Axial Reconstructions of the Liver Versus
Routine AxialT2 Images in Pediatric Patients” – Presented by Arvind
Sonik, MD, Pediatric Fellow; Moritz Kircher MD, PhD; Peng Lai PhD; Anja
C. Brau PhD; and Shreyas Vasanawala MD, PhD

“MRI of the Liver: ‘How to Do It’” — Presented by Shreyas S. Vasanawala,
MD, PhD

“Imaging with Orthopedic Hardware: How I Optimize My 3D CT and MRI
Musculoskeletal Protocols?” – Presented by John D. MacKenzie, MD

“Computer Aided Detection for Pediatric Thoracic Disorders: What Would
Dr. Caffey Think?” – Presented by Beverley Newman, MD

2010 SPR SCIENTIFIC POSTERS
“3D-Image Guided Surgical Planning for Complex Ventricular Outlet
Anomalies” - Presented by Arvind Sonik MD, Pediatric Fellow; Shreyas
Vasanawala MD, PhD; Beverley Newman MD; and Frandics P. Chan, MD, PhD

“Congenital Bronchopulmonary Malformations: What Can We Learn from Fetal
MRI?” – Presented by Erika Rubesova, MD; Richard A. Barth MD; and Beverley Newman MD

Awards and Honors: April 21, 2010

Ware_0118-72.jpgNancy Ware, ARRT (CT), has received one of two FY 2010 “Most Productive Technologist Awards” from the Stanford 3D Laboratory. Ms. Ware grew up in Redwood City, California, and graduated from Canada College. Before coming to our Department, she worked as the lead CT technologist at Alexian Brothers Hospital for 25 years. In March of 2008, she joined our 3D Laboratory. Outside of work, she enjoys bicycling, traveling, and hiking.

Announcements: The History of Lasers at Stanford

The Stanford Historical Society is holding its 34th Annual Meeting & Reception on Tuesday, May 25th, from 4:15 – 6:45 PM at Cubberley Auditorium (485 Lasuen Mall, Stanford University). Professor Robert L. Byer, the William R. Kenan, Jr. Professor of Applied Physics, will be presenting a special guest presentation on "The History of Lasers at Stanford." A reception will follow. Please RSVP (YES only) by Friday, May 14, 2010, to stanfordhist@stanford.edu or 650-725-3332.

For a description of the talk, please download Annual meeting-May 25 2010.pdf.

New Chief Residents for 2010: Stacey Keel, MD, and Anobel Tamrazi, MD, PhD

Stacey Keel, MD, and Anobel Tamrazi, MD, PhD, our two new chief residents, will begin their duties in July of 2010.


a tamrazi.jpgAnobel Tamrazi is a local resident from the Bay Area. After attending San Jose State University, Anobel entered the Medical Scholar's Program at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign where he received his PhD in chemistry and his MD degree. As a chief resident in radiology, Anobel would like to work closely with both residents and attendings to maintain and continue to improve our outstanding residency program. Specifically, he would like to help improve communication between various medical subspecialties and the Radiology Department to increase the clinical utility of various imaging modalities.

Awards and Honors: April 19, 2010

Sandra Rodriguez_2009.jpgSandra Rodriguez, BS R(RT)(MR), MR research technologist, has received the Professional Advancement Scholarship from the American Society of Radiologic Technologists (ASRT) Education and Research Foundation. According to the website, the ASRT is "committed to advancing the radiologic sciences and promoting the professionalism of radiologic technologists." The Professional Advancement Scholarship is awarded to radiologic technologists to assist them in completing an undergraduate or graduate degree in the radiologic sciences.

Ms. Rodriguez earned her Bachelor of Science in Health Administration (BSHA) in an online program through the University of Phoenix in September of 2008. She is currently enrolled in the Master's Program in Health Administration and will receive her degree in November 2010. As an MRI technologist at the Lucas Center, Ms. Rodriguez helps users set-up for their studies and facilitates their scans, providing support whenever necessary. She also does quality assurance on our three scanners and makes sure they are running smoothly. In her free time, Ms. Rodriguez enjoys cardio kickboxing; reading; and trying to keep up with a teenage girl (her daughter).

For her prior awards listings, please access Awards and Honors: February 19, 2010; Awards and Honors: August 11, 2009; and Awards and Honors: April 9, 2008.

People and Their Pets: Chloee and Daisy

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Chloee (on the left) is Daisy's new little sister.

By Sheila Galuppo, marketing manager for outpatient imaging at Stanford Hospital and Clinics

I adopted Chloee back in October 2009 from the Golden Gate Basset Rescue (GGBR). Chloee's prior family had to make a very difficult choice: surrendering her when they fell on economic and personal hard times. It is never an easy decision to give up a loved family pet. Their only relief was knowing that the GGBR would find Chloee a good home. I was what GGBR calls a "foster failure." After one day of fostering, I knew we had a new family member. I already had one Basset Hound, Daisy, whom I rescued from the Humane Society when she was four-months old. She was surrendered by a young couple who could not spend enough time with her. The girls were a quickly bonded pair, and I too was attached to Chloee.

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Chloee and Daisy in the Easter weekend "Bunnies and Bonnet Parade" with 25 other Bassets.

I try to provide the former family with videos and pictures on Facebook to show how beautifully Chloee has grown into a confident, playful, and socialized Basset Hound. I was told that Chloee NEVER BARKED. By November, she learned how to bark and travel in a pack as Bassets love to do.

Golden Gate Basset Rescue is not-for-profit organization that rescues unwanted Basset Hounds in need of good homes. Click here to learn more about Golden Gate Basset Rescue at http://www.ggbassetrescue.org/.

To read about Daisy's adoption, please access "People and Their Pets: Daisy."

Announcements: Dr. Hovsepian to Lecture on Women's Health May 19th

On May 19th from 6:30 PM to 8:00 PM, David Hovsepian, MD, professor of radiology as well as chief quality and safety officer, will deliver a lecture on Uterine Fibroids as part of Stanford Hospital & Clinic's free Women’s Community Education Program. Attendees will learn about the treatment options available to women who suffer from uterine fibroids and will meet one of the Hospital's patients. Dr. Hovsepian's lecture will be held on campus in the Alway Class Room M106 (at 300 Pasteur Drive). Please register for the talk, as seating is limited, by calling 650.498.6022. For more information, please download our flyer UterineFibroids.pdf.

Awards and Honors: April 7, 2010

Soriano_James_150.jpgJames Soriano, RT, (R) (CT), is a registered CT technologist, and our most recent recipient of the Wingspread Award. He came to Stanford in 2005 and worked as a diagnostic radiology technologist. Within a year, he transferred to the CT Department for cross training, where he now works as a full-time CT technologist. James received the Wingspread Award because of his excellence in Radiology. Bestowed upon James by the former recipient, Audrey Strain, RT (R) (CT), the Wingspread Award gives employees the opportunity to recognize who among them has gone above and beyond the fulfillment of his or her usual duties in patient care, job performance, versatility, and work ethics. Wingspread awardees can keep the award for as long as they wish or until they discover another "special performer."

Before coming to Stanford, James worked as a traveling radiologic technologist at different trauma hospitals in the country. He earned his associate of science degree in medical imaging from Long Beach City College in 2002, graduating as the "Student of the Year" in his class. He completed his bachelor of science degree in medical imaging from Grand Canyon University in 2009 and will be participating in the commencement ceremony this May in Phoenix, Arizona.

When asked what he likes about his work, James described his experience as
follows: "The opportunities here are endless. Stanford Hospital gives everyone lots of opportunities to grow and advance in their careers. There are so many avenues here that we can venture into and still continue to learn."

In his free time, James participates annually in different charitable organizations. He runs 20 miles per week and is actively involved with the San Francisco and Los Angeles AIDS Walk; the Lance Armstrong Cancer Foundation; as well as the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society. James is currently training for an annual half marathon that he will be participating in later this year.

Celebrating 5 Years of Service: David Dick, PhD

Dick_David_0183A-72.jpgDavid Dick, PhD, has served as the head of Cyclotron Physics since 2004. In the Cyclotron Suite, his responsibilities include maintaining the GE PETtrace cyclotron and the Rotem MediSmarts radiation monitoring system; assisting in writing National Institutes of Health (NIH) grant proposals; supervising two production radiochemists; and providing guidance to numerous radiochemistry users in the facility. Dr. Dick also oversaw the installation of Cyclotron Suite equipment and the installation/commissioning of the GE PETtrace cyclotron; developed CGMP-compliant procedures for the synthesis of [18F]-FDG, [18F]-NaF, and [13N]-NH3; and participated in two routine inspections of the [18F]-FDG production facility performed by the Food & Drug Administration at Stanford University. He is . . .

also experienced with GE TRACERlab FX-C Pro, FX-FDG, FX-FE, FX-FN, MX-FDG, and FASTlab synthesis modules for automated and/or semi-automated synthesis of C-11 and F-18 labeled radiotracers.

In addition, Dr. Dick serves on several University committees, including the Stanford University Non Human-Use Radiation Safety Committee and the Stanford University Administrative Panel on Radiological Safety. He is also the chair of the Society of Nuclear Medicine Clinical Trials Network CGMP Audit Task Force, and he has published 7 refereed articles and 15 abstracts.

Prior to coming to Stanford, Dr. Dick was a research assistant at the University of Wisconsin-Madison Cyclotron Facility. He received his BS in physics from Western Washington University, and his MS and PhD in medical physics from the University of Wisconsin, Madison.

To read more about Stanford Staff who are celebrating work anniversaries, please access the "Employee Recognition" website.

Celebrating 15 Years of Service: Marcus Alley, PhD

alleym_sm_100.gifMarcus Alley, PhD, senior research scientist, began at Stanford Radiology in 1994 as a postdoctoral fellow, mentored by Dr. Norbert Pelc. After completing his postdoctoral fellowship in 1997, Dr. Alley worked as an MR applications and software developer in Radiology, and, in May of 2005, he became a senior research scientist in our Department. His current research involves developing MRI with compressed sensing for body and pediatric imaging.

Dr. Alley received his BA in physics from Reed College in Portland, Oregon, and his MS (physics) and PhD (nuclear physics) from the University of Wisconsin, Madison, where he completed his thesis entitled "An Effective Range Determination of Phase Shifts for the Elastic Proton Helium-3 Reaction between the Energies of 0 and 12 MeV."

His past awards include the Caffey Award for his Outstanding Basic Science Paper, “Faster Pediatric MRI Via Compressed Sensing," at the Fifty-Second Annual Meeting in 2009 of the Society for Pediatric Radiology, and the Lauterbur Award in MR for his paper, “Faster Pediatric MRI With Compressed Sensing," from the Society of Computed Body Tomography and Magnetic Resonance (SCBT/MR) in 2009. Dr. Alley also has 44 publications and 7 patents.

To read more about Stanford Staff who are celebrating work anniversaries, please access the "Employee Recognition" website.


Research Associateship Programs

The National Research Council (NRC) of the National Academies is sponsoring awards for graduate, postdoctoral, and senior researchers at federal laboratories and affiliated institutions.

For more information about how to apply online and a list of participating laboratories, please access the NRC Research Associateship Programs web site at:
www.national-academies.org/rap.

Celebrating 5 Years of Service: Billie Robles

Billie_Robles.jpgBillie Robles has been the program manager of the Center for Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence Focused on Therapy Response (CCNE-TR) within the Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford (MIPS) since November 2006. From 2004 to 2005, she assisted in the preparation of two research center grants for the Director of the MIPS Program, Sanjiv Sam Gambhir, MD, PhD, Virginia & D.K. Ludwig Professor of Radiology & Bioengineering; chief of the Nuclear Medicine Division; and director of the Canary Center for Cancer Early Detection. Both grants were successful, providing funding for the Center for Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence Focused on Therapy Response (CCNE-TR) and the In Vivo Cellular and Molecular Imaging Center (ICMIC) at Stanford. Mrs. Robles also helped submit an Investigational New Drug-Food & Drug Administration (IND-FDA) application for a tracer, which has been approved by the FDA.

In addition, she works closely with the CCNE-TR Deputy Director on all CCNE-TR related tasks, such as upgrading the CCNE-TR website to the new interactive site and updating its content. She also coordinates all the administrative tasks for . . .

both Center grants (CCNE-TR and ICMIC), which include organizing monthly seminars (e.g., the Nanobiotechnology Seminar); following up with the sponsoring agency director regarding inquiries; attending monthly and quarterly meetings; as well as taking minutes and uploading them to the National Cancer Institute (NCI)'s Alliance for Nanotechnology in Cancer intranet, which is a technology initiative that “works in concert with other NCI advanced technology initiatives to provide the scientific foundation and team science that is required to transform cancer research and care.”

In addition, Mrs. Robles provides updates on the NCI Alliance intranet while acting as a liaison between the NCI Alliance group and the Stanford CCNE-TR. Her other duties include coordinating CCNE-TR annual retreats and annual symposiums; initiating annual sub-awards via Oracle and following through with the Office of Sponsored Research (OSR); working with the Research Management Group (RMG) on annual progress reports; initiating and renewing Institutional Review Board (IRB) protocol applications; creating and editing presentation materials for conferences; coordinating review of manuscripts; collaborating with consortia group on all expenses (invoices) to be paid; and working with the finance team to streamline grant accounts.

Prior to rejoining MIPS in 2006, Ms Robles worked in the Pathology Department in 2005 as an administrative assistant to three clinical faculty members, where she coordinated resident case conferences; maintained legal consultation regarding pathology cases for faculty; and edited/reviewed faculty manuscripts.

To read more about Stanford Staff who are celebrating work anniversaries, please access the "Employee Recognition" website.

Celebrating 25 Years of Service: Susan Singh

susan_singh.jpgSusan Singh, administrative associate, first came to Stanford in 1984 and began working in the Division of Geriatrics in the Department of Medicine as an admistrative assistant. Her initial duties included preparing manuscripts and grants; ordering lab supplies; and performing miscellaneous office duties, such as typing manuscripts from the faculty members' handwritten scripts.

Until 2004, Ms. Singh continued to work in the Department of Medicine, moving to different Divisions and acquiring new skills. From 1989 to 1990, she joined the . . .

Division of Microbiology/Immunology and was promoted to administrative associate where she helped with faculty affairs by coordinating hiring, faculty appointments, and assisting the chair. Next, she moved to the Division of Infectious Diseases, preparing manuscripts, assisting in grant preparation, and other general administrative duties from 1990 to 1995. The last two Divisions in the Department of Medicine in which she worked were Hematology (1995-1997) and Nephrology (1997-1999), where her duties included transcription; transcribing; and patient billing and scheduling. From 1999 to 2004, she went back to the Division of Microbiology/Immunology after being promoted.

In 2004, Ms. Singh came to the Department of Radiology, where her title has remained the same, but her responsibilities have grown. She now helps facilitate the appointments of postdoctoral fellows and visiting scholars; processes visas; coordinates the Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford (MIPS) seminar; and supports two laboratories.

After 25 years of experience, Ms. Singh has refined her customer service skills as well as her ability to be a valuable member of a team. She used her skills as a member of the winning team at the 2007 Radiology Staff Retreat in which staff teams had to work together to solve complicated puzzles to win. Ms. Singh characterized her Stanford experience as follows: "I have been very fortunate that I have met the best people and enjoyed working with them. My bosses and supervisors are the best.The other great thing about working at Stanford is that we are constantly learning new things." In addition to enjoying her work, Ms. Singh likes music (she's trying to improve her singing); dancing; traveling; and spending time with her grandbaby.

To read more about Stanford Staff, please access the "Employee Recognition" website.

Celebrating 5 Years of Service: Gaelen Lombard

Gaelen_Work_Image_150.jpgGaelen Lombard, Radiology educational outreach assistant conference coordinator, has served Stanford Radiology since April 2004.

She described her five years at Stanford as follows:
"I am coming up on my five-year anniversary in the Department of Radiology. Amazing how time flies. I came over here from the Lane Medical Library. I grew up with Stanford in my backyard and the School of Medicine has been home to me for quite a while. Getting a job in Radiology was a very important and positive step in my life. I have enjoyed the work we have done for the Continuing Medical Education Program (CME), and I valued the people I work with and have come to know--from my colleagues to other faculty and staff in the Department who cross my path in the course of my job. I feel privileged to work in a Department that (rightly so) has so much to be proud of in terms of its accomplishments and efforts.

In my very first months on the job I noticed what a positive environment I had entered into, and the high value people place on each other and the work we do. Because I work on California Avenue, not many people may be aware of me or my role in the Department. I came to Radiology to be the main registrar for the CME group. I have since transitioned into the role of speaker and accreditation coordinator, webmaster, and brochure developer. My areas of knowledge and expertise include Oracle Financials, Certain Registration, Dreamweaver, Photoshop, Microsoft, and Adobe applications."

To read more about Stanford Staff, please access the "Employee Recognition" website.

Awards and Honors: April 5, 2010

Andrew_Lee_Profile_Picture_150.jpgAndrew Lee, Stanford medical student in the Cardiovascular Gene and Cell Therapy Laboratory, was awarded a Research Medical Student Grant by the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) for this coming summer. This grant is designed to help medical students increase their "research experience in medical imaging and to encourage them to consider academic radiology as an important option for their future." Mr. Lee will use his RSNA grant award to support his research using

PET/CT to investigate the fate of human cardiac progenitor cells following their delivery into the ischemic myocardium of an animal model.

As an undergraduate at Yale University, Mr. Lee conducted research on measuring indices of asynchrony in the left ventricular myocardial contraction of patients in heart failure using cardiac MRI. After graduating with a BS in East Asian Studies and biology, he entered medical school at Stanford University, hoping to learn about alternative therapies for treating ischemic heart disease. Currently in his third year, Mr. Lee is working with Dr. Joseph Wu to use noninvasive molecular imaging to monitor cell engraftment and survival following therapeutic delivery to the heart. In the future, he hopes to employ the imaging technologies he is helping to develop in human clinical stem cell trials. Andrew's other research interests include collaborations with the Longaker laboratory on developing novel methods of reprogramming adipose tissue to become pluriopotent stem cells without the use of lentiviral vectors.

In the past, Mr. Lee's research has been supported by the Stanford Medical Scholars Research Program and the American Heart Association. He is currently supported by the Howard Hughes Medical Institution. He has published over 10 peer reviewed journal articles in the past 2 years. His other activities include volunteering at the Stanford Medical School Pacific Free Clinic (PFC), where he was a former manager.

Stanford IR Research Honored at SIR

Led by Section Chief Lawrence “Rusty” Hofmann, MD, the Interventional Section made a major impact at the 35th Annual Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) Scientific Meeting, "IR Innovation," March 13-18, 2010, in Tampa, Florida. Presenting 22 research abstracts, plenary lectures, and workshops, our Section was second only to the much larger IR Department of Northwestern University. Stanford IR faculty spoke on a broad range of topics, including DVT, chemoembolization, radioembolization, fusion nuclear medicine imaging, molecular image-guided interventions, and hybrid angio/C-arm CT imaging.

SIR specifically recognized the work of Daniel Sze, MD, PhD, associate professor of radiology, and Stephanie Carr, Stanford medical student. Dr. Daniel Sze was awarded the Featured Abstract Award for his project entitled. . .

"Combined Morphologic and Molecular Imaging to Evaluate Response to Intra-Arterial Administration of the Oncolytic Herpes Virus NV1020 for Treatment of Hepatic Colorectal Metastases" (coauthors include Drs. Sam Gambhir and Andrei Iagaru, as well as Dr. Tony Reid of the University of California, San Diego, formerly at our Palo Alto Veterans Administration Hospital in the Oncology Department).

Dr. Sze's abstract was in the top 5% of all abstracts presented and was the fourth Featured Abstract Award he has received in eight years. He is in the process of completing the manuscript that will describe the challenges of employing imaging to monitor the success of using oncolytic viruses to treat cancer because the early signs of success appear indistinguishable from disease progression.

Stephanie Carr was one of only three medical students nationally to receive the Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) Foundation Dr. Constantin Cope Medical Student Annual Scientific Meeting Research Award in recognition for her abstract, "Common Iliac Vein Diameter and Risk of Deep Venous Thrombosis,” which "best honors the spirit of inventiveness and scientific purity.” Under the direction of Section Chief Lawrence “Rusty” Hofmann, MD, and supported by a Stanford Medical Scholars Research Program Fellowship, Ms. Carr conducts research on deep venous thrombosis and stenting in the lower extremities.


Awards and Honors: April 1, 2010

EricOlcott_100.jpgEric Olcott, MD, associate professor of radiology and chief of diagnostic radiology at the Palo Alto Veterans Administration Hospital, received the Senior Faculty of the Year Award, 2008-2009, from the Stanford Department of Radiology for recognition of his outstanding contributions to resident education, compassionate patient care, and research.

Beginning his collegiate career at Stanford, Dr. Olcott earned his BS with distinction in biological sciences and attended Stanford University School of Medicine, graduating with commendations in immunology and medical microbiology. He completed an internship in internal medicine at the Presbyterian Hospital of Pacific Medical Center in San Francisco and went on to fulfill his residency in diagnostic radiology as well as fellowships in CT/ultrasound and interventional radiology at the University of California, San Francisco. Prior to coming to Stanford in 1993 as an acting assistant professor, Dr. Olcott was an assistant professor at the University of California, San Francisco.

The Senior Faculty of the Year Award, 2008-2009, is one of a long list of awards he has received, which include 1) the 2003 Cum Laude Award from the Society of Computed Body Tomography and Magnetic Resonance (SCBT/MR) Twenty-Sixth Annual Course for his research in collaboration with Drs. Chow and Sommer, "Clinical Utility of Double-Bolus Multidetector-Row CT Urography with Sliding Thin-Slab MIP" and 2) the 1999 Radiology Editor’s Recognition Award for Reviewing with Special Distinction (presented to 31 of 995 reviewers).

In addition to serving on numerous hospital and University committees at Stanford and UCSF, Dr. Olcott has published 4 book chapters and over 40 peer-reviewed articles. His current research and clinical focus is on body imaging utilizing CT, ultrasound, and MRI; magnetic resonance angiography; imaging of trauma; and CT angiography.


In the News: Debra Ikeda, MD

Ikeda070326_72.jpgIn a Feb. 24th Stanford University forum entitled, “Controversies in Screening for Women’s Cancer,” Dr. Debra Ikeda, professor of radiology and director of the Stanford University breast imaging section, discussed the controversial new federal guidelines on breast cancer screening that would delay a woman's first mammogram by 10 years and reduce annual screenings to every two years. To read more about her presentation, please access “Stanford Experts Question New Guidelines that Recommend Fewer Mammograms” from Inside Stanford Medicine.

Awards and Honors: March 30, 2010

Willmann100120.jpg
Juergen K. Willmann, MD, assistant professor of radiology (abdominal imaging) and head of the Translational Molecular Imaging Laboratory, has received the 2010 Roscoe E. Miller Best Paper Award at the annual meeting of the Society of Gastrointestinal Radiology in Orlando, Florida, for a project entitled "Monitoring Anti-Angiogenic Therapy in Colon Cancer With Molecular Ultrasound and a Novel Clinically Translatable Ultrasound Contrast Agent" (authors: MA Pysz, K Foygel, J Rosenberg, SS Gambhir, M Schneider, JK Willmann).

Dr. Willmann joined the Stanford Radiology faculty in 2008 as an assistant professor of radiology in the Abdominal Imaging Section and as a member of the Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford (MIPS). Dr. Willmann received his MD degree in 1998 from the Albert-Ludwigs-University Freiburg, Germany. Following his residency in diagnostic radiology at the University Hospital of Zurich, Dr. Willmann was assistant professor of radiology at the University of Zurich between 2003 and 2008, and received tenure in 2005. Between 2006 and 2008, Dr. Willmann also performed a dedicated molecular imaging research fellowship under the mentorship of Dr. Sanjiv Sam Gambhir.

Dr. Willmann is the PI of the Translational Molecular Imaging Lab at Stanford, which focuses on the development, testing, and clinical translation of novel molecular and functional imaging strategies for the early detection of cancer, monitoring of cancer therapy, and quantification of inflammation. When he is not working, Dr. Willmann enjoys his life as a new Dad and plays the piano.

To read Dr. Willmann's prior award postings, please access
http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2010/02/awards-and-hono-123.html;
http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2009/06/awards-and-hono-94.html; http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2009/04/awards_and_hono_79.html; http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2009/01/awards_and_hono_73.html; http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2008/11/awards_and_hono_61.html; http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2008/05/awards_and_hono_38.html; http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2007/12/awards_and_hono_21.html; and
http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2007/02/awards_and_hono_18.html.

Awards and Honors: March 29, 2010

Fan_Minogue.jpgHua Fan-Minogue, MD, PhD, Stanford Molecular Imaging Scholars Program (SMIS) Fellow in the Multimodality Molecular Imaging Lab, has been selected to receive an American Association for Cancer Research (AACR)-Merck Scholar-in-Training Award at the AACR 101st Annual Meeting 2010. With Scholar-in-Training Awards presented to fewer than 10% of applicants, the overall process is highly competitive. The AACR-Merck Scholar-in-Training Award is sponsored by Merck to support young investigators who will be presenting innovative papers at the AACR annual meeting.

Dr. Fan-Minogue's research in Dr. Sam Gambhir's laboratory focuses on developing novel bioluminescent imaging sensors to detect and monitor key cell signaling pathways involved in disease progression and tumor development. These sensors are genetically encoded imaging reporters, which can be introduced into cells and transgenic animals to spy on disease and cancers noninvasively, dynamically, and repetitively. These sensors provide insight into cancer-specific molecular machinery within the context of the whole animal. Dr. Fan-Minogue received her MD at the Peking Union Medical College in China and her PhD in cell biology and microbiology at the University of Alabama at Birmingham.

For her prior award, please see: "Awards and Honors: January 6, 2010."

In the News: Richard Barth, MD

Barth_0051-2.jpgRichard Barth, MD, associate chair of radiology and chief of pediatric imaging at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital, along with his team is one of the first to detect and diagnose an often misdiagnosed fetal genetic disease using prenatal magnetic resonance imaging. To read more about their life-saving discovery, please access "Unusual Prenatal MRI Detects Rare, Oft-Missed Genetic Disease" from Inside Stanford Medicine.

New Faculty Hires and Promotions: March 26, 2010

Stevens2010_150.jpgKathryn Stevens, MD, has been promoted to associate professor of radiology in the Musculoskeletal Imaging Section of our Department. Completing her medical education at St. Mary's Hospital Medical School at the University of London, she graduated first out of 2000 doctors qualifying in London that year, earning the University of London Gold Medal. While completing her medical degree at the University of London, she was active in the army reserves, and she became the British Army Women's Parachute Champion in 1986.

Dr. Stevens completed her radiology residency in Nottingham. She won a Wishbone Grant for research in power Doppler ultrasound and fulfilled a one-year fellowship in musculoskeletal radiology at the Nuffield Orthopaedic Center in Oxford, England. In 2000, Dr. Stevens came to Stanford as a research fellow, securing the Dr. Karol Sicher Cancer Research Fellowship and the Stanford Dean’s Fellowship. Although she only intended on staying for one year, she was persuaded to continue in a clinical capacity, eventually joining the faculty in 2003.

At Stanford, Dr. Stevens, "strives to be a excellent clinician" while maintaining her "British sense of humor." One of her main priorities is resident education, which she considers one of the most rewarding aspects of her job, and she was delighted to receive the Junior Faculty of the Year Award in 2009. She also maintains an active teaching role in the Departments of Orthopaedics, Sports Medicine, Emergency Medicine, and Rheumatology, and is an avid collector of teaching cases, amassing over 35,000 images over the past 10 years.

Dr. Stevens has published over 40 peer-reviewed publications and numerous other review articles. Her main research interests include clinical applications for newly developed MRI pulse sequences and ultrasound-guided interventions for sports injuries. When she is not in the office, her hobbies include hiking, skiing, composing quirky poetry, eating cheesecake, and travelling the globe.

Awards and Honors: March 26, 2010

Vilalta.jpgMarta Vilalta, PhD, postdoctoral scholar in the Imaging Radiobiology Laboratory, received a two-year postdoctoral fellowship from the Agència de Gestió d'ajuts Universitaris i de Recerca (AGAUR) of the Generalitat of Catalunya for her research project, "Evaluation of Combined Radiation and Anti-HIF Therapies for Cancer Using Novel Preclinical Imaging and Radiotherapy Tools." The goal of her research is the development of a preclinical model for studying the combined therapies in vivo using non-invasive imaging methods to evaluate a clinically relevant treatment strategy.

Dr. Vilalta joined Dr. Graves' lab after completing her PhD at the University of Barcelona. Her doctoral work investigated the in vivo behavior and functionality of mesenchymal stem cells as vehicles for gene therapy of tumors and for tissue regeneration using bioluminescence imaging. Dr. Vilalta's work at Stanford is focused on the development of a preclinical model for studying radiotherapy and anti-HIF therapies. New to the United States, she spends much of her free time trying to see as much of the U.S. as possible.

Awards and Honors: March 24, 2010

Carr_100.jpgStephanie Carr, Stanford medical student, has been awarded the Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) Foundation Dr. Constantin Cope Medical Student Annual Scientific Meeting Research Award. Ms. Carr was one of only three medical students nationally to receive this award in recognition for her high-quality abstract "that best honors the spirit of inventiveness and scientific purity." She presented her work, "Common Iliac Vein Diameter and Risk of Deep Venous Thrombosis," at the 2010 SIR 35th Annual Scientific Meeting in Tampa, Florida.

Ms. Carr is currently a second-year medical student at Stanford where she conducts research under the direction of Chief of Cardiovascular/Interventional Radiology Lawrence Hofmann, MD. Supported by a Stanford Medical Scholars Research Program Fellowship, Ms. Carr is working on projects that focus on deep venous thrombosis and stenting in the lower extremities. Her interest in vascular pathology led to her curiosity regarding interventional radiology and the innovative uses of imaging and minimally invasive procedures to treat patients with a wide variety of pathology. Her long-term goal is to become an interventional radiologist at an academic medical center, so that she can contribute to the field through her clinical practice, research, and teaching.

Awards and Honors: March 18, 2010

Balchandani_150.jpgPriti Balchandani, PhD, postdoctoral scholar in the Radiological Sciences Laboratory (RSL), has been selected as a 2010 Junior Fellow by the International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine (ISMRM). She received this honor because of her commitment to the ISMRM; her publication history; and her
selection as a presenter at the upcoming ISMRM-European Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine and Biology (ESMRMB) Joint Annual Meeting in Stockholm, May 1-7, 2010.

Dr. Balchandani's research is focused on novel RF pulse and pulse sequence design for human MR imaging and spectroscopy. She is particularly interested in harnessing the power of high-field MR magnets to visualize the brain in unprecedented detail. Her work on overcoming some of the main limitations of operating at high magnetic fields has resulted in several first authored publications as well as patent applications and selection as a finalist for the ISMRM 2008 Young Investigator Award. Dr. Balchandani received her BS in computer engineering at the University of Waterloo and her PhD in electrical engineering at Stanford University.

Speech Recognition Coming Soon to Stanford Medicine Imaging Center

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By Yvonne Casillas, Business Systems Analyst

RadWhere Speech Recognition from Nuance
By the end of this month, speech recognition will begin its launch at Stanford Medicine Imaging Center.

The speech recognition project team at Stanford has been working hard over the last four months to understand the applications capabilities; to integrate with other systems; to build report templates, and to develop new dictation workflows.

Dr. Herfkens, the initiative sponsor for the project, meets regularly with the project team to provide input and define goals.

Each section has a champion assigned, such as body fellow John Chang, MD, and mammography fellow Jafi Lipson, MD, who is diligently working on the creation of report templates, which will be available for future use. Within a matter of time, the new dictation process will become a more streamlined and efficient workflow.

Phase Roll-Out Plan
The roll-out is scheduled to occur in six phases.

Phase I begins March 23, 2010, for body and neuro MR/CT at Stanford Medicine Calendar.pngImaging Center. The remaining radiology sections will launch over the next several months to be completed by June 21st. The Training for Phase I is scheduled from March 15th through March 19th.

Are you scheduled to work at Stanford Medicine Imaging Center between March 23rd-April 2nd? If so, please contact please contact Yvonne Casillas, business systems analyst, to schedule your training! We want everyone to be well prepared. Similarly, all other rollouts will have training set up one week prior to going live with the application.

Awards and Honors: March 15, 2010

Iagaru_09_100.png Andrei Iagaru, MD, instructor of nuclear medicine, has earned the Normal D. Poe Memorial Scholarship Award for the "most outstanding abstract" at the physician/scientist level in the field of Nuclear Medicine. He received the award at the 34th Western Regional Society of Nuclear Medicine Annual Meeting in Monterey, CA, on October 30, 2009.

Andrei Iagaru, MD, completed medical school at the Carol Davila University of Medicine, Bucharest, Romania, and an internship at Drexel University College of Medicine, Graduate Hospital, in the Department of Medicine. He began his residency at the University of Southern California (USC) Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles, in the Division of Nuclear Medicine, where he was the chief resident. He finished his residency and completed a PET/CT fellowship at Stanford University's School of Medicine in the Division of Nuclear Medicine. He is currently an Instructor in the Department of Radiology and his current research interests include whole-Body MRI and PET/CT for early cancer detection; Zevalin/Bexxar radioimmunotherapy; optical imaging of breast cancer; clinical translation of novel PET radiopharmaceuticals; and PET-CT imaging for thyroid/breast cancers, melanoma, lymphoma, and sarcoma.

Please see his other award postings: Awards and Honors: July 17, 2009; Awards and Honors: May 26, 2009; and Awards and Honors I: July 15, 2008.

Awards and Honors II: March 10, 2010

Federle_100.gifMichael Federle, MD, associate chair for education and professor of radiology, was recently honored with the 2010 Society of Gastrointestinal Radiologists (SGR) Walter B. Cannon Medal Award, which is bestowed annually upon a distinguished gastrointestinal radiologist. Dr. Federle received this accolade for his sustained achievement over the course of his career. He was honored with his medal award at the 2010 Abdominal Radiology Course (ARC) Meeting in Orlando, Florida, on February 21-26, 2010.

As the associate chair for education, Dr. Federle’s focus is on teaching and instructing residents and radiologists in the latest internet-based materials for radiologic decision support and diagnosis. For the past ten years, he has focused on producing and authoring a series of textbooks and internet-based decision support tools through a company he co-founded, Amirsys. Dr. Federle’s training materials have proved to be very successful and are now used by more than 20,000 radiologists as well as by most U.S. residency programs, and they are beginning to spread to radiology programs worldwide. He is also working to integrate radiology into the medical student curriculum and creating products to teach physicians in other disciplines about radiologic principles.

Dr. Federle earned his undergraduate degree in biology at Marquette University in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and went on to graduate from medical school at Georgetown University in Washington, D.C. After finishing his internship in internal medicine at the University of Cincinnati Hospital in Ohio, he completed the radiology residency program at the University of Cincinnati. Prior to coming to our Department, he was the director of abdominal imaging for 16 of his 19 years at the University of Pittsburgh, where he also served as the chair of radiology as well as the chief of quality process and improvement. In addition to his Cannon Medal Award, Dr. Federle’s other awards include the 2007 Michael P. Federle Mentorship Award, which his residents at the University of Pittsburgh created in his honor. Besides his teaching, Dr. Federle's other accomplishments include 238 peer-reviewed journal articles and 17 books. When he is not in the office, he can probably be found on the Stanford Golf Course.

For his prior blog posting, please access “Stanford Radiology Welcomes Associate Chair for Education Michael Federle, MD."

Lifetime Achievement Award: Dr. Bruce Parker

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By Julie Ruiz-Wibbelsmann, PhD

“When I recognize so many familiar names as I read medical journals, I feel very proud that I helped train many of our Stanford residents who are contributing so significantly to radiology,” remarked Bruce Parker, MD, emeritus professor (clinical) of radiology and pediatrics. “Because my own life has been influenced by the people I met during my career, I am thrilled that I could help guide the next generation of radiologists who are shaping our field.” One of his most relished achievements was receiving Stanford Radiology’s Teacher of the Year Award in 1994 for doing what he loves most—passing on his experience to others.

Raised in Detroit, Michigan, Dr. Parker grew up . . .

. . . under the influence of his father who was a general practitioner. By the age of three, it had already been decided that he would become a physician. Even though he entertained the idea of becoming a pilot as an undergraduate at Harvard College, his intellectual interests remained in the sciences. As an undergraduate majoring in the history of science, he was heavily influenced by a professor who brought the Middle Ages to life through his lectures, and Dr. Parker went on to take every class he taught. Completing an honors thesis on a treatise regarding 14th century geometry in his senior year, Dr. Parker acquired the only three copies of the treatise in the world, and combined the three versions; translated the work from Latin to English; and wrote a commentary.

As a medical student at Harvard, his interest in a subject was directly proportional to the quality of the teaching. “In medical school, every time I took a class, if the class was well taught, that’s what I thought I’d do,” he remarked. He completed an internship at the University of Minnesota in internal medicine, where he was so impressed by the radiologists he decided to switch to radiology for his residency. However, Dr. Parker’s decision to change programs came late in the application process, and most positions had already been filled. Fortuitously, Columbia University called him after two newly admitted residents left to serve in the military. He was told that if he could accept a residency in radiology within 24 hours, it was his. And so he did.

Over the course of his three-year residency at Columbia, Dr. Parker spent one year as a resident in cancer therapy, where he developed an interest in pediatric cancer. He spent four months at what was then known as the Babies Hospital at Columbia (now referred to as Children’s Hospital of New York), where he was left in charge of the whole department at various times. This experience was pivotal in his decision to become a pediatric radiologist.

After completing his residency, Dr. Parker served as a captain from 1967 to 1969 in the United States Air Force, where he was stationed at a base in Michigan. Although he did not complete his dream of becoming a pilot, he did occasionally ride in B52s.

In 1969, Dr. Parker applied to the Stanford Department of Radiology. California intrigued him, especially after living in Detroit: “Back then, Palo Alto was a sleepy town,” he commented. “Although the population hasn’t changed much since then, the University campus has grown tremendously.” After meeting and interviewing with Dr. Frank Zboralske, chief of diagnostic radiology at Stanford, Dr. Parker was so impressed with the Department and with Dr. Zboralske’s dynamic energy that he accepted an appointment as assistant professor of radiology in 1969.

At Stanford, Dr. Parker filled in for Dr. William Northway, who was on sabbatical and who was the only pediatric radiologist at Stanford. Upon Dr. Northway’s return, Dr. Parker served as a general radiologist for one year and began to look for positions in private practice. Simultaneously, the Stanford Children’s Convalescent Hospital became the Children's Hospital at Stanford (the precursor to Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital), and the Department needed two pediatric radiologists. Dr. Parker was asked to stay on as one of them. “I remember carrying nine or ten films up flights of stairs on a busy day for morning conferences in the nursery,” Dr. Parker recalled. “Now they do 30 or 40 ICU studies a day. Back then, two or three fluoroscopy studies were a lot. The most significant departmental growth occurred when Dr. Gary M. Glazer became chair in 1989, and the Department expanded tremendously.”

One of the challenges Dr. Parker experienced during his career was the increasing separation from his patients by technological advances. “Technology has created a wall between us and our patients so that there are fewer and fewer face-to-face interactions,” he explained. “If the parents of one of my patients are really worried and anxious, I don’t think it’s fair to have them wait to get their child’s exam results, so I will communicate results directly to them if the results are normal. If the results are abnormal, I will tell the parents if I think they can tolerate the news and if it’s not a new diagnosis. Most parents are extremely worried and anxious about their children—more worried than they would be about themselves if they were waiting for the results of their own exams—so they are thankful to know the imaging results. Many pediatricians are also grateful that I give parents the results.”

In addition to serving as professor (clinical) of radiology and pediatrics in the School of Medicine, Dr. Parker has been committed to serving the University. He was a premedical advisor to many students and four of his advisees became pediatric radiologists. As a past chairman and a member of the Committee on Undergraduate Studies, Dr. Parker helped influence the Stanford undergraduate experience.

In 1995, he retired from Stanford as professor emeritus of radiology and pediatrics, after being offered the opportunity to serve as chair of the Department of Diagnostic Imaging at Texas Children’s Hospital in Houston and professor of radiology and pediatrics at Baylor College of Medicine. “I am very proud to have been part of the Stanford Radiology Department, and I am grateful for the many good friends I made while I was here at Stanford,” Dr. Parker related. During his 26 years at Stanford, he accumulated many honors, which included serving as past president of the Society for Pediatric Radiology; having a conference room named after him--the Parker Conference Room--at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital; and publishing over 100 original articles, review articles, and book chapters.

He retired as chair of the Texas Children’s Hospital (TCH) Department of Diagnostic Imaging in 2004 and now works clinically about 40% of the time. He and his wife enjoy traveling to New York and Seattle to see their two sons: one of whom is an attorney and the other, a jazz musician. “I also love to travel to France,” he remarked. “Unfortunately, I learned French late in life, so I speak with a terrible accent. My three-year old grandson speaks fluent French and insists I speak to him in English because he can’t understand my French.”

One of his favorite pastimes is reading and collecting detective and espionage fiction. Dr. Parker is a great fan of Sherlock Holmes. In the area of espionage, his favorite author is John Le Carre. Dr. Parker once spent five years looking for a John Le Carre book he finally found in an English bookstore, and he now has all the first English and American editions of Le Carre’s novels.

Awards and Honors I: March 10, 2010

Iagaru_09_100.png Andrei Iagaru, MD, instructor of nuclear medicine, was honored with the Best Essay Award for his presentation on "Combined 18F NaF and 18F FDG PET/CT Scan for Evaluation of Malignancy: Beyond the Pilot Study" at the 2010 Society of Nuclear Medicine (SNM)/American College of Nuclear Medicine (ACNM) Mid-Winter Conference in Albuquerque, New Mexico.

Andrei Iagaru, MD, completed medical school at the Carol Davila University of Medicine, Bucharest, Romania, and an internship at Drexel University College of Medicine, Graduate Hospital, in the Department of Medicine. He began his residency at the University of Southern California (USC) Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles, in the Division of Nuclear Medicine, where he was the chief resident. He finished his residency and completed a PET/CT fellowship at Stanford University's School of Medicine in the Division of Nuclear Medicine. He is currently an Instructor in the Department of Radiology and his current research interests include whole-Body MRI and PET/CT for early cancer detection; Zevalin/Bexxar radioimmunotherapy; optical imaging of breast cancer; clinical translation of novel PET radiopharmaceuticals; and PET-CT imaging for thyroid/breast cancers, melanoma, lymphoma, and sarcoma.

Please see his other award postings: Awards and Honors: July 17, 2009; Awards and Honors: May 26, 2009; and Awards and Honors I: July 15, 2008.

In the News: Shreyas Vasanawala, MD

Vasanawala_100.gifIn collaboration with his colleague, Michael Lustig, PhD, from the Department of Electrical Engineering--Information Systems Laboratory, Dr. Vasanawala has developed a much faster MRI scanning method for use in pediatric patients. According to a recent article from Wired Magazine, "Fill in the Blanks: Using Math to Turn Lo-Res Datasets Into Hi-Res Samples,"

Drs. Vasanawala and Lustig have designed an experimental algorithm called compressed sensing for use in MR imaging, which allows very high resolution images to be acquired rapidly and shortens the sedation time for pediatric patients.

To view Dr. Vasanawala’s prior postings, please see "Awards and Honors II: February 19, 2010"; "Dr. Vasanawala and Colleagues Receive the Prestigious Caffey Award"; Awards and Honors: April 22, 2009; "Awards and Honors: March 23, 2009"; "Awards and Honors II: February 13, 2009"; "Awards and Honors I: July 11, 2008"; and "New Faculty Hires and Promotions: July 3, 2007."

Awards and Honors: March 3, 2010

Gary_Glover.jpgGary H. Glover, PhD, director of the Radiological Sciences Laboratory in the Richard M. Lucas Center for Imaging; professor of radiology and, by courtesy, of electrical engineering and of psychology, has received the Outstanding Achievement Award from his alma mater, the University of Minnesota. This award is the highest honor an alumnus can receive from the University of Minnesota, second only to an honorary degree. Dr. Glover earned his undergraduate and graduate degrees in electrical engineering from the University of Minnesota.

After working at GE’s Corporate Research and Development Center and at GE Medical Systems for more than 20 years, he joined the Department of Radiology at Stanford in 1990. Dr. Glover’s research focuses on the physics and mathematics of CT and MR imaging. Through his research, he has helped develop products that have greatly improved patient care.

He has published more than 300 scientific research articles and is named on approximately 50 patents. One of Dr. Glover's research interests was published in an article he coauthored entitled “Control Over Brain Activation and Pain Learned by Using Real-Time Functional MRI" in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA (PNAS) (2005 102:18626-18631; published online before print December 13, 2005, doi:10.1073/pnas.0505210102).

To access his prior blog postings, please see "The Laughing Subject"; Pain Research by Drs. Sean Mackey, Chris deCharms, Gary Glover, and Colleagues Featured in Nature"; and "Tsinghua University's "Oversea Expert," Dr. Gary Glover."

Crocodiles in the AxiomLab!

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(all photos are courtesy of Mark Riesenberger)

By Julie Ruiz-Wibbelsmann, PhD

Dr. Rebecca Fahrig is scanning mummies once more in the AxiomLab. However, this time, the mummies are ancient crocodiles from Ptolemaic and Roman Egypt, where animal cults were widespread.

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According to an article entitled "The Temple of Soknebtunis" from The Center for the Tebtunis Papyri at the Bancroft Library of the University of California, Berkeley, "Ptolemy I (305–285 BCE) built the temple dedicated to . . .

a local form of the Egyptian crocodile god Sobek, Soknebtunis." The temple "housed image001_350.jpgthe manifestation of the crocodile god, embodied by a living crocodile. . . . When the crocodile died, the priests of the temple would mummify and bury it in a specifically designated tomb, and begin the search for a new animal in which the god made himself manifest." More than 1,000 crocodile mummies were found in Tebtunis, claims the exhibit description, "Crocodile Mummies: Linen and Plaster," from the Phoebe A. Hearst Museum at the University of California, Berkeley.

Dr. Fahrig used computed tomography to scan the crocodile mummies in the AxiomLab to determine what was inside them in preparation for an April 2010 exhibition. Before their scanning, the crumbling and brittle crocodile mummies had to be restored. To read more about the restoration process, please access
"Wrapping Things Up: Stabilizing a Crocodile Mummy"
(http://conservationblog.hearstmuseum.dreamhosters.com/) from Inside The Conservator's Art, which is the conservation blog of the Phoebe A. Hearst Museum of Anthropology.

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Other articles on mummy scanning in the AxiomLab include
"Dr. Fahrig's Mummy Scans Featured in SF Museum" and "Oldest Person Scanned at Stanford by Dr. Fahrig."

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Awards and Honors: February 24, 2010

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Juergen K. Willmann, MD, assistant professor of radiology (abdominal imaging) and head of the Translational Molecular Imaging Laboratory, has received the 2009 Editor’s Recognition Award with Distinction from Radiology for the "high quality of [his] prompt, detailed, and scholarly reviews."

Dr. Willmann joined the Stanford Radiology faculty in 2008 as an assistant professor of radiology in the Body Imaging Section and as a member of the Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford (MIPS). Dr. Willmann received his MD degree in 1998 from the Albert-Ludwigs-University Freiburg, Germany. Following his residency in diagnostic radiology at the University Hospital of Zurich, Dr. Willmann was assistant professor of radiology at the University of Zurich between 2003 and 2008, and received tenure in 2005. Between 2006 and 2008, Dr. Willmann also performed a dedicated molecular imaging research fellowship under the mentorship of Dr. Sanjiv Sam Gambhir.

Dr. Willmann is the PI of the Translational Molecular Imaging Lab at Stanford, which focuses on the development, testing, and clinical translation of novel molecular and functional imaging strategies for the early detection of cancer, monitoring of cancer therapy, and quantification of inflammation. When he is not working, Dr. Willmann enjoys his life as a new Dad and plays the piano.

To read Dr. Willmann's prior award postings, please access http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2009/06/awards-and-hono-94.html; http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2009/04/awards_and_hono_79.html; http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2009/01/awards_and_hono_73.html; http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2008/11/awards_and_hono_61.html; http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2008/05/awards_and_hono_38.html; http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2007/12/awards_and_hono_21.html; and
http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2007/02/awards_and_hono_18.html.

Awards and Honors: February 22, 2010

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   Drs. Hargreaves (L) and Gold (R)

Scott Delp, PhD, professor of bioengineering and mechanical engineering-biomechanical engineering; Garry Gold, MD, associate professor of radiology; Stuart Goodman, MD, professor of orthopaedic surgery; and Brian Hargreaves, PhD, assistant professor of radiology have been awarded a grant from the Wallace H. Coulter Translational Research Grant Program at Stanford for their project, “Improved MRI Around Metallic Implants.” The Coulter Research Grant Program is designed to bring together physicians and engineers to bridge “the gap between clinical needs and engineering solutions,” according to a recent Inside Stanford Medicine article entitled “Stanford-Coulter Program Awards Grants to Five Research Teams” (Feb. 8, 2010). This is Dr. Gold’s second grant from the Coulter Foundation.

People and Their Pets: Best Friends

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Claudia Cooper, RT, clinical director of imaging services, along with her friend, Teri Evans, have started a volunteer program through Best Friends Animal Society, which allows FeLV+ cats to go on sleepovers. To read the full article profiling their involvement, please see "Who's Thanking Who?" at http://network.bestfriends.org/groups/visitors/14385/news.aspx.

The Laughing Subject

Research by Drs. Catie Chang, Moriah Thomason, and Gary Glover was recently featured on a blog called Neurocooking because one of their subjects couldn't stop laughing during the experiment. To read the blog article as well as comments by the laughing participant, please access http://neurocooking.blogspot.com/2009/10/sounds-like-fun-guy.html.

To read the full research article, please access "Mapping and Correction of Vascular Hemodynamic Latency in the BOLD Signal" NeuroImage 43(2008): 90–102.


Awards and Honors II: February 19, 2010

Vasanawala_100.gifDr. Shreyas Vasanawala has been awarded an R01 grant from the NIH for his project that aims to develop, integrate, and validate new kid-friendly methods to reduce the need for anesthesia in pediatric MRI.

Dr. Vasanawala joined the Department of Radiology faculty in July of 2007, after receiving his degree and a PhD in biophysics from Stanford University, followed by residency training in radiology at Stanford University Medical Center and a pediatric radiology fellowship at Lucile Packard Children's Hospital (LPCH). During his fellowship, Dr. Vasanawala received specialty training in pediatric musculoskeletal imaging at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center and in pediatric cardiovascular imaging at Sick Kids in Toronto. At Stanford, Dr. Vasanawala's research aims to improve magnetic resonance imaging techniques for evaluating pediatric disease.

Awards and Honors I: February 19, 2010

Sandra Rodriguez_2009.jpgSandra Rodriguez, BS R(RT)(MR), MR research technologist, has co-authored an abstract that was recently accepted for poster presentation at the 2010 Nineteenth Annual Meeting of the Society for Magnetic Resonance Technologists (SMRT), to be held in the Stockholm, Sweden, on May 1-2, 2010; the poster Tour and Reception will precede the meeting on April 30, 2010. The title of Ms. Rodriguez's abstract is "Breath Holding Improvements in DCE for Thoracic and Body Carcinoma" (A Hargreaves, MT Alley, J Park, AM Sawyer, G Glover, A Quon).

Ms. Rodriguez earned her Bachelor of Science in Health Administration (BSHA) in an online program through the University of Phoenix in September of 2008. She is currently enrolled in the Master's Program in Health Administration and will receive her degree in November 2010. As an MRI technologist at the Lucas Center, Ms. Rodriguez helps users set-up for their studies and facilitates their scans, providing support whenever necessary. She also does quality assurance on our three scanners and makes sure they are running smoothly. In her free time, Ms. Rodriguez enjoys cardio kickboxing; reading; and trying to keep up with a teenage girl (her daughter).

For her prior awards listings, please access http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2009/08/awards-and-hono-105.html and http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2008/04/awards-and-hono-35.html.

In the News: Joe Wu, MD, PhD

Wu_100100.jpgJoe Wu, MD, PhD, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, was recently featured in an article by Inside Stanford Medicine entitled “Virus-Free Technique Enables Scientists to Easily Make Stem Cells Pluripotent, Moving Closer to Possible Human Therapies," which describes his research on transforming stem cells from human fat into induced pluripoten stem cells. To read more about his work, please access “Research by Dr. Wu and Colleagues Induces Fat Cells to Become iPS Cells."

In the News: Sandy Napel, PhD

Napel_9_150.gifSandy Napel, PhD, professor of radiology and, by courtesy, of medicine (medical informatics) and of electrical engineering as well as co-director of ISIS (Information Sciences in Imaging at Stanford) and the Radiology 3D Laboratory, was recently featured by Inside Stanford: Notable People for his election to the College of Fellows of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering (AIMBE).

To read more about his election, please access “Awards and Honors: November 23, 2009."

ABC 7 Spotlights Canary Center for Cancer Early Detection at Stanford

The work of Dr. Gambhir and scientists at our Canary Center for Cancer Early Detection is featured in a recent news story, "Spotting Cancer Sooner Than Ever Before," which aired on ABC 7 on February 1, 2010. By developing tests that are a thousand times more sensitive than what is currently available, the Canary Center will be able to screen patients for blood proteins that signal the presence of a tumor much earlier than current tests. "Proteins, potentially in your blood, that would be indicative of possible early cancer somewhere in your body; those would then be followed up by molecular imaging studies to actually image the sites of the cancer," Dr. Gambhir explains in the broadcast. Phase one clinical trials at Stanford are about to begin for an ovarian cancer blood test developed at the Canary Center. To read more and listen to ABC 7's broadcast, please access "Spotting Cancer Sooner Than Ever Before" at http://abclocal.go.com/kgo/story?section=news/health&id=7251830.

Research Opportunity Database

The Stanford Medical Student Association recently launched a database that allows Stanford Medical School faculty to post a description of their research opportunities for interested medical students. For more information, please access the Research Project Database at https://www.stanford.edu/group/smsa/cgi-bin/view_research.php.

Awards and Honors II: January 29, 2010

geneser_100.jpgSarah Geneser, PhD, postdoctoral fellow in the Radiological Sciences Laboratory, has been awarded a Dean's Postdoctoral Fellowship from the Stanford School of Medicine, to model the impact of hormone replacement therapy on breast cancer risk and progression to better understand the physiological effects on breast tumor development. She is working with Dr. Sylvia Plevritis to investigate the impact of mammography screening and treatment on breast cancer incidence and survival. Dr. Geneser received her PhD in computer science from the University of Utah in 2008.

Awards and Honors I: January 29, 2010

RakowPenner_100.jpgRebecca Rakow-Penner, MD/PhD candidate in biophysics and graduate student in the Radiological Sciences Laboratory, has been selected as a finalist for the Young Investigators’ W.S. Moore Award in clinical science. Finalists will be given the honor of presenting their papers at the upcoming Joint Annual Meeting of the International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine-European Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine and Biology (ISMRM-ESMRMB), which will be held in Stockholm, Sweden, May 1-7, 2010. Ms. Rakow-Penner will give a presentation on her work entitled, "Detecting Blood Oxygen Level Dependent Contrast in the Breast." An article based on her research project is under consideration for publication by the Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

Before coming to Stanford, Ms. Rakow-Penner received her MS in bioengineering from the California Institute of Technology and her SB in engineering with an emphasis on biomedicine from Harvard University, where she also completed a senior honors thesis entitled "Design of Detector Coils for Improved Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Breast." As a graduate student at Stanford, Ms. Rakow-Penner is developing unique MRI technology for breast imaging. She has already published 4 articles and 11 peer-reviewed abstracts on her work. In addition, Ms. Rakow-Penner has received the California Breast Cancer Research Program Dissertation Award, ranking highest in her review section for this honor. Her other numerous activities include serving as the president for the Radiology Interest Group at Stanford and working as the legislative ambassador for the American Cancer Society of Northern California, which involves meeting with legislators to encourage them to support cancer research funding.

Awards and Honors: January 13, 2010

vandenbroucke_100_2010.jpgArne Vandenbroucke, PhD, postdoctoral scholar in the Molecular Imaging Instrumentation Lab, received a three-year postdoctoral fellowship from the Department of Defense (DOD) Breast Cancer Research Program (BCRP) of the Office of the Congressionally Directed Medical Research Programs for his research proposal entitled "Commissioning and Characterization of a Dedicated High-Resolution Breast PET Camera." The goal of the proposed project is to construct and to commission a PET camera, dedicated to breast imaging with a state-of-the art resolution of 1mm3. Additionally, the camera will employ a novel detection concept, yielding a better detection sensitivity and resulting in shorter patient scanning times. Such a camera could apply the benefits of PET imaging at an earlier stage in breast cancer management.

Dr. Vandenbroucke received his PhD in experimental particle physics from Gent University in Belgium. Before coming to Stanford, he worked on the HERMES experiment, researching the spin structure of the nucleon at the DESY (Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron or the "German Electron Synchrotron") in Hamburg, Germany. When he is not in the lab, he likes spending his time outdoors sailing, snowboarding, or traveling. For his prior blog postings, please access http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2008/12/awards-and-hono-66.html; http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2008/03/march-27-2008.html; and http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2007/12/awards_and_hono_23.html.

207-Pound Donation Made by the Lucas Center

During our Fourth Annual Lucas Center Food Drive, we collected and donated 207 pounds of food to the Second Harvest Food Bank to help feed those in need. Thanks to the wonderful coordination efforts of Donna Cronister, the Lucas Center administrative services manager, who organized our food drive and to all of the generous donations of our colleagues! To read about last year's food drive, please access http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2009/01/third-annual-lu-1.html.

Awards and Honors: January 7, 2010

Ren_100.jpgYing Ren, MD, radiologist at Sheng Jing Hospital of China Medical University and postdoctoral scholar in the Translational Molecular Imaging Lab headed by Dr. Juergen Willmann, has received the 2010 Stanford Dean’s Fellowship for her research proposal entitled "Evaluation of Activity and Remission of Inflammatory Bowel Disease by Molecular Targeted Microbubble-Enhanced Ultrasound in a Mouse Colitis Model."

Dr. Ren received her MD from Peking Union Medical College, where she specialized in the early detection of pancreatic cancer using multiple imaging modalities. Her current research focuses on the multimodality molecular imaging of angiogenesis in tumor and inflammation, which will be helpful for the early detection of disease and the monitoring of treatment.

Awards and Honors: January 6, 2010

Fan_Minogue.jpgHua Fan-Minogue, MD, PhD, Stanford Molecular Imaging Scholars Program (SMIS) Fellow in the Multimodality Molecular Imaging Lab, was awarded a Travel Fellowship from the Helena Anna Henzl Gabor Young Women in Science Fund to attend the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) 101st Annual Meeting 2010. The Henzl-Gabor Travel Fellowships are awarded to postdoctoral scholars who have demonstrated a positive attitude through professional teamwork and collaborations with other scientists.

Dr. Fan-Minogue's research in Dr. Sam Gambhir's laboratory focuses on developing novel bioluminescent imaging sensors to detect and monitor key cell signaling pathways involved in disease progression and tumor development. These sensors are genetically encoded imaging reporters, which can be introduced into cells and transgenic animals to spy on disease and cancers noninvasively, dynamically, and repetitively. In collaboration with pediatricians and oncologists on campus, Dr. Fan-Minogue has applied these sensors to investigate insulin signaling in diabetic cardiomyopathy as well as oncogene signaling in tumorigenesis. These sensors provided insight into cancer-specific molecular machinery within the context of the whole animal. Dr. Fan-Minogue also aims to apply them to facilitate targeted cancer therapy and drug development.

Dr. Fan-Minogue received her medical training in Peking Union Medical College in China. She then obtained her PhD in microbiology and cell biology from the University of Alabama at Birmingham, where she investigated molecular mechanisms and performed the functional analysis of translation termination in eukaryotes in Dr. David Bedwell's laboratory. Featured in Molecular Cell, Dr. Fan-Minogue's work provided the scientific basis for developing drugs against genetic diseases caused by premature stop codon.

Radiology Rays Sweep the 2009 Division C Softball League Championship!

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Created in 2006 and coached by Fred Chin, PhD, head of Cyclotron Radiochemistry, the Radiology Rays have just completed their fourth year of competing in the Stanford University Medical Center (SUMC) Softball League, which is comprised of about 25 teams. Over their past four seasons, the Radiology Rays have had more than 55 different players participate on their team, primarily from the Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford (MIPS) and the Radiological Sciences Laboratory (RSL). They have come a long way since their first season in 2006 when they finished . . .


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Fred Chin, PhD, presents the Division C League Trophy to Stanford Radiology Chair, Dr. Glazer, at this year's MIPS/RSL/ISIS Annual Retreat.

24th out of 25 teams with a total of 30 runs, 1 win, and 7 losses. In 2007, the Radiology Rays improved, finishing 17th out of 24 teams with a total of 74 runs, 3 wins, and 5 losses. This past season, the Radiology Rays won their division, finishing the 2009 season as the Stanford University Medical Center Division C League champions after defeating their opponents, the “Traumatizers,” 21 to 17. In the postseason playoffs, they lost to the Division B Champions, who went on to play the Division A Champions in the overall SUMC Championship. At the conclusion of their season, Coach Fred Chin presented most valuable player awards to Kristin Granlund, graduate student in electrical engineering and radiology, and Tom Brosnan, PhD, research scientist.

Since 2006, the Radiology Rays have been supported by Gary M. Glazer, MD, Emma Pfeiffer Merner Professor in the Medical Sciences and chair of the Department of Radiology, and Sam Gambhir, MD, PhD, Virginia and D.K. Ludwig Professor of Radiology and Bioengineering; chief of the Nuclear Medicine Division; director of the Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford (MIPS); and head of the new Canary Center for Cancer Early Detection. The Radiology Rays are looking forward to the start of their fifth season in 2010, which will tentatively begin after Memorial Weekend next year. They welcome all players with varying levels of softball/baseball experience. Many of the current players had no experience with softball when they began playing, but ended up loving the sport! For a listing of present and past members of the Radiology Rays, please click here: Rays _Past Present Members.pdf. Please contact Fred Chin at chinf@stanford.edu if you are interested in playing next season.

For prior blog articles on the Radiology Rays, please access “Radiology Rays’ Second Season” and “Radiology Rays Take a Swing at Their Second Softball Season."


Stanford 3D Lab Emerges as Imaging Leader

The Stanford Radiology 3D Laboratory is featured in the December 9, 2009 RSNA News (vol. 19; no. 12) article, “Stanford Lab Emerges as 3D Imaging Leader,” which describes how the lab has “established itself as an international epicenter for developing and teaching the 3D image postprocessing techniques that are becoming increasingly critical to clinicians and researchers worldwide.” Since its inception in 1996, the Lab was among the “first to develop advanced visualization for CT colonoscopy as well as vascular visualization techniques.” A few of the many innovations produced by the 3D lab include several computer-aided detection (CAD) techniques for procedures, such as CT colonoscopy and lung nodule detection, as well as improvements in postprocessing speed. Clinically, the Lab processes almost 1,000 cases every month, improving patient care locally and setting an example globally. This level of productivity is the main reason for the Lab's recognition, and is made possible by Laura Pierce, the world's best and most experienced lab manager, and her incredible staff of technologists (Keshni Kumar, Will Johnsen, Linda Novello, Marc Sofilos, Shannon Walters, and Nancy Ware) and support personnel (Debra Frank, Kala Raman, and Keesha Winston).

To read the full article, please access http://www.rsna.org/Publications/rsnanews/December-2009/upload/RSNA_News_Dec2009.pdf.

Awards and Honors: December 18, 2009

WangDavid_120.jpgDavid Wang, MD, fourth-year radiology resident, has won two awards: a Radiological Sciences of North America (RSNA) Travel Award for Young Investigators in Molecular Imaging and a World Molecular Imaging Conference Travel Stipend. David received these awards for his research on gene therapy using ultrasound and custom-made microbubbles, which serve as carrier vehicles for therapeutic delivery. He pursued this work in the laboratories of Drs. Juergen Willmann and Sanjiv Gambhir during a five-month sabbatical from his clinical training under the residency program's newly established research track. David's project was supported by a RSNA Research & Education Foundation/Toshiba America Medical Systems Research Resident Grant awarded to him last year.

Prior to residency, David received his medical degree from Stanford and was a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Fellow. As a medical student, he was the lead founder and first manager of Pacific Free Clinic, a volunteer-run health clinic that offers basic healthcare services to low-income immigrants in San Jose. The Clinic is currently in its sixth year of operation and has served thousands of patients. After residency, David plans to pursue a career in academic radiology.

For his prior blog posting, please access "Awards and Honors: June 12, 2008."

Pain Research by Drs. Sean Mackey, Chris deCharms, Gary Glover, and Colleagues Featured in Nature

In 2005, Dr. Mackey and colleagues demonstrated that people could be taught to manipulate the fMRI signal in brain regions that subserve pain perception, ultimately controlling their pain through feedback fMRI. In patients with chronic pain, an average reduction of 64% in pain levels was shown. Dr. Glover's contribution to this important study was the development of real-time image acquisition software. Results were published in an article entitled “Control Over Brain Activation and Pain Learned by Using Real-Time Functional MRI" in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA (PNAS) (2005 102:18626-18631; published online before print December 13, 2005, doi:10.1073/pnas.0505210102). Other Stanford colleagues included Fumiko Maeda, David Ludlow, John M. Pauly, Deepak Soneji, and John D. E. Gabrieli.

Their research was recently featured in an article by Erik Vance entitled "Neuroscience: Shooting Pain" published in Nature (461, 1194-1196 (28 October 2009) doi:10.1038/4611194a) regarding various attempts to commercialize the fMRI feedback they developed through their research. In the article, Dr. Glover expresses cautious optimism about the use of fMRI for pain therapy. To read the full article, please access http://www.nature.com/news/2009/091028/pdf/4611194a.pdf.

New Faculty Hires and Promotions: December 7, 2009

Levin_100.jpgCraig Levin, PhD, has been promoted to professor of radiology. Currently, he leads the Molecular Imaging Instrumentation Laboratory (MIIL) where his lab's main research interests are to advance instrumentation and signal processing algorithms for noninvasive imaging of basic cellular and molecular processes associated with disease. The new "cameras" developed by his lab image photon emissions from molecular contrast agents or "probes" designed to target specific cellular and molecular processes associated with disease in cells located deep within the tissues of living subjects. The technical goals of the instrumentation projects are to advance the photon detection efficiency as well as spatial, energy, and temporal resolutions. The algorithmic goals are to understand the physical system comprising the subject tissues, photon transport, and camera, and to realize the best available reconstructed image quality and quantitative accuracy. The work involves the design, development, and testing of novel position-sensitive photon sensors and systems; low-noise readout electronics; data acquisition electronics; computer modeling; computer graphics; tomographic image reconstruction algorithms; signal/image processing algorithms; and data/image analysis. Key goals of their research include . . .

incorporating these innovations into practical imaging devices and introducing these new in vivo imaging tools into the clinic as well as into preclinical research to advance studies of novel probes and molecular mechanisms of disease to aid the discovery and monitoring of novel treatments. If successful, these innovative tools will substantially enhance the visualization and quantification of subtle molecular signatures associated with disease, enabling molecular imaging to play an earlier role in disease management.

This work has been supported by grants from the NIH National Cancer Institute, NIH National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering, California Breast Cancer Research Program, the Whitaker Foundation, GE Healthcare, and Philips Healthcare. Student and postdoctoral fellowships have been supported by the Stanford Bio-X Program, School of Medicine Dean’s Fellowship Program, Society of Nuclear Medicine, Belgian-American Education Foundation, AXA Foundation, and the Department of Defense. Since May of 2004 (when Dr. Levin arrived at Stanford) through December 2008, his research program has generated over 70 research articles in some of the premier journals of the field of imaging system technology advancement. Between May 2004 and December 2008, he and his lab have also delivered over 100 scientific conference presentations and 70 invited talks; garnered more than $8 million in research grants and $1 million in fellowship funds; and completed 16 patent applications. Since beginning at Stanford Radiology in 2004, Dr. Levin has also trained over 48 young scientists, including postdoctoral fellows, graduate students, and undergraduate students.

Awards and Honors: December 7, 2009

Norbert-Pelc_25.jpgNorbert Pelc, ScD, professor of radiology and bioengineering, has been elected to the position of Third Vice President of the Radiological Society of North America.

For his prior blog posting, please see "Awards and Honors: March 26, 2008."

Our SHC Diagnostic Radiology Team

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Bottom row: Avi, Cesar, Desiree, and Javier
Back Row: Isaias, Erica, Bonnie, Raenee, Gordon, Carol, Jeff, Christoph, and Edmond
(Avi, Cesar, Isaias, and Bonnie are second-year students from Foothill Community College.)

By Julie Ruiz, PhD

One of the oldest radiology sections at Stanford Hospital and Clinics (SHC), Diagnostic Radiology has grown to over 60 staff members who work in a wide variety of areas at SHC, including the Emergency Room; the Operating Room; the Gastrointestinal Unit; the Stanford Cancer Center; the new Endoscopy Suite; Vaden Student Health Center; Blake Wilbur; and the Arrillaga Sports Center.

Our Section is constantly growing and changing as technologists train in Diagnostic Radiology and transfer to other SHC areas such as CT, MRI, and the cath lab. Two years ago, the Section experienced tremendous growth when the Hospital Administration approved an increase in staffing, which allowed Diagnostic Radiology Supervisor Janis Troeger RT (R)(M)(MR) to hire 23 new staff members. Many of the technologists . . .

Ms. Troeger hires are new graduates from areas around the globe such as Australia, Europe, and South America.

To ensure the continual education of our Diagnostic Radiology team, we are developing a program, in conjunction with the clinical instructors, to provide continuing education credits to staff and to members of the surrounding community. Our free program will help technologists fulfill their requirement of completing 24 educational credits every 2 years. We also provide our technologists with motivational feedback to help advance their careers. In our Section, employees write compliments to each other on a regular basis on a “WOW” card, which is posted publicly; “WOW” comments are also written in the employee’s record. This is a great way to acknowledge each other’s hard work. Sometimes, these complimentary cards are completed by patients as well. Employees receiving a “WOW” card not only receive public recognition, but they are also given a free coffee card.

There is no typical day in the world of diagnostic radiology. Patients walk in to the Section unscheduled for their exams so things change very quickly from one minute to the next. Technologists must be very flexible and adaptive, because they rotate through all radiologic areas at SHC. Consequently, they must have an in-depth knowledge of how to set-up and operate the different modalities and protocols as well as establish the examination positioning for patients. In preparation, technologists must go through a minimum of two years at an X-ray school approved by the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT), and they must have a minimum of two licenses (state certification in X-ray and fluoroscopy). Most of our technologists have three to six licenses and complete two to three months of training once hired at SHC.

One of the most challenging aspects of working in Diagnostic Radiology is the physicality of the work, which involves lifting patients and carrying and manipulating equipment. However, this high level of patient interaction is also one of the most rewarding aspects. One of the first people a trauma patient will see is a technologist from Diagnostic Radiology. Most of these patients are experiencing a lot of pain, so they are challenging to X-ray. We get a high degree of satisfaction by making the exam as comfortable for them as possible. Because SHC is a research hospital, we also receive a higher volume of the most complicated surgical and pathological cases. This adds to the challenge and rewards of working in our Section while making Stanford Hospital and Clinics a really interesting place to work.

Awards and Honors: November 24, 2009

Olcott_09.jpgPeter Olcott, graduate student in the Bioengineering Department and member of the Molecular Imaging Instrumentation Laboratory, has won two awards: 2009 IEEE Nuclear Science Symposium and Medical Imaging Conference (NSS/MIC) Best Student Paper Award and the 2009 Bio-X Stanford Interdisciplinary Graduate Fellowship (SIGF). Peter received the Best Student Paper Award for his article entitled "Cross-Strip Capacitive Multiplexing and Electro-Optical Coupling for Silicon Photomultiplier Arrays for PET Detectors."

He was granted the SIGF Award to pursue research aimed at greatly increasing the resolution of positron emission tomography (PET) through the use of novel photonic materials and devices. Peter stumbled upon this idea while working on a new PET detector that works inside an MRI scanner. He will try and merge extremely fast non-linear optics studied in the Applied Physics Department to the radiological problem of detecting the arrival time and location of a high-energy photon emitted in a positron annihilation. The PET/MRI project has brought him into close collaboration with Dr. Glover and a whole range of very helpful researchers and engineers in the Lucas Center. The Bio-X Stanford Interdisciplinary Graduate Fellowship (SIGF) was created by the Office of the Vice Provost for Graduate Education (VPGE) and the Graduate Fellowships Faculty Advisory Committee (GFFAC) for graduate students across the campus to pursue research across departments. Peter was one of 12 SIGF award recipients selected from an applicant pool of 171 students from 41 different departments.

Awards and Honors: November 23, 2009

Napel_9_150.gifSandy Napel, PhD, professor of radiology and, by courtesy, of medicine (medical informatics) and of electrical engineering as well as co-director of ISIS (Information Sciences in Imaging at Stanford) and the Radiology 3D Laboratory, has been elected to the College of Fellows of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering (AIMBE), which is comprised of the top 2% of medical and biological engineers. Since its founding in 1991, the AIMBE has been known as a leader in public policy issues affecting the medical and biological community.

Dr. Napel was elected Fellow of the AIMBE for his significant contributions to the field. He joins 950 other Fellows, who are also outstanding bioengineers in academia, industry, and government and who have also distinguished themselves through their contributions in research, industrial practice, and/or education.

Our Annual Update 2009/2010 Is Here!

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Did You Know?

  • Voted the 2009 “Best Radiologist Training Program” by AuntMinnie.com, Stanford Radiology was recently recognized for excellence in radiological education.
  • Achieving a perfect grant score, the Stanford Radiological Sciences Laboratory (RLS) and the Department of Electrical Engineering’s Magnetic Resonance Imaging Systems Research Laboratory (MRSRL) received renewal of their NIH P41 Grant for the Center for Advanced Magnetic Resonance Technology at Stanford (CAMRT), extending its funding through its twentieth year.

  • National Institutes of Health (NIH) funding to Stanford Radiology has grown from $6 million in 2002 to $23 million in 2009.

  • To read more, please access our Annual Update 2009/2010.

    Awards and Honors: November 10, 2009

    GangRen.jpgGang (Tiger) Ren, MD, PhD, postdoctoral scholar in the Cancer Molecular Imaging Chemistry Laboratory (CMICL), has a recent research publication featured on MDLinx.com: "Melanin-Targeted Preclinical PET Imaging of Melanoma Metastasis" (J Nucl Med. 2009 Oct;50(10):1692-9. Epub 2009 Sep. 16).

    Dr. Ren received his medical training from the Tongji University School of Medicine in Shanghai, China, and a PhD in advanced radiological sciences from the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas. Working primarily with Professor Zhen Cheng in the Cancer Molecular Imaging Chemistry Lab, he brings his expertise in small animal imaging using microSPECT and microPET to the In Vivo Cellular and Molecular Imaging Center at Stanford (ICMIC) Program. Dr. Ren's research centers on the development of different molecular probes, including both small molecules and peptides, to target specific tumor biomarkers such as the MC1R receptor; melanin contents in malignant melanoma; and HER2/EGFR in breast cancer. He has already successfully demonstrated the potential of the molecular probes ReCCMSH, Benzamide Analogs, and Affibody molecules in preclinical animal models using microPET. He continues to work on the development of new probes as well as a novel image-guided theragnostic scheme for the management of breast cancer and lung cancer.

    National Radiologic Technology Week: Nov. 8-14, 2009

    By Rachel Silveria and Stanford Imaging Services

    During National Radiologic Technology Week (NRTW), an annual recognition established by the American Society of Radiologic Technologists (ASRT), we celebrate the great advances in radiologic technologies that have been made since the discovery of the X-ray on November 8, 1895.

    The week of November 8-14th, we proudly celebrate all employees of Stanford's world-renowned Department of Radiology for continually providing outstanding care. Offering the best diagnostic imaging services and expertise while utilizing state-of-the-art technology, this Department never fails to demonstrate extraordinary teamwork by all its dedicated medical professionals. For more than one-hundred years, Stanford Radiology has made a difference in the lives of patients and their families, while continuing to . . .

    make important contributions to medical and surgical advances. This hardworking Department, in this ever-growing Stanford community, continues to lead imaging-based research, patient care, and education. This year in particular, the Stanford Radiology Department has pioneered transformations in several areas. These significant advances, along with our teamwork and excellence in patient care, make our Department unique among radiologic service providers and serve as an inspiration to our patients.

    Furthering our clinical imaging enterprise, we unveiled two new outpatient centers this year: Stanford Medicine Imaging Center in Palo Alto and Stanford Medicine Outpatient Center in Redwood City. Focused on patient comfort, both of our Centers have been designed to ease the tensions associated with health problems through innovative approaches to reduce anxiety such as promoting a calming environment; utilizing beautiful architecture; and employing a patient-centric approach to healthcare delivery. With the added imaging capacity of both Centers, we have accelerated our delivery of outpatient care, while providing imaging services with the most advanced technology available. By constantly innovating, we have placed ourselves in a continual state of technological advancement.

    Additionally, we have completely rebuilt our Nuclear Medicine Clinic on the 2nd floor of Stanford Hospital and Clinics (SHC). After years of planning, the anticipated opening of the Clinic is July 2010. In addition to two new state-of-the-art PET/CT 64 slice systems, the design also includes a Radiochemistry Lab and a Health Physics Workshop. The work flow of patients will dramatically improve with the centrally located design and features.


    Stanford Radiology Imaging Services by Location:

    Blake Wilbur


    • CT

    • MRI

    • Comprehensive Diagnostic Digital Radiography

    • PET/CT

    • Ultrasound

    • Mammography

    • Fluoroscopy


    Stanford Medicine Imaging Center, Palo Alto


    • CT

    • MRI


    Stanford Hospital and Clinics


    • CT

    • MRI

    • Magnetic Resonance Therapy

    • Nuclear Medicine

    • Comprehensive Diagnostic Digital Radiography

    • Ultrasound

    • Angiography/Interventional Radiology

    • (PET/CT Planned for 2010)


    Stanford Advanced Medicine Center

    • Comprehensive Diagnostic Digital Radiography

    • Full-Field Digital Mammography

    • Computer-Aided Detection Program for Screening Mammography

    • Stereotactic Core Biopsy Program

    • Ultrasound

    Stanford Medicine Outpatient Center, Redwood City


    • CT

    • MRI

    • Diagnostic Digital Radiography

    • Ultrasound

    • Bone Densitometry

    • Fluoroscopy


    Dr. William Kuo and Colleagues Reveal Lifesaving Treatment for Pulmonary Embolism

    KUO PIC_mostrecent_100.jpgDr. William Kuo was recently featured in a Stanford Medicine News article and national press release entitled "Study Reveals Life-Saving Treatment for Pulmonary Embolism." Dr. Kuo discussed the results from his study published in the November 2009 issue of the Journal of Vascular and Interventional Radiology (20(11):1431-1440). Analyzing global data regarding the use of catheter-directed therapy for massive PE, he and his colleagues discovered that the therapy was life-saving in 86.5% of the 594 cases they studied. Dr. Kuo published his findings along with co-authors Lawrence Hofmann, MD, associate professor and chief of cardiovascular-interventional radiology; Daniel Sze, MD, associate professor of radiology; John Louie, MD, assistant professor of radiology; Jarrett Rosenberg, PhD, statistician; and Michael Gould, MD, associate professor of pulmonary and critical care medicine. The full Stanford press release can be accessed here: http://med.stanford.edu/ism/2009/october/embolism.html.

    The Pediatric Musculoskeletal (MSK) Interventional Program at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital (LPCH)

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    CT-guided imaging at LPCH for treatment of juvenile idiopathic arthritis: The arrow shows the trajectory of the needle for placement of steroid medication into the temporomandibular joint.

    By Julie Ruiz, PhD

    “I was hoping my scar would be bigger,” remarked one of our pediatric patients with some disappointment as she undid her bandage. Several days earlier her bone tumor had been successfully treated through a computed tomography (CT) image-guided ablation procedure performed by our Pediatric MSK Interventional team at Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital (LPCH).

    MacKenzie_100.gifTo treat children with bone tumors, our Chief of Pediatric Musculoskeletal Imaging, Dr. John MacKenzie, has teamed up with Drs. Larry Rinsky, James Gamble, and Meghan Imrie, pediatric orthopedists at LPCH. Because CT-guided radiofrequency (RF) ablations for osteoid osteoma tumors require a very small incision and leave virtually no scar, many parents

    have expressed their gratitude for the work done through our Pediatric Musculoskeletal Interventional Program. One mother was ecstatic that her daughter had her first "good night’s sleep in years" the day after the team had eliminated her bone lesion with CT-guided RF ablation.

    These are just a few of the many success stories from the Pediatric Musculoskeletal Interventional Program at LPCH, which is helping to expand the minimally invasive options for our smallest patients. Dr. MacKenzie says he enjoys the interventional part of his work at LPCH because it gives him a chance to interact directly with the patients: "Often the role of the pediatric radiologist is as the doctor's doctor, seeing the patient for the most part by how they look on the imaging study." However, he finds the interventional component of his work very rewarding because he gets a chance to do something that may help while meeting the kids and family at the same time.

    Along with the pediatric orthopedists, Dr. MacKenzie has also teamed up with rheumatologists and oncologists at LPCH in order to offer other image-guided diagnostic and treatment procedures to children, such as bone and soft tissue biopsies, joint aspirations, and diagnostic and therapeutic joint arthrograms.

    Prior to the Pediatric Musculoskeletal Interventional Program, children were treated with a larger incision or transferred to the adult hospital. The smaller body parts of pediatric patients present a particular challenge for successful image-guided procedures, but the Program is adapting smaller tools made to fit children as well as special techniques to minimize the CT dose delivered to radiosensitive tissues.

    These image-guided therapies help shorten the recovery time, reduce pain, and increase the chance for recovery. Since the Program began 2 years ago, they have treated over 60 children for various minimally invasive procedures with excellent response. Imaging guidance includes fluoroscopy, CT, and ultrasound and the approach varies depending on what imaging strategy works best for an individual child.

    Stanford Radiology Voted "Best Radiologist Training Program"


    Voted the 2009 "Best Radiologist Training Program" by AuntMinnie.com, Stanford Radiology was recently recognized for excellence in radiological education.

    Dr. Gary M. Glazer and Colleagues Use Image-Guided Insonification for Tumor Biomarker Detection

    Emma Pfeiffer Merner Professor in the Medical Sciences and chair of the Department of Radiology, Gary M. Glazer, MD, led a team of researchers in a ground-breaking study recently published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), "A Strategy for Blood Biomarker Amplification and Localization Using Ultrasound," in which they apply low-frequency ultrasound directly to tumor cells, causing the release of significant amounts of biomarker measurable in the blood. Simultaneously, they provide a method for the localization of biomarker production by showing that this release of biomarkers is specific to the direct application of ultrasound to the tumor. Their research is featured in a recent Stanford news article by Bruce Goldman, "Researchers Use Ultrasound to Better Detect Tumor Biomarkers."

    Dr. Glazer published his study along with co-author, Sanjiv "Sam" Gambhir, MD, PhD, Virginia & D.K. Ludwig Professor of Radiology & Bioengineering; chief of the Nuclear Medicine Division; and director of the Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford (MIPS), as well as first author Aloma D'Souza, PhD, research scientist and member of the Multimodality Molecular Imaging Lab. Other co-authors include Kim Butts Pauly, PhD, professor of radiology; Samira Guccione, PhD, assistant professor of radiology; and staff scientists Jeffrey Tseng, MD (now at Santa Clara Valley Medical Center in California) and Jarrett Rosenberg, PhD, of the radiology department.

    New Staff Hires and Promotions: October 16, 2009

    Ko_Kim_100.jpgKim Ko joined our Department on August 24, 2009, as our new human resources administrator. Born and raised in O'ahu, Hawai'i, Ms. Ko moved to California a few months ago. "I knew I always wanted to move to the Bay Area," she said. "So, I was really excited when this opportunity to work at Stanford came up. There are certain comforts of home that I miss, of course, like my family and friends, but I'm really excited to begin this new chapter in my life."

    For her undergraduate education, Ms. Ko attended . . .

    the University of Hawaii, graduating in 2004 with a bachelor's in business administration and with majors in both the management of information systems and marketing. After graduation, she worked briefly as a communications analyst for Linda Lingle, the current governor of Hawai'i. Lacking a passion for politics, Ms. Ko left after five months and began working at Norwegian Cruise Line America (NCLA) as an administrative assistant in the Honolulu land office. On her first day, she was placed in the human resources department (HR) and began her career by conducting phone interviews and hiring crewmembers to staff NCLA's second cruise ship, the Pride of America.

    Working her way up the ranks at NCLA, Ms. Ko held many different positions in the HR department, which included working as an HR manager onboard each of the three American-flagged ships (the Pride of Aloha, Pride of America, and Pride of Hawai'i). "Each position was a very interesting and different experience," Ms. Ko commented. "Ship life definitely created some very interesting stories to tell! Through my employment with NCLA, I was able to take a 19-day cruise last year from San Francisco down to South America. I visited Mexico, Guatemala, Costa Rica, Ecuador, Peru, and Chile. I was able to go to Machu Picchu for a three-day adventure, and it is one of the most amazing and beautiful places I have ever been. I have also traveled to different parts of China, and visited the Great Wall and the Forbidden City. One of my life's goals is to travel to all seven continents."

    Ms. Ko's spare time is mostly devoted to surfing on the Internet, which includes keeping in touch with people on social networking sites, shopping, and learning things through Wikipedia. Back in her home state, she also used to participate in a modern dance group called Giinko Marischino, which performed at various venues across the state of Hawai'i. She hopes to find a similar group in the near vicinity to continue in the performing arts, and to refine her skills in belly dancing.

    Center for Advanced Magnetic Resonance Technology Receives a Perfect "10"

    The Stanford Radiological Sciences Laboratory (RSL) and the Department of Electrical Engineering's Magnetic Resonance Systems Research Laboratory (MRSRL) received renewal of their NIH P41 Grant for the Center for Advanced Magnetic Resonance Technology at Stanford (CAMRT). In its fifteenth year of existence, the CAMRT’s perfect grant score extends its funding through its twentieth year.

    Awards and Honors II: October 9, 2009

    KimButtsPauly.jpgKim Butts Pauly, PhD, associate professor of radiology and of Bioengineering (by courtesy), was recently elected to the board of the International Society for Therapeutic Ultrasound (ISTU) for a period of three years. The ISTU is a non-profit organization "founded in 2001 to increase and diffuse knowledge of therapeutic ultrasound to the scientific and medical community, and to facilitate the translation of therapeutic ultrasound techniques into the clinical arena for the benefit of patients worldwide." Dr. Butts Pauly's current research interests are focused on image-guided minimally invasive therapies, including MR-guided high intensity focused ultrasound and MR-guided cryoablation. She has published her work in over 75 peer-reviewed publications. When Dr. Butts Pauly is not working, she enjoys gardening, traveling with her family, and reading with her kids.

    Awards and Honors I: October 9, 2009

    Wu_100100.jpgJoseph Wu, MD, PhD, assistant professor of medicine (cardiology) and radiology, was one of four Stanford scientists to receive a National Institutes of Health (NIH) Transformative R01 Award designed to "support exceptionally innovative, high risk, original and/or unconventional research projects that have the potential to create or overturn fundamental paradigms."

    According to a recent Office of Communication & Public Affairs article, Dr. Wu's award will support his research regarding "ways to keep the body from rejecting human embryonic stem cells. For many years, researchers assumed that these undifferentiated building blocks would be ignored by the body's defense system. Wu's recent research in mice shows that this is not the case. 'It's getting harder and harder to believe that these cells are immunoprivileged,' said Wu. 'Now we need to know what to do about it.'" He will use his award to devise ways to "coax the immune system to tolerate the foreign cells, allowing them to regenerate or heal damaged tissues" (from "Stanford Nabs 13 Top NIH Awards for High-Stakes Research" by Krista Conger, Erin Digitale, Bruce Goldman, David Orenstein, Ruthann Richter, and Tracie White; download PDF at Stanford Nabs 13 Top NIH Awards for High-Stakes Research.pdf). To learn more about Dr. Wu's research, please access the Cardiovascular Gene and Cell Therapy Lab website at http://mips.stanford.edu/research/lab?lab%5fid=2883.

    Oldest Person Scanned at Stanford by Dr. Fahrig

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    (Images courtesy of Mark Riesenberger)

    By Julie Ruiz, PhD

    On August 20th, Rebecca Fahrig, PhD, directed the CT scanning of a 2,500-year-old mummy of the Egyptian Priest Iret-net Hor-irw. The high resolution CT scans were taken of the mummy in the AxiomLab and will be used . . .

    to construct three-dimensional images of his skeleton to learn more about the mummy's life and death.

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    To acquire more information about the mummy's amulets, a second scanning procedure was completed at Stanford Medicine Imaging Center, Palo Alto, (SMIC) with a dual-energy CT scanner that differentiates between different materials. Through these scans, scientists hope to learn more about the substances used in the mummification process as well as in the composition of the amulets.


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    The mummy has been a resident of the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco since 1917 and will be part of an upcoming show at the Legion of Honor Museum in an exhibition entitled, "Very Postmortem: Mummies and Medicine," which opens on Oct. 31, 2009. This exhibition is organized by the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco with the cooperation of the Akhmim Mummy Studies Consortium, Stanford Radiology, and Stanford Medicine Imaging Center. Additional project assistance has been provided by the Stanford Division of Anatomy, eHuman Inc., and Fovia Inc. To read more about the mummy, please access "The Mummy Speaks: Detailed Scans at Stanford Help Reveal the Secrets of an Ancient Egyptian Priest" and "Mummy to Be Scanned at Stanford at Aug. 20."

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    This is Dr. Fahrig's second time scanning a mummy. In 2005, she led the team who scanned a 2,000-year-old mummy of a four- or five-year old girl (nicknamed Sherit, or "little one") from the Rosicrucian Egyptian Museum in San Jose. To read more about Dr. Fahrig's work, please access "Radiologists as Artists: Critics Love Mummy Scans"; "Mummy's Inner Secrets Revealed"; "The Latest in X-Rays: A 'Mummogram'?"; and "It's a Girl: Digital Unwrapping Reveals a Little Mummy's Secrets."

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    Research by Dr. Wu and Colleagues Induces Fat Cells to Become iPS Cells

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    In a recently published paper, "Feeder-Free Derivation of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells from Adult Human Adipose Stem Cells," senior author Joseph Wu, MD, PhD, assistant professor of medicine (cardiology) and radiology, and his colleagues describe how they reprogrammed fat cells (collected from adults undergoing liposuction) to become pluripotent stem (iPS) cells for use in tissue regeneration and disease research. According to Dr. Wu, "Fibroblasts, or skin cells, must be grown in the lab for three weeks or more before they can be reprogrammed. But these stem cells from fat are ready to go right away"(from "'Liposuction Leftovers' Easily Converted to iPS Cells, Study Shows" by Krista Conger http://med.stanford.edu/ism/2009/september/fat-cells.html or Download file.

    Please click here to access the full research article "Feeder-Free Derivation of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells from Adult Human Adipose Stem Cells," (published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) 2009;106(37):15720-15725 http://www.pnas.org/content/106/37/15720.full.pdf) by Dr. Wu and his colleagues, which include co-author Michael Longaker, MD, professor of surgery (plastic/recon surgery) and (by courtesy) of bioengineering and first author Ning Sun, PhD, postdoctoral scholar in the Cardiovascular Gene and Cell Therapy Lab.


    Visiting Scholar Ronald M. Summers, MD, PhD

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    Stanford Radiology welcomes Ronald M. Summers, MD, PhD, who is on sabbatical leave from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) Department of Radiology where he serves as chief of the clinical image processing service and directs the Imaging Biomarkers and Computer-Aided Diagnosis (CAD) Laboratory.

    Dr. Summers received his BA degree in physics and his MD and PhD degrees in medicine/anatomy & cell biology from the University of Pennsylvania. He completed a medical internship at the Presbyterian-University of Pennsylvania Hospital, Philadelphia, PA; a radiology residency at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI; and an MRI fellowship at Duke University, Durham, NC.

    In 1994, he joined the Diagnostic Radiology Department at the NIH Clinical Center in Bethesda, MD, where he is now a tenured senior investigator and staff radiologist. His clinical areas of specialty are thoracic and gastrointestinal radiology as well as body cross-sectional imaging, and his research interests include virtual colonoscopy, CAD, and the development of large radiologic image databases. Dr. Summers is a co-chair of the Computer-Aided Diagnosis Program and program committee member of the Biomedical Applications Section of the annual Society of Photographic Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE) Medical Imaging Conference. His many awards and honors include the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers, which was presented to him in 2000 by Dr. Neal Lane, former President Clinton's science advisor. In addition, Dr. Summers has co-authored over 190 journal publications, review articles, and conference proceedings, and he is a co-inventor on eight patents. In his spare time, Dr. Summers enjoys traveling and photography.

    Dr. Sze: A Man in a Surgical Cap

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    If you look up as you walk past the Lucas Center towards the Center for Clinical Sciences Research (CCSR), you will see a photo of Dr. Dan Sze in surgical scrubs on a banner dedicated to patient care. The author of a recent SOM article entitled, "Banner Season to Mark 50th Anniversary," describes Dr. Sze's banner as "a man in a surgical cap." The banner with Dr. Sze's photo is one of six designs commemorating the Medical Center's move in 1959 from San Francisco to Palo Alto and marking the Center's 50th anniversary. In addition to the Medical Center, banners are also located on the perimeter of the Medical Center along Pasteur Drive and Welch Road as well as on lampposts along El Camino Real in Palo Alto. Already featured at alumni events and commencement, they will remain on display until early October. In the near future, the banner designs will be displayed on bookmarks. To read more, please access http://med.stanford.edu/ism/2009/august/brief-banners-0812.html or Download file.

    Awards and Honors II: September 23, 2009

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    Scott W. Atlas, MD, professor and chief of neuroradiology and senior fellow at both the Hoover Institution and Freeman-Spogli Institute for International Studies, has received an international honor on September 12, 2009, at the Annual Meeting of the Sociedade de Radiologia de Pernambuco in Recife, Brazil, for his "important contributions to radiology and to education in Brazil."

    Dr. Atlas is recognized as a world leader in both education and clinical research and has been on the Nominating Committee for the Nobel Prize in Medicine and Physiology for several years. His research has centered on advanced applications of new MRI technologies in neurologic diseases, and he has authored more than 120 scientific publications in leading journals. Dr. Atlas is also the editor of the best-selling textbook Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Brain and Spine, which was recently released in its 4th edition and officially translated from English into Mandarin, Spanish, and Portuguese. He is also editor, associate editor, and an editorial board member of numerous scientific journals, and he has been a member of the boards of many major national and international scientific societies over the past decade. In recognition of his leadership in the field, Dr. Atlas has received many awards and honors. He has been named by his peers in The Best Doctors in America every year since its initial publication, as well as in regional listings, such as The Best Doctors in New York, Silicon Valley's Best Doctors, and other similar publications. He recently received the Alumni 2008 Comeback Award from his alma mater, the University of Illinois in Urbana-Champaign.

    In addition, Dr. Atlas' work includes investigations into the effects of the changing healthcare marketplace on technology-based innovations in medicine, and he has lectured throughout the world on a variety of topics, most notably advances in MRI of the brain, and the key economic issues related to the future of such technology-based advances. During the 2008 Presidential Campaign, Dr. Atlas was a senior advisor for health care and the coordinator of the Health Policy Team for one of the major U.S. presidential candidates. At the Freeman-Spogli Institute for International Studies, he has particular interests in the evolving healthcare system of emerging economies, and he recently received a Fulbright Award to collaborate with Chinese academic leaders on structuring healthcare solutions for China. Dr. Atlas has also participated with leaders from government and academia on the World Bank's Commission on Growth and Development, and he is an adviser to major industry leaders in medical technology.

    To read his prior blog articles, please access "Awards and Honors: March-April 2007"; "Awards and Honors: September 29, 2008"; "Sanford/Atlas: Alternatives to Government Health Takeover"; "Dr. Atlas' Commentary on Our Healthcare System Featured in The Washington Times"; and "Commentary by Dr. Atlas: 'Mr. Health Care: Ted Kennedy's Lifelong Passion' and 'Why Are These Health Care Fixes Ignored?'"

    Awards and Honors I: September 23, 2009

    pratx.gifGuillem Pratx, PhD, doctoral candidate in electrical engineering and member of the Molecular Imaging Instrumentation Laboratory, recently published an article in Physics in Medicine and Biology entitled "Bayesian Reconstruction of Photon Interaction Sequences for High-Resolution PET Detectors," which has been selected as a Featured Article by the editors of the Institute of Physics Journals. Dr. Pratx's article was chosen for its "novelty, high level of interest and potential impact on future research." To view his article, please access http://www.iop.org/EJ/abstract/-featured=jnl/0031-9155/54/17/001.

    Dr. Pratx completed his undergraduate work in engineering at the Ecole Centrale in Paris, France. At Stanford (MIPS), he is completing his dissertation esearch, which centers on the development of practical algorithms hat exploit graphics processing units (GPU) for fast medical image reconstruction in ultra-high resolution PET systems under development at the University. For more details regarding his biography, please see Dr. Pratx's earlier award postings by accessing "Awards and Honors: August 2, 2007"; " Awards and Honors: December 17, 2007"; "Awards and Honors II: December 5, 2008"; and "Awards and Honors II: July 18, 2008."


    Medical Students Need Earlier Exposure to Radiology According to Drs. Desser and Hovsepian

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    Although radiology still remains among the top 10 specialty choices, it has fallen from fifth to ninth, according to the National Residency Matching Program. In "Early Radiology Exposure Could Lure Medical Students to Specialty" from the August 2009 RSNA News, Terry Desser, MD, professor of radiology and residency program director, and David Hovsepian, MD, professor of radiology as well as chief quality and safety officer, describe the causes of decreasing interest in radiology while offering solutions.

    According to Dr. Hovsepian, the diminished appeal of radiology as a career choice among medical students is due in part to "students' misperceptions about what radiologists actually do and the central role that we often play in patient care." One solution is to expose medical students early on to radiology, as Dr. Desser describes: "We need to be the ones teaching them anatomy and about imaging and manifestations of pathophysiology on imaging early on in their training, so they recognize what we do and what we contribute." To read the full article, please access http://www.rsna.org/Publications/rsnanews/August-2009/early_exposure_feature.cfm or Download file.


    Dr. Sandy Napel Plays the Aquaphone on "West Coast Live"

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    When he bought tickets to be in the audience of the radio variety show "West Coast Live," Dr. Napel didn't expect to become part of the show. Neither did he anticipate being featured in the first sentence of an article from the San Francisco Chronicle entitled "West Coast Live': A Glimpse of Old-Time Radio"! But when the radio show host, Sedge Thomson, asked for audience volunteers to play the Aquaphone onstage, Dr. Napel couldn't resist volunteering to play the instrument, which is a special effect used to open the radio show that sounds similar to the noise of swimming in the bay. After working with state-of-the-art, high tech equipment at Stanford, playing the Aquaphone on live radio was a welcomed change for Dr. Napel, who left the show, according to "West Coast Live': A Glimpse of Old-Time Radio", "with his wife and teenage daughter . . . in the glow of old-time radio." To read the full article, please access http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/c/a/2009/08/14/DD2H18NMVE.DTL or Download file.

    Medical Imaging: The Good, the Bad & the Ugly

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    Dr. Pat Basu's article "Medical Imaging: The Good, the Bad & the Ugly" was recently featured in Kaiser Health News and addresses the optimization of medical imaging. To read his article, please access http://www.kaiserhealthnews.org/Columns/2009/August/081309Basu.aspx or Download file.

    2009 Fourth Annual Japanese Technologist Summer Training Program

    By Mike Moseley, PhD

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    (photo courtesy of Mark Riesenberger)

    From August 3rd-7th, Stanford Radiology held its fourth annual Japanese Technologist Summer Training Program, a joint educational program in partnership with the Japanese Society of Radiological Technology (JSRT). As in previous years, we had 24 JSRT participants visit for the week, with technical lectures in the morning; tours and workshops in the afternoon; and social activities such as Giants' baseball, a tour of SMIC, shopping, and biking. For the brave of the bunch, Dr. Deb Ikeda once again led a dawn charge up to the Stanford Dish. The lectures were well received (many thanks to everyone who participated!). The highlight of the week was the reception at the new Stanford Medicine Imaging Center, Palo Alto, which gave the JSRT members an opportunity to meet and speak with many of our technologists. The Summer Training Program is a great way to introduce ourselves to the international radiology community, while building strong collaborations and more efficient practices in radiology worldwide. Many thanks again to our speakers and to everyone who spent so much time and effort to make this an ongoing success.

    New Residents for 2009!

    We are excited to welcome our new residents, who began in July 2009! To learn more about our first-year residents, please find some of their biographies along with their photos below.

    Ed Boas, MD, PhD
    Veronica Cox, MD
    Sarah Garaas, MD
    Theodore Jerdee, MD
    Tim Joseph, MD
    Marnie Kremer, MD
    Andreas Loening, MD, PhD
    Nicholas Telischak, MD, MS
    Jonathan Williams, MD

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    Ed was born in Taiwan and grew up in San Diego. He received his undergraduate degree from Harvard and then entered the Stanford MD/PhD program. After graduating, he spent a year completing a general surgery internship before starting in radiology. Ed likes to build things and loves the thrill of making something new and useful. Some of his recent projects include developing an algorithm for reducing metal streak artifacts in CT scans and creating a method for designing custom binding proteins. At Stanford, he plans to pursue interventional radiology and develop new medical devices.



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    Veronica is a lifetime Californian, who hails from the backwoods of rural Mendocino County. She grew up playing outside in the redwood forests and cooking-up amateur science fair projects in her backyard. Her "research" of "mudslides" brought home many prizes from the California State Science Fair, where she was also named "Most Promising Future Scientist." Veronica is very close to her three sisters, all of whom have also attended Stanford University at one time or another. Prior to entering the Radiology Residency Program at Stanford, she attended the University of California, Berkeley, as an undergraduate, followed by medical school at the University of California, San Diego. In her spare time, Veronica enjoys painting, listening to classic rock, and spending time with her new niece.



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    Tim Joseph is a true Californian. He attended the University of California, Los Angeles, for his BS, and then ventured northward where he attained his MD degree at the University of California, San Francisco. He returned to his hometown of San Diego to complete his internship, and made the return trip back to Stanford to complete his radiology residency. Tim is an avid sports fan (Lakers!), and traveler; he also LOVES eating all kinds of foods.



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    Marnie grew up in Fargo, North Dakota, and stayed in the Midwest to attain her bachelor of science degree in nutritional science from the University of Minnesota, Minneapolis. She went on to complete her medical degree at the University of Maryland School of Medicine in Baltimore, Maryland, where she also received her Certificate in Medical Sonography. This past year, she returned to Fargo, North Dakota, for her internship at the University of North Dakota. Marnie enjoys camping, hiking, running, volleyball, and travel.



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    Andy Loening (sounds like "Learning') grew up in Iowa City, and then headed to Boston to study electrical engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). After completing his undergraduate degree, he decided to check out the west coast, earning his MD/PhD here at Stanford. Continuing his slow westward migration, Andy finished his transitional internship at the University of Hawaii. He enjoys backpacking, guitar, fermented grain products, indie rock, and what he calls "dorking out" on his computer. Andy has also recently taken up surfing.



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    Nick grew up in the Bay Area but left for New England to study mechanical engineering at Tufts University. He attended Dartmouth Medical School where he met his wife, Kristen. Having tasted life at Stanford while pursuing a master's degree in bioengineering, Nick has returned for his radiology residency. According to Nick, he "dragged his wife, a lifelong New Englander, kicking and screaming" to San Francisco where she is a surgical intern at the University of California, San Francisco. When he is not in a dark room, Nick is bicycling, running, swimming, or trying to find the perfect margarita.

    Awards and Honors: August 11, 2009

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    Sandra Rodriguez, BS R(RT)(MR), MR research technologist, has been awarded the UPS Foundation Scholarship from the Hispanic Scholarship Fund. This scholarship is awarded on a competitive basis to assist students, who have a minimum cumulative grade point average (GPA) of 3.0, in obtaining their educational objectives. Ms. Rodriguez earned her Bachelor of Science in Health Administration (BSHA) in an online program through the University of Phoenix in September of 2008. She is currently enrolled in the Master's Program in Health Administration and will receive her degree in November 2010. As an MRI technologist at the Lucas Center, Ms. Rodriguez helps users set-up for their studies and facilitates their scans, providing support whenever necessary. She also does quality assurance on our three scanners and makes sure they are running smoothly. In her free time, Ms. Rodriguez enjoys cardio kickboxing; reading; and trying to keep up with a teenage girl (her daughter).

    For her prior awards listings, please access http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2008/04/awards_and_hono_35.html and http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2007/04/awards_and_hono_1.html.

    Did You Know?

    Number of Radiology Departments in Top U.S. Medical Schools in 1913
    As ranked by the Council on Medical Education of the American Medical Association, only 4 of the top 18 U.S. medical colleges in 1913 recognized Roentgenology as a distinct "Department of Instruction": Northwestern University, Harvard University, Cornell University, and the University and Bellevue Hospital Medical College (from "Medical Colleges of the United States: Annual Presentation of Educational Data by the Council on Medical Education in J Am Med Assoc1913;61(8):569-598 and quoted in "Instruction in Roentgenology" by Adolph Henriques and Lodilla Ambrose, JAMA 1914;V.LXIII;N.8:651-653).

    The Council chose the top or "A+" 18 U.S. medical colleges by . . .

    rating all medical schools on a scale of 1,000 points based on 10 criteria each worth 100 points (please see criteria listed below). Class A+ colleges were those that earned an "acceptable" rating based on these 10 criteria (to read more, please access "Medical Colleges of the United States: Annual Presentation of Educational Data by the Council on Medical Education" in J Am Med Assoc 1913;61(8):598).

    10 Criteria:
    1. Showing of graduates before state boards and other evidences
    of the training received.
    2. Enforcement of a satisfactory preliminary educational requirement,
    granting of advanced standing, and the character of records.
    3. Character of curriculum, grading of course, length of session, and
    time allowed for matriculation and supervision.
    4. Medical school buildings: light, heat, ventilation, cleanliness.
    5. Laboratory facilities and Instruction.
    6. Dispensary facilities and Instruction.
    7. Hospital facilities and Instruction, maternity work, autopsies, and specialties.
    8. Faculty, number, and qualifications of trained teachers, full-time
    instructors, and assistants, especially of the laboratory branches, organization, and extent of research work.
    9. Extent to which the school is conducted for properly teaching
    the science of medicine rather than for the profit of the faculty
    directly or indirectly.
    10. Possession and use made of libraries, museums, charts, and stereopticons.

    Awards and Honors: July 28, 2009

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    Avnesh S. Thakor, MA, MB Bchir, PhD, a visiting scholar in the Multimodality Molecular Imaging Lab, has been awarded an American Cancer Society International Fellowship for Beginning Investigators (ACSBI) from the International Union Against Cancer (UICC) for his research on Raman spectroscopy using SERS nanoparticles. One goal of ACSBI fellowships is to foster a bi-directional flow of research knowledge, experience, expertise, and innovation between countries. Dr. Thakor was awarded ACSBI fellowship for his research on Raman spectroscopy using SERS nanoparticles.

    Dr. Thakor completed his PhD, in oxidative stress and vascular physiology, and his medical degree at the University of Cambridge. Currently, he is pursuing an MSc in cancer therapeutics at the University of London during his radiology residency. At Stanford, Dr. Thakor is applying his knowledge in oxidative stress and vascular biology to the molecular imaging of tumor biology. He has 20 published articles and over 30 peer-reviewed abstracts. In addition to the American Cancer Society International Fellowship, Dr. Thakor has received numerous other honors, including a 2009 European Association for Cancer Research Fellowship, 2008 British Institute of Radiology Philips Fellowship, and 2008 PEEL Medical Research Award.

    Awards and Honors: July 24, 2009

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    John Ronald, PhD, a post doctoral scholar in the Multimodality Molecular Imaging Lab (MMIL), has received a Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) Fellowship, which is a three-year award that provides support for highly qualified candidates to complete health research either in Canada or abroad. Dr. Ronald received the Fellowship for his proposal, "Multimodality Cell Trafficking Imaging Using Optical Bioluminescent Imaging, Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)."

    Dr. Ronald received his BSc in physiology from the University of Western Ontario (UWO), graduating with honors. He remained at UWO to complete his MSc in anatomy and cell biology and his PhD thesis, "Magnetic Resonance Imaging Characterization of a Cholesterol-Fed Rabbit Model of Atherosclerosis and Alzheimer's Disease," in medical biophysics. Prior to coming to Stanford in June of 2009, Dr. Ronald was a postdoctoral scholar at the University of Western Ontario in anatomy and cell biology. As a member of the MMIL, Dr. Ronald researches new techniques for improving the ability to non-invasively track cells or cell products in various diseases, particularly atherosclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, and cancer.

    The Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) Fellowship is just one of his many awards, which include the 2009 Canadian Governor General's Academic Gold Medal. He has also published over 10 peer-reviewed papers and more than 25 peer-reviewed abstracts.

    In addition to his research, Dr. Ronald enjoys traveling, reading, poker, movies, golf, soccer, and rollerblading.

    Awards and Honors: July 23, 2009

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    Qizhen Cao, PhD, postdoctoral scholar in the Molecular Imaging Probe Laboratory, received a Travel Award to attend the 56th Society of Nuclear Medicine's Annual Meeting in Toronto, Canada from June 13th to June 17th, where she presented her study, "Phage Display Peptide Probes for Imaging Early Response to Antiangiogenic Treatment." Because her project demonstrates novel advances in molecular imaging, Dr. Cao's abstract was also chosen for presentation at the Basic Science Summary Session of the SNM. She received her PhD in molecular and immunological pharmacology from the Peking University Health Science Center in China, where she specialized in tumor angiogenesis and anti-angiogenesis therapy. In 2005, she joined Dr. Shawn Chen's laboratory, where she develops molecular imaging probes for the treatment monitoring and target therapy of tumor angiogenesis.

    Announcements: July 23, 2009

    Stanford Summer Theater (SST) Electra Festival: July 23rd-August 15th at Memorial Auditorium. Stanford Summer Theater (SST) presents the Electra Festival, which explores one of the great mythic heroines through theater and film. The Festival begins on July 23rd and ends on August 15th and runs Thursdays through Saturdays at 8:00 PM with a Sunday matinee on August 9th at 2:00 PM. All events are at the Memorial Auditorium, Stanford University. For tickets and other information, please click here, call 650-725-5838, or stanfordsummertheater@gmail.com.

    Awards and Honors: July 21, 2009

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    Anne Marie Sawyer, BS, RT(R)(MR), manager of the MR Whole Body Research Systems at the Richard M. Lucas Center for Imaging, has been appointed as member of the Food and Drug Administration's Circulatory System Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee. The Circulatory System Devices Panel "reviews and evaluates data concerning the safety and effectiveness of marketed and investigational devices for use in the circulatory and vascular systems and makes appropriate recommendations to the Commissioner of Food and Drugs." Ms. Sawyer was appointed to this panel in recognition of her enduring contributions to the safe and efficient operation of MR systems.

    She began her career in magnetic resonance imaging in September of 1985 as . . .

    an MR applications specialist for GE Medical Systems providing education on-site for customers with new installations and system upgrades. In 1987 and 1990, respectively, she served as supervisor (MR) and then manager (MR, CT, X-ray, nuclear medicine, and mammography) for applications specialists in the western region of the United States. In 1991, Ms. Sawyer became a member of MR Advanced Applications and Customer Support at GE Medical Systems headquarters in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, where her primary responsibilities included assistance in the design and implementation of software, hardware, and imaging accessories; support for pre-product clinical evaluations; customer education; organization and direction of educational symposia; and development of educational material and tools.

    In 1993, Ms. Sawyer began in the Stanford Department of Radiology as the manager of MR Whole Body Research Systems in the Radiological Sciences Laboratory at the Richard M. Lucas Center for Imaging. For over 16 years, she has provided technical, scientific, and educational consultation to researchers, as well as assistance in the design and direction of research studies conducted at the Lucas Center on the 1.5T, 3.0T#1, 3.0T#2 and 7.0T whole body MR systems. To support Lucas users and distribute MR-specific documentation, she maintains a website of her own design and conducts Stanford MR technologist symposia.

    Ms. Sawyer has been a member of the Section for MR Technologists (SMRT) of the International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine (ISMRM) since 1991 and has served as past president as well as chair and member of numerous committees. Because of her dedication to SMRT, she has been honored with elevation to Fellow of the Section and with the prestigious Honorary Membership of the SMRT in recognition of her major achievements in the field of magnetic resonance imaging. She is currently the editor of the SMRT accredited Home Study Program, Educational Seminars. Her published articles include over 50 peer-reviewed publications. In addition, she has delivered more than 50 invited lectures and co-authored three book chapters. Among Ms. Sawyer's numerous awards are the Crues-Kressel Award from the SMRT for her outstanding contributions to MR technologist education and a 3rd Place Poster Award at the 2006 Annual ISMRM Meeting. As manager of our Lucas magnet systems, she is nationally consulted regarding all aspects of MR safety and systems operation.

    Awards and Honors: July 20, 2009

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    Christoph Lee, MD, has been named 1 of only 29 Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Clinical Scholars for 2010-2012, a highly prestigious and extremely competitive two-year fellowship in health policy. Through the Fellowship, outstanding young physicians "conduct innovative research and work with communities, organizations, practitioners and policymakers on issues important to the health and well-being of all Americans." Dr. Lee is the only radiologist to have been selected this year and is one of very few radiologists selected to participate since the beginning of the program in 1969. To read the press release announcing his award, please access http://rwjcsp.unc.edu/resources/pressreleases/2010-12_CSP_New_Scholars.pdf or Download file.


    Dr. Lee earned his BA, graduating cum laude, from Princeton University, and received his MD from Yale University where he also graduated cum laude. He is currently completing his residency in diagnostic radiology at Stanford University. Prior to coming to Stanford, Dr. Lee managed a global tuberculosis initiative for Ralph Nader in Washington, D.C., and was an analyst for the Lewin Group, a national healthcare policy research and consulting firm. He has helped lead more than 10 different service organizations at the community, state, national, and international levels over the last decade. In addition, Dr. Lee is the author of multiple medical board review texts distributed internationally by McGraw-Hill & Co., and he is the first author of several original research articles regarding medical imaging health policy, which are published in leading peer-reviewed journals. Dr. Lee has also served on several national editorial and executive boards and is a recipient of numerous research and leadership awards, including the 2009 American Medical Association Foundation Leadership Award. As a Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholar, Dr. Lee plans to examine diagnostic imaging from the perspectives of cost effectiveness, clinical effectiveness, and resource utilization. For his prior blog award, please access http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2009/03/awards_and_hono_82.html.

    Awards and Honors: July 17, 2009

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    Andrei Iagaru, MD; Erik Mittra, MD, PhD; and Michael Goris, MD, PhD, have received the 2009 Society of Nuclear Medicine Image of the Year Award for their image comprised of two sets of before-and-after PET scans of two patients, one of whom was treated with Iodine-131 tositumomab, and the other, with Yttrium-90 ibritumomab tiuxetan. The scans examine the effectiveness of two radioimmunotherapy agents in treating non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). To view the image, please access http://interactive.snm.org/img/SNM-2009-Image-of-the-Year.jpg. Please see biographies for Drs. Iagaru and Mittra below.


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    Andrei Iagaru, MD, instructor of nuclear medicine, completed medical school at the Carol Davila University of Medicine, Bucharest, Romania, and an internship at Drexel University College of Medicine, Graduate Hospital, in the Department of Medicine. He began his residency at the University of Southern California (USC) Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles, in the Division of Nuclear Medicine, where he was the chief resident. He finished his residency and completed a PET/CT fellowship at Stanford University's School of Medicine in the Division of Nuclear Medicine. He is currently an Instructor in the Department of Radiology and his current research interests include whole-Body MRI and PET/CT for early cancer detection; Zevalin/Bexxar radioimmunotherapy; optical imaging of breast cancer; clinical translation of novel PET radiopharmaceuticals; and PET-CT imaging for thyroid/breast cancers, melanoma, lymphoma, and sarcoma. For his prior blog posting, please access http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2009/05/awards_and_hono_91.html and http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2008/07/awards_and_hono_47.html.


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    Erik Mittra, MD, PhD, instructor of nuclear medicine, attended Stony Brook University Medical Scientist Training Program where he received his MD and PhD degrees in biomedical engineering as well as a master's degree in the anatomical sciences. After completing his internship in the Department of Internal Medicine at Stony Brook University Hospital, he finished his residency and fellowship in the Division of Nuclear Medicine at Stanford University Hospital and Clinics. In addition to the 2009 Society of Nuclear Medicine Image of the Year Award, Dr. Mittra has received the 2007 Radiological Society of North America Trainee Research Prize (co-author); was awarded 2007 Norman D. Poe Memorial Scholarship Award for Outstanding In-Training Oral Abstract at the 32nd Annual Western Regional Society of Nuclear Medicine Meeting (co-winner); and served as the Chief Nuclear Medicine Resident for 2007-2008. He has also published over 10 published manuscripts and 25 abstracts.


    Awards and Honors: July 14, 2009

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    Laura Sasportas, PhD candidate in the Multimodality Molecular Imaging Laboratory, has been awarded a Student Fellowship Award by the Society of Nuclear Medicine . She received this award for her proposal, "In Vivo Molecular Imaging of Circulating Tumor Cells and Early Invasion in a Human Cancer-Stem Cell Based Model of Breast Tumor." SNM Student Fellowship Awards support full-time participation in clinical and basic research activities for students who demonstrate outstanding competence in nuclear medicine and/or molecular imaging research.

    A native of Strasbourg, France, Laura Sasportas completed two years of math and physics studies at the bachelor's degree level before entering Ecole Centrale Paris, which is a multidisciplinary engineering school. She was then selected for the Top Industrial Managers for Europe (T.I.M.E.) master's double degree program, Europe's leading network for the training of bi-cultural and bilingual engineers. In 2007, Ms. Sasportas received a Master of Science Engineering Diploma from the Ecole Centrale Paris, and a Master of Science in Biomedical Engineering from the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH Zurich). At ETH Zurich, she specialized in bioimaging, magnetic resonance imaging, and molecular imaging. Dr. Sasportas completed her master's thesis at the Harvard Medical School Center for Molecular Imaging Research (MGH) in Boston, Massachusetts. Her thesis aimed at developing and imaging in vivo an anti-angiogenic therapy for malignant brain tumors using human neural stem cells as a delivery vehicle.

    In 2008, Ms. Sasportas worked as a scientific associate at the Novartis Institute for Biomedical Research/Center for Proteomics Chemistry on the lead discovery platform in Basel, Switzerland. She was in charge of cell-line engineering and support of the imaging-based cellular assay development for high-throughput drug screening. Later that year, Ms. Sasportas was also awarded an International Fulbright Science and Technology Award grant to pursue a PhD in bioengineering at Stanford University, where she is currently enrolled.

    Her hobbies include literature, theater, drawing, painting, swimming, hiking, and traveling.

    Stanford Radiology Welcomes Visiting Scholar Dr. Emilio Sacristan

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    Emilio Sacristan, PhD, has joined the Lucas Center as a visiting professor for the 2009 calendar year. He is on sabbatical leave from the Metropolitan University in Iztapalapa, Mexico City, where he is a professor of biomedical engineering and the director of the Mexican National Center for Medical Instrumentation and Imaging Research. Dr. Sacristan was formerly a faculty member at the University of Massachusetts Medical School, Yale University, and Worcester Polytechnic Institute, where he also received his PhD in biomedical engineering. In addition, he is an entrepreneur, having founded Abdeo Medical and Critical Perfusion Inc., two Bay Area companies for which he also serves as a science advisor. While at Stanford, Dr. Sacristan is working with Dr. Dan Spielman's group, using hyperpolarized 13C to study ischemia-reperfusion of the gut in rats.

    Dr. Sacristan has two daughters who are visiting the United States along with him and his wife, who is also a visiting scholar at Stanford. She is researching the epidemiology of mental health in adolescents with colleagues in the Psychology Department.

    Meet Our SHC Radiologic Nurses

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    (L to R): Rachel Reyes RN, BSN, CEN; Selma Samayoa, RN, BSN, CCRN; Harmandeep (Harm) Madra, RN; Diane Herscher, RN; and Jo Miser, RN, BSN (not all nurses are pictured)

    By Julie Ruiz, PhD

    A relatively new field, radiologic nursing began at Stanford Hospital and Clinics (SHC) around late 1994 or early 1995 with one nurse, Stephanie Taylan, RN, who assisted mainly with computed tomography (CT) examinations. Today, our radiologic nursing team has grown to 15 nurses whose efforts are greatly improving patient care. Our nurses increase patient comfort through a focus on the whole patient, sedating patients for procedures (rather than merely administering a local anesthetic); assisting with contrast injections for patients undergoing CT and MRI exams; tracking patient labs; administering medications, such anti-anxiety drugs; and providing critical care for patients who may have allergic reactions or other complications. They also help keep everyone updated on the latest contrast injection techniques and the most modern types of central lines.

    The increase in our radiologic nursing staff is partly due to the rapid growth in interventional radiologic (IR) procedures, particularly CT-guided IR examinations that require moderate sedation. Our nurses lend their skills to these IR procedures by starting IVs in patients and assessing their progress as well as by administering moderate sedation.

    In the future, radiologic nurses will most likely be involved in areas such as gastrointestinal imaging and ultrasound. Already, our nurses assist with image-guided platelet rich plasma injections by drawing patients' blood and spinning it to separate the platelets so that a physician can inject them into the site of injury to promote healing. The radiologic nursing team will also be hosting an educational conference this August 2009 to educate hospital nurses about radiology. The objective of the conference is to provide information not being taught in nursing schools, which provide very few classes in radiology and very little information on how to assist in radiologic examinations.

    Of our 15 radiologic nurses, 9 serve patients at SHC while the other 6 are distributed evenly between Blake Wilbur; Stanford Medicine Imaging Center (SMIC), Palo Alto; and Stanford Outpatient Imaging Center (SMOC), Redwood City. To learn more about some of our team members, . . .

    please read their biographies below.

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    Harmandeep (Harm) Madra, RN, patient care manager, went to nursing school in British Columbia and chose nursing because he was inspired by his sister, who is also a nurse. He began his career in nursing working in the medical surgical units of a small community hospital and later, transferred to the emergency room (ER) and intensive care unit (ICU). In 2000, he decided to move to Palo Alto and applied for a nursing position in the Stanford Hospital and Clinics (SHC) ER and was hired. After six months, Mr. Madra was promoted to night assistant nurse manager, and eventually earned a specialty certificate in ER nursing. In early 2006, he decided he needed a change and joined the Radiology Department because he felt it was time to learn something new in a nursing field that was just emerging. It was challenging learning the new work flows and different examinations, but very rewarding. At Stanford, Mr. Madra is helping to develop the field of radiologic nursing. Along with the American Radiological Nurses Association (ARNA), he co-sponsored Stanford's first symposium in radiologic nursing in October of 2008, which attracted about 80 attendees from all over the Bay Area. His future plans include furthering his management career by completing his MBA at the College of Notre Dame in Belmont.


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    Dave Allan, RN, earned his nursing diploma in Glasgow, Scotland. He chose nursing because he wanted to work in a field where he could contribute by giving something back: "I took a job as an orderly in a cancer hospital after high school and from that experience, I migrated into a nursing program." After many years of serving as a nurse in the ER, ICU, and cardiac cath lab, Mr. Allan was looking for a change, and radiologic nursing seemed like a natural progression based on his background. So, after arriving at Stanford Hospital and Clinics in 2004 and working in the cath labs, he switched to Radiology in early 2006, and is now working at our newly opened Stanford Medicine Outpatient Center (SMOC) in Redwood City. His work is not without its challenges, which include successfully acquiring venous access in patients who are more anxious about getting intravenous contrast than the scan itself: "Because three-quarters of the exams we perform involve intravenous contrast, it's a skill that radiologic nurses have to master." Mr. Allan's work also involves trying to make the process less threatening and more comfortable for all patients, especially those who are receiving difficult diagnoses. Because of the patient-centered environment at SMOC, he is able to have quality interactions with the patients and their families and to provide information and educational resources to his patients. The greatest changes Mr. Allan has seen after more than 35 years in nursing include the rapid expansion of technology, greatly improved quality of imaging, and stunning image-guided noninvasive interventions. When he isn't working, Mr. Allan enjoys reading.


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    Patty, BSN, received her bachelor's of science in nursing from California State University at Fresno. She became interested in nursing because she loves to travel and meet people, and she began her career as a telemetry nurse in Roseville, CA. After a couple of years, Patty decided to cross-train as an emergency/trauma nurse and then moved to San Diego. Heightening her career as an emergency nurse, Patty started to travel through the opportunity provided by a local nursing company. In July of 2007, she was hired as a CT/body scanner nurse at Stanford Hospital and Clinics, where she was initially referred to as the "trailer nurse" because she worked with the mobile CT scanner located in a trailer. The transition from emergency to radiologic nursing was a welcomed change: "Having worked in California, Hawaii, and Boston, I had the opportunity to care for a variety of patients from different cultural backgrounds. SHC fits the international profile. I am so impressed with the high standards of patient care and diagnostic research being done in radiology." Patty is proud to be part of a superior medical facility and demonstrates professional nursing practice to all inpatients and outpatients requiring CT intervention. "I try to make the process as comfortable as possible when each patient comes in for a CT scan. I know when they leave the scan smiling or saying 'thank you,' I've accomplished a huge task, which means so much to them. I want to live up to Stanford's reputation by providing superior patient care, and I'm glad to be part of the team." Being part of a world-class Hospital has its challenges. Because the improvements in patient care occur so rapidly, there are always new protocols to learn and new patient-care techniques to implement. According to Patty, the future of radiologic nursing is moving towards more minimally invasive interventional radiologic procedures because they reduce the recovery time for patients and are cost effective. When she's not working, she loves to travel, hike, run, and spend time with her friends. Her future goal is to travel to third-world countries to set up healthcare clinics.


    Cristina Cosim, BSN, RN, graduated from nursing school in the Philippines and began her nursing career in New York. Wanting to be closer to her family, she found work in 1987 at Stanford Hospital and Clinics (SHC). Cristina first worked in the E2ICU for four years and then in the Ambulatory Surgery Center (ASC) Perioperative Post Anesthesia Care Unit (PACU) (recovery room). Desiring a change after 21 years at Stanford, Cristina transferred to SHC Radiology in July of 2008. She has enjoyed learning a whole new set of policies and procedures that were different from those she had acquired in the recovery room and ICU, and she relishes the variety radiologic nursing provides: "There's a multitude of patient interactions on the job, and I also get to work with a great group of technologists. I've learned a lot from them, and we couldn't get the job done without them." When she's not working, Cristina enjoys movies, reading, and watching sports, including tennis, football, baseball, and, especially, golf--mainly because she is a Tiger Woods' fan.

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    Marietta Escalona, RN, BSN, CEN (Certified Emergency Nurse), CRN (Certified Radiologic Nurse), graduated from St. Luke's College of Nursing in Quezon City in the Philippines. Her background is in telemetry/emergency nursing. Prior to coming to Stanford in September of 2006, she worked as a staff nurse at St. Mary's Medical Center, San Francisco, in emergency nursing and at the University of California, San Francisco, (UCSF) in interventional radiology. She continues to work at UCSF, while serving at Stanford. As a radiologic nurse, Ms. Escalona finds a new challenge every day by navigating difficult issues with patients' procedures and studies as well as doing all sorts of tasks not directly related to nursing: "It makes me feel good that my patients are getting better from their illnesses, and it makes me feel great when patients, family members, and colleagues express their appreciation for my hard work on their behalf." Because of her exceptional work in nursing, she was awarded the 2008 Betty Cretekos Scholarship Award by Friends of Nursing, a nonprofit organization that promotes professional excellence in nursing practice at Stanford by providing nurses with tuition or travel scholarships to attend national professional meetings. Ms. Escalona received her award at the SHC Holiday Tree Lighting Ceremony. This past March, she used the funds provided by her Betty Cretekos Scholarship to travel to the Society of Interventional Radiology Annual Conference and the Association for Radiological and Imaging Nursing Annual Conference in San Diego, California.

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    Diane Herscher, RN, was inspired to go into nursing by her daughter, who had cancer at the age of nine but recovered from it within two years: "It was a remarkable recovery and after experiencing all the struggles and triumphs, I chose to go into ER nursing. My daughter is now a nurse in the ER unit that I left." Ms. Herscher is from Chicago, where she has nine grandchildren, all under the age of five, and four adult children. During her career, she has also worked as a clinical director at a hospital in Alabama; served as a paramedic; and organized her own occupational healthcare agency. However, nursing remains her career of choice: "Nursing is different for me. It's important to me to make patients feel warm by doing small things that make them feel special like placing a warm blanket around their shoulders." While working as an ER nurse in Sacramento, Ms. Herscher was recruited to Stanford by Mr. Madra and has been working at Stanford since February 9, 2009: "I like Harm's leadership, so I decided to take the challenge and enter radiologic nursing, which is a whole new field for me. I enjoy the challenge of learning many new skills. The radiologic nursing staff at SHC feels like a family to me, and it's a great place to work because everyone cares about each other." When she's not working, Ms. Herscher enjoys being outdoors: hiking, water skiing, snow skiing, and boating.

    Colleen Kawakami, RN, BSN, earned her bachelor's degree at the University of
    California, San Francisco. Before coming to SHC, she worked in the Hematology/Oncology/ Bone Marrow Transplant (BMT) clinic at Lucile Packard Children's Hospital for over 21 years. Since 2003, Ms. Kawakami has been a nurse in Radiology at SHC. What she enjoys most about radiologic nursing is getting to meet many different patients, outpatients as well as inpatients: "Because many of these patients have chronic illnesses while others are acutely ill, I try to help make their experience better. I feel that if I ever needed a procedure, I would want staff that cared about what they were doing and really wanted to help." When she's not helping patients, Ms. Kawakami likes to read and sew, as well as enjoy desserts.

    Spencer Miller, RN, graduated from Florida Community College and has worked in ER nursing for 13 years, both as an avid travel nurse as well as on staff in hospitals in California, Florida, and Georgia. He has been a radiologic nurse at Stanford since February, and he enjoys radiologic nursing because he likes the technicality of procedures and the structured environment of the Radiology Department. Spencer's favorite part of being an RN is the feeling of accomplishment when someone's life is changed for the better, which he describes as "healing the sick, the second oldest profession!" The two biggest challenges he has faced in working as an RN have been the disappointing lack of a strong voice from nurses advocating for healthcare reform and the missing nurse-patient ratios in states other than California. Spencer feels that profit-driven healthcare leads to the inequitable treatment of patients. In addition to working at Stanford Radiology, he has published articles in Men in Nursing and Minority Nurse. Spencer lives in San Jose with his partner Tao, and two dogs: Teddy and BB.

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    Jo Miser, RN, BSN, (pictured on the left) is a native Californian who went to nursing school in New York to complete her degree. Although she had wanted to be a teacher, her aunt convinced her to become a nurse: "I think nursing has been a good thing for me. If you are very people oriented or a people person, you'll love it. I've met a lot of great people." After many years as a nurse in an operating room, ICU, and Emergency Department at Valley Medical Center, Ms. Miser needed a change. Recruited to SHC, she has worked at Stanford for over 20 years, mainly in outpatient surgery. Desiring a change, she transferred to Radiology in October of 2008, and she now works at Stanford Medicine Imaging Center (SMIC) in Palo Alto: "I've met a lot of great people here who have helped me make the transition to radiologic nursing. Some of the most challenging areas are starting IVs on patients who may not have the best venous access, but I enjoy trying to make patients feel comfortable and at ease. We have a lot of oncology patients coming back for scans, who are very apprehensive and worried. We hope for the best and try to convey that to the patient." The greatest changes Ms. Miser has seen over the course of her career are the shorter procedure and recovery times for patients: "Patients used to be admitted into the hospital for bowel surgery and prep, but now patients are doing this at home. In Radiology, we are doing a lot of procedures in CT scans such as kidney or liver biopsies, which are minimally invasive and require a shorter recovery time."

    Lisa Parker, RN, has wanted to be a nurse since she was eight- or nine-years old. After working for over fourteen years as a nurse, Ms. Parker decided it was time to transfer from her job as a nurse in the oral and maxillofacial surgery unit at the University of California, San Francisco: "That's the wonderful thing about nursing. You can change jobs and go from one spectrum to the other by switching your specialty." After one and a half years at SHC as a radiologic nurse, Ms. Parker finds helping her patients through difficult situations very satisfying: "They are scared and nervous, and they often don't know what to expect. One of the joys is helping them through the process and making them feel calmer about the experience."

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    Rachel S. Reyes, RN, BSN, CEN, will be celebrating 11 years at Stanford in June 2009. Her career in nursing began through a friend's suggestion that Ms. Reyes volunteer at Seton Medical Center in the ER. She did, and her volunteer work helped her decide to become a nurse. After graduating from City College of San Francisco with an Associate Degree in Nursing, she was recruited to work at Kaiser. A year later, she moved to Stanford Hospital and worked on D/E Ground. Arriving at Stanford's ER eight years ago, Ms. Reyes was trained by Mr. Madra. With Stanford's Transformational Scholarship and with the flexibility of ED Management, Ms. Reyes was able to earn her Bachelor of Science Degree in Nursing from San Francisco State University. Transferring to Radiology in January 2009, she is working with Mr. Madra once again: "I really enjoy participating in the collaborative care of our patients. I find it challenging and exciting to learn about caring for our patients in radiology, even though there is a learning curve because all the equipment and supplies are different than those in ER."


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    Selma Samayoa, RN, BSN, CCRN (critical care registered nurse) , completed her nursing degree at Cal State Hayward (which is now Cal State East Bay) after working as a music teacher for a number of years: "I enjoy science, biology, and physiology, so I chose nursing, thinking that I'd go back to music, but I don't teach anymore although I play the piano. I worked in the Stanford E2/ICU for over 21 years, but I hurt my back so I floated in SHC Radiology for one year to allow it to heal, and I never left." While she finds the rapid changes in radiologic technology challenging, Ms. Samayoa really enjoys working with her colleagues as a team and caring for her patients: "We do so many different types of scans that really improve patient care through noninvasive procedures. I love learning the latest techniques, and I find the new directions in radiologic nursing exciting." She still finds time for teaching, although not in the music field. Ms. Samayoa has been CCRN certified for over 28 years and holds a California Junior College Teaching Credential in Nursing. For five years, she has taught certification courses in critical care unit (CCU) nursing at Chabot College and Las Positas College. When she's not teaching or taking care of patients, Ms. Samayoa relishes playing tennis.

    Dottie Sharff, RN, earned her nursing degree from City College of San Francisco and began working at Seton Medical Center. She subsequently moved to the Hawaiian Islands, where she opened up the Islands' first coronary care unit. She later worked in coronary care in Washington and Michigan and eventually came to California in 1972. After 27 years in the ER at Stanford, Ms. Sharff decided it was time for a change and transferred to Radiology in 2000: "Radiologic nursing is very different from anything else that I have done. Although there's a learning curve, once you understand the technology, it's really exciting. Noninvasive medicine is the wave of the future, and we are at the cutting-edge of these procedures." When she's not at work, she enjoys reading, gardening, traveling, and spending time at her summer home in Clearlake, California, where she boats and relaxes in the sun.

    Laura Tracy, RN, was drawn to a medical career at an early age when she used to accompany her mother to Emory University, where her mother worked as a medical secretary. In high school, she joined a "Future Nurses Club" and decided to enlist in the army to complete her education. While serving as a medic at Ford Ord in Monterey, Ms. Tracy fell in love with the ocean and the California coastline. Although she had to return to Georgia to finish her education, she came back to California after completing her nursing degree and began working in the Stanford ER and trauma units in 1987. She has been working as a sexual assault nurse examiner for the County of Santa Clara for the past 13 years, and she started her own forensic business four years ago, after becoming a nationally certified forensic nurse examiner. She loves the mystery and detail of forensic medicine. For a little over one year, Ms. Tracy has worked in Radiology, which has always fascinated her. She particularly loves working at Stanford Medicine Imaging Center in Palo Alto: "I really love this particular Center because it caters to the patient by providing more opportunities to spend more time one-on-one with our patients. After working over 20 years in ER and trauma where we don't have as much time to spend with our patients, it's wonderful to be able to take the time to ask them how they are doing and feeling. It feels really good to be able to give them the extra special care they deserve, and the patients really appreciate it." Outside of work, Ms. Tracy doesn't have time for a lot of hobbies because she has two teenagers, but she does enjoy traveling. In the fall, she will be visiting the Galapagos Islands.


    Lyndy Yee, RN, completed her degree and training in the United Kingdom. She began her seven-year career at Stanford working in the Pediatric ICU at Lucile Packard Children's Hospital and then moved to the ER at Stanford Hospital and Clinics. Last week, she joined our Radiologic Nursing Team. Prior to coming to our Radiology Department, Ms. Yee had mainly worked with inpatients, so she is enjoying applying her skills, as well as learning new ones, in the outpatient setting. When she is not working, she enjoys hiking and camping with husband and her two sons (ages 7 and 13) as well as practicing yoga for her own rest and relaxation.

    Awards and Honors: July 7, 2009

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    Francis Blankenberg, MD, associate professor of radiology and associate professor (by courtesy) of pediatrics, has been awarded stimulus funds by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) for his project, "scVEGF Targeted Radiotherapy of Primary and Metastatic Mammary and Colonic Carcinoma."

    Dr. Blankenberg received his medical degree from the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). After finishing a general surgical intership and his residency at Stanford University Hospital, . . .

    he completed a pediatric fellowship at Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital. Dr. Blankenberg left Stanford to become a clinical instructor of computer tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in the Department of Radiology at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF). In July of 2001, he returned to Lucile Salter Packard Children's Hospital as an assistant professor of radiology. Dr. Blankenberg has over 95 publications and 3 U.S. and foreign patents.

    Dr. Blankenberg's research grant, "scVEGF Targeted Radiotherapy of Primary and Metastatic Mammary and Colonic Carcinoma," focuses on tumor vasculature, which has a unique set of markers including vascular endothelial cell growth factor (VEGF) receptors. Prior efforts to starve tumors by attacking these blood vessels with new, highly selective anti-VEGF drugs as single agents have been largely unsuccessful. Dr. Blankenberg and his colleagues propose to attach radiotherapeutic isotopes to a new form of VEGF known as scVEGF and to use this radiolabeled material to attack not only the tumor blood vessels/supply but also tumor cells. Successful completion of this proposal will be critical in laying the preclinical groundwork for a new class of tumor vessel radiotherapeutic agents that, by attacking a tumor on two fronts, will be more effective than current anti-VEGF drugs.

    The grant will support the hiring of Helen D'Arceuil, PhD, visiting assistant professor from Harvard and former researcher at the Lucas Center, who has expertise in small animal imaging with MRI of ischemic injury and brain development. Dr. D'Arceuil will now be assisting with the current award by employing her over twenty years experience in small animal modeling and imaging. The grant will also support the continued work of Zoia Levashova, PhD, who has over twenty years of experience in biochemical and animal model work at NIH. Dr. Levashova has spent the last four years with Dr. Blankenberg in the Nuclear Medicine Imaging Laboratory, and she has performed most of the pilot work for the current grant application and will play a major role in the successful execution of our proposal.

    To read more about the award, please access "First Round of NIH Stimulus Funds Includes 18 Projects at Stanford School of Medicine."

    Welcome to Our New Chief Residents!

    Congratulations to our three new chief residents who will begin their duties in July of 2009: Chivonne Harrigal, MD; Kendra Klang, MD; and Andy McBride, MD.


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    Andy McBride, MD, grew up in Milwaukee, Wisconsin and attended college at the University of Notre Dame. After graduating four years later, Andy attended medical school at the University of Pennsylvania, where he met his wife while she was completing her master's degree in psychology. During his fourth year of medical school, he worked for McKinsey & Company in management consulting. After he completed his internship in Philadelphia, Andy and his wife moved to California, where he began our Residency Program, and she began working as a Human Resource Business Partner at Google. They were married in April of 2009 and now live in Menlo Park. Andy's activities outside of work include golfing, traveling,running, and Notre Dame football.

    Awards and Honors: June 25, 2009

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    Jin Xie, PhD, postdoctoral fellow in the Molecular Imaging Probe Laboratory (MIPL), has been awarded a Travel Award from the Society of Nuclear Medicine (SNM). The purpose of the SNM Travel Awards is to provide support to nuclear medicine scientists for presenting innovative work at the SNM Annual Meeting. Dr. Xie will use his award to attend the 56th Society of Nuclear Medicine Annual Meeting from June 13 to June 17 in Toronto, Canada.

    In June 2008, Dr. Xie received his PhD from Brown University, where his research centered on magnetic nanoparticle synthesis, characterization, and surface modification as well as the magnetic nanoparticle interplay with biomolecules and their applications in molecular imaging and drug delivery. Moving to Stanford in July 2009, he joined Dr. Xiaoyuan Chen's group as a Stanford postdoctoral fellow in the Molecular Imaging Probe Laboratory (MIPL), where he has been working on the development of magnetic nanoparticle-based probes for MRI. Since then, Dr. Xie has extended his research interests to many other areas, such as NIRF, PET, stem cell, etc., and he is currently working on developing nanoparticle-based activatable probe development and on creating probes that are suitable for multi-modality purposes. When he is not in the lab, Dr. Xie enjoys electronic games. He is also a fan of soccer and karaoke.

    Awards and Honors: June 22, 2009

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    Sri-Rajasekhar (Raj) Kothapalli, PhD, postdoctoral fellow in the Multimodality Molecular Imaging Lab, has been appointed to a Hamalainen Pelican Postdoctoral Fellowship by the Sir Peter and Lady Michael Foundation. This postdoctoral fellowship supports innovative research, clinical trials, and applied methods for improving the detection, management, and non-invasive treatment of prostate cancer, with a particular focus on the development of multimodal (photoacoustic, optical, and ultrasound) molecular imaging techniques for obtaining rigorous and comprehensive information about early stage prostate cancer.

    Dr. Kothapalli received his bachelor of science degree in mathematics, physics, & chemistry from Nagarujuna University, India, followed by his master of science degree in nuclear physics from Andhra University, India, and his master of technology degree in applied optics from the Indian Institute of Technology, Delhi.

    Before receiving his master of science in applied physics from the University of Massachusetts, Boston, Dr. Kothapalli worked for an Indian defense organization developing optical pattern recognition techniques. While at the University of Massachusetts, he applied these pattern recognition techniques to medical imaging processing in areas such as mammography. His master's work piqued his interest in medical imaging, so he attained his PhD in biomedical engineering at Washington University in Saint Louis, Missouri, where he focused on developing a hybrid imaging modality that combines the advantages of both optics (high contrast) and ultrasound (excellent resolution and penetration depth). Working under the mentorship of Dr. Sanjiv Gambhir, Dr. Kothapalli plans to apply his background in physics and engineering to develop multimodal molecular imaging techniques for the early detection of cancer, with a particular emphasis on prostate cancer.

    In his spare time, he enjoys playing tennis in the summer; squash in the winter; and listening to inspirational music.

    Awards and Honors: June 15, 2009

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    Keren Ziv, PhD, postdoctoral fellow in the Multimodality Molecular Imaging Lab, has received a Life Sciences Research Foundation Fellowship (LSRF), which is bestowed upon young scientists who perform the highest quality of research.

    Prior to joining Dr. Gambhir's Multimodality Molecular Imaging Lab, Dr. Ziv was a postdoctoral scholar in Professor Michal Neeman's lab at the Weizmann Institute in Rehovot, Israel. She received both her PhD and master's degrees from the Department of Biological Regulation of the Feinberg Graduate School at the Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, Israel. Her PhD research focused on the functional and molecular imaging of gene expression.

    Dr. Ziv is the coauthor of seven publications as well as the recipient of many honors including the 2007 Auto Swartz Award and the 2008 AFLACAACR International Scholar-in-Training Award supported by Aflac, Inc.

    "Sanford/Atlas: Alternatives to Government Health Takeover"

    In their June 15th opinion piece published in The Washington Times, Governor Mark Sanford and Dr. Scott Atlas offer their views on healthcare reform: "government-run health systems by and large fail the very patients they were created to protect. In these systems, access to doctors, surgeries and new lifesaving treatments are severely limited. Innovation is discouraged, and medical technologies are deficient, forcing patients to undergo more invasive and dangerous care. Patient outcomes are worse, and costs keep escalating." To read the full article, please access http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2009/jun/15/raise-quality-further/ or Download file.

    Chief Resident Pat Basu Named Consultant of the Year

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    Dr. Basu has been awarded the Stanford/Kaiser Emergency Medicine Residency Program's highly prized "Consultant of the Year" Award, which is "dedicated to the consultant who, on a regular basis, acts in the best interest of Emergency Department patient care through clinical knowledge, action, teaching, and leadership." He is the first radiologist to win this award. A few of the many attributes for which Dr. Basu was commended include his outstanding radiologic communication, unusual ability to build consensus, as well as his extraordinary leadership and vision. His unique talents have earned him the universal respect of his peers who nominated him for this award, which he will receive at a special banquet on June 19th. "I highly value teamwork, leadership, and interpersonal skills and to be recognized for those skills is a great honor," Dr. Basu commented. "I am happy to be able to represent the Department and the profession with this accolade. Even though this is an individual recognition, I truly believe it is a team accomplishment."

    Awards and Honors: June 10, 2009

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    Gang Niu, PhD, postdoctoral scholar in the Molecular Imaging Probe Laboratory (MIPL), has been awarded a Society of Nuclear Medicine (SNM) Travel Award to attend the 56th Society of Nuclear Medicine Annual Meeting from June 13 to June 17 in Toronto, Canada. The purpose of the SNM Travel Awards is to provide support to nuclear medicine scientists for presenting innovative work at the SNM Annual Meeting. Dr. Niu received his PhD in free radical radiation biology from the University of Iowa, Iowa City, where his research focused on molecular imaging and tumor gene therapy, mediated by the human sodium iodide symporter (hNIS), to investigate the role of hNIS as a reporter gene monitoring gene transfer and expression. After arriving at Stanford in 2006, he began working in the MIPL under the supervision of Dr. Xiaoyuan Chen. Dr. Niu's current research interests include the investigation of tumor initiation and the progress and response to various therapies with non-invasive molecular imaging strategies, including optical and radiological modalities.

    Awards and Honors: June 9, 2009

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    Jeremy Pearl, Stanford medical student and member of the Cardiovascular Gene and Cell Therapy Group, has been awarded a second-year fellowship to the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI). Fellowship recipients are selected because they have shown "the greatest promise for future achievement in biomedical research" and "have demonstrated superior scholarship." Mentored by Joe Wu, MD, PhD, assistant professor of medicine (cardiology) and radiology, and Mark M. Davis, PhD, professor of microbiology and immunology, Mr. Pearl was initially awarded a first-year HHMI Fellowship in 2008. In 2009, he was one of a few select fellows who was given a second-year HHMI fellowship because of his outstanding biomedical research on the immunogenic properties of human embryonic stem cells.

    Before beginning medical school at Stanford, Mr. Pearl graduated summa cum laude from the University of California, San Diego, with a BS in human biology. In addition to the 2008-2009 and 2009-2010 Howard Hughes Medical Institute Medical Student Fellowships, he was acquired numerous honors, including the 2007 Orthopaedic Research and Education Foundation Research Fellowship. Mr. Pearl is also the first named inventor on the patent "Methods for the Control of Macrophage-Associated Inflammation" (S07-398 (STAN-593) 12/397, 925), and the co-author of over 15 abstracts, posters, and oral presentations as well as 5 publications, including "Seeing Is Believing: Tracking Cells to Determine the Effects of Cell Transplantation" (Pearl J, Wu JC) in Seminars in Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery (2008;20(2):102-109). When he is not working, Mr. Pearl enjoys playing and watching all sports, particularly basketball.

    Awards and Honors: June 3, 2009

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    Amelie Lutz, MD, PhD, clinical instructor of radiology and research scientist in the Multimodality Molecular Imaging Lab, has received the Marsha Rivkin Center for Ovarian Cancer Research Scholar Award for her project "Early Detection of Ovarian Cancer Using Targeted Microbubble-Enhanced Ultrasound." To promote career development, the Marsha Rivkin Center for Ovarian Cancer Research Scholar Award is bestowed upon young researchers in the field of ovarian cancer, whose projects have translational potential.

    Before becoming a CE and research scientist, Dr. Lutz was a postdoctoral fellow in the Multimodality Molecular Imaging Laboratory at Stanford. She received her medical degree from the University of Freiburg, Germany, and completed her internship in internal medicine in the Department of Gastroenterology and Endocrinology at the University Hospital in Freiburg, Germany. Dr. Lutz did her training in diagnostic radiology at the University Hospital in Zurich and at the Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, Kantonal Hospital, in Frauenfeld, Switzerland.

    In addition to the Marsha Rivkin Center for Ovarian Cancer Research Scholar Award, Dr. Lutz has received numerous honors, including the 2008 Bronze Award from the European Society of Gastrointestinal Radiology (co-author) and the 2004 Swiss Society of Radiology Research Award for her paper "Ultra Small Superparamagnetic Oxide (USPIO) Enhanced MR Imaging for Detection of Macrophage Activity in an Experimental Model of Antigen-Induced Arthritis," which is one of her 27 peer-reviewed publications. Her clinical and research interests include: musculoskeletal radiology and interventions; body imaging with computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging; molecular imaging in oncology; cellular imaging of musculoskeletal inflammatory diseases; and kinematic musculoskeletal imaging. When she is not working, Dr. Lutz enjoys life as a new mom with her family.

    For her prior blog award posting, please access http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2007/02/awards_and_hono_18.html.

    Awards and Honors: June 2, 2009

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    Juergen K. Willmann, MD, assistant professor of radiology (abdominal imaging) and head of the Translational Molecular Imaging Laboratory, has received the highly prestigious Walter Friedrich Award at the 90th Annual Meeting of the German Society of Radiology in Berlin. The award was named in honor of Dr. Walter Friedrich, a 1914 Nobel Laureate. Awarded only once each year, the Walter Friedrich Award was bestowed upon Dr. Juergen K. Willmann for his outstanding research in the field of radiology.

    Prior to becoming an assistant professor at Stanford, Dr. Willmann was a research fellow in the Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford (MIPS) while concurrently an assistant professor of diagnostic radiology at the Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital Zurich, Switzerland. He received his MD from the Albert-Ludwigs-University Freiburg, Germany, and was the chief resident of diagnostic radiology at the University Hospital Zurich, Switzerland. Under his leadership, the Translational Molecular Imaging Lab focuses on multimodality molecular imaging of angiogenesis and stem cell therapy as well as the development of multi-modality imaging approaches for the early detection of cancer. When he is not working, Dr. Willmann enjoys his life as a new Dad and plays the piano. To read Dr. Willmann's prior award postings, please access http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2009/04/awards_and_hono_79.html; http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2009/01/awards_and_hono_73.html; http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2008/11/awards_and_hono_61.html; http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2008/05/awards_and_hono_38.html; http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2007/12/awards_and_hono_21.html; and
    http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2007/02/awards_and_hono_18.html.

    Did You Know?

    CT Scans and War

    For the first time in war, CT scans are being used in autopsies according to Denise Grady of the New York Times: "Since 2004, every service man and woman killed in Iraq or Afghanistan has been given a CT scan, and since 2001, when the fighting began in Afghanistan, all have had autopsies, performed by pathologists in the Armed Forces Medical Examiner System. In previous wars, autopsies on people killed in combat were uncommon, and scans were never done." To read the full article from May 25, 2009, please access "Autopsies of War Dead Reveal Ways to Save Others" or Download file.

    Announcements: May 28, 2009

    Third Annual Cardinal Walk: Friday, May 29, 2009, from 11:30 AM to 1 PM at Roble Field on Santa Teresa Street.

    Event Schedule
    11:30--Free t-shirts for first 1,500 walkers and free music and refreshments (No registration required!).

    11:35--Spirit Contestants must check-in.

    11:45--Spirit Contest judging on creativity and enthusiasm (trophies awarded)

    12:05--Provost Welcome

    12:10 to 1 PM--Campus Walk

    For more information, please access http://stanford.wellsphere.com/3rd-annual-cardinal-walk-community/249295.

    Awards and Honors: May 26, 2009

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    Andrei Iagaru, MD, instructor of nuclear medicine, received the Alavi-Mandell Award from the Society of Nuclear Medicine for his paper "90Y-Ibritumomab Therapy in Refractory Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma: Observations from 111In-Ibritumomab Pretreatment Imaging." Dr. Iagaru's article is featured on the cover of and published in the Journal of Nuclear Medicine (2008 Nov;49(11):1809-12. Epub 2008 Oct 16). The Alavi-Mandell Award "honors the work of a young investigator who is pursuing a career in nuclear medicine" and will be presented to Dr. Iagaru at the 2009 SNM Annual Meeting in Toronto.

    Dr. Iagaru completed medical school at the Carol Davila University of Medicine, Bucharest, Romania, and an internship at Drexel University College of Medicine, Graduate Hospital, in the Department of Medicine. He began his residency at the University of Southern California (USC) Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles, in the Division of Nuclear Medicine, where he was the chief resident. He finished his residency and completed a PET/CT fellowship at Stanford University's School of Medicine in the Division of Nuclear Medicine. He is currently an Instructor in the Department of Radiology and his current research interests include whole-Body MRI and PET/CT for early cancer detection; Zevalin/Bexxar radioimmunotherapy; optical imaging of breast cancer; clinical translation of novel PET radiopharmaceuticals; and PET-CT imaging for thyroid/breast cancers, melanoma, lymphoma, and sarcoma.

    For his prior blog posting, please access http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2008/07/awards_and_hono_47.html.

    Awards and Honors: May 21, 2009

    Roland1_100.jpgRoland Bammer, PhD, along with his collaborators Drs. Fischbein, and Moseley, has received R01 grant funding from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) for his project, "Novel Acquisition Methods for Diffusion MRI." This is one of the first ARRA awards in the School of Medicine. The goal of Dr. Bammer's research project is to improve pediatric imaging by developing diffusion-weighted 3D spiral projection imaging for high-resolution 3D SSFP and SE DTI at 3T, reducing distortions related to motion and susceptibility differences. This past winter 2009, Dr. Bammer, along with his collaborators Drs. Atlas, Barnes, and Moseley, also received R01 funding for his project "Short Axis EPI for Diffusion Tensor MRI at High Field," which focuses on developing new types of EPI sequences for high resolution, low SAR, diffusion tensor imaging at 3T and 7T using parallel receive and parallel transmit technology. The success of his research projects will significantly improve MR exams in both children and adult patients by reducing the overall scan time; improving the diagnostic capacity of the images; and providing an alternative contrast mechanism and the means to understand more clearly the underlying tissue microstructure, particularly in terms of how it is composed and how the brain is anatomically/functionally connected with different regions.

    For his prior blog posting, please access http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2007/09/awards_and_hono_2.html.

    Awards and Honors: May 20, 2009

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    Natesh Parashurama, MD, PhD, postdoctoral fellow in the Multimodality Molecular Imaging Lab, received a Young Investigator Award at the International Society for Cellular Therapy 2009 Annual Meeting for his presentation "Stably Expressed Multimodality Fusion Reporter Genes For Tracking Mesenchymal Stem Cell Status in Hearts of Living Subjects." These merit-based Awards are offered to select Young Investigators submitting abstracts.

    Dr. Parashurama received his BS in chemical engineering from MIT and his medical degree from the State University of New York at Buffalo. Subsequently, he completed his PhD in chemical bioengineering at Rutgers University. While earning his PhD, he completed a three and a half-year graduate fellowship at Harvard Medical School.

    Dr. Parashurama's research interests include using multimodality imaging of stem cell functions for both enhanced understanding of the biology of stem cells and for translating these techniques to the clinic. These functions include cell homing and differentiation; the application of quantitative molecular imaging tools to study cell proliferation and differentiation; cell function; the cellular micro-environment; cell trafficking; the immune response; and cell-mediated gene therapy. For his prior blog posting, please access http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2009/01/awards_and_hono_74.html and http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2008/02/awards_and_hono_28.html.


    Announcements: May 20, 2009

    Stanford Blood Center's Grateful Life Tour, May 22nd, 23rd, 26th, 27th, 28th, 29th, and 30th; June 26th, 27th, 29th, and 30th; and July 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, and 6th at all Stanford Blood Center locations: For the fifth consecutive year, the Stanford Blood Center is sponsoring the "Grateful Life Tour" blood drive ("Grateful Life Tour V") in which blood donors will get to choose either the traditional tie dye t-shirt with the "Giving is Groovy Grateful Life Tour V" design or a brand new design featuring "recylce life. give blood" on a 100% organic cotton t-shirt. The Grateful Life Tour will take place on May 22nd, 23rd, 26th, 27th, 28th, 29th, and 30th; June 26th, 27th, 29th, and 30th; and July 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th, and 6th. For more information please access http://bloodcenter.stanford.edu/news/special_events.html#GLT. For maps and directions for all Stanford Blood Centers, please access http://bloodcenter.stanford.edu/bcinfo/maps.html.


    Awards and Honors: May 18, 2009

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    Kim Butts Pauly, PhD, associate professor of radiology and of bioengineering (by courtesy), was recently recognized as Fellow of the International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine (ISMRM) at the 20009 annual meeting in Honolulu, Hawaii. Dr. Butts Pauly was made a Fellow of the ISMRM for her "significant and substantial contributions to research" in her field.

    Dr. Butts Pauly received her PhD in biophysical sciences from Mayo Graduate School. She was a postdoctoral research fellow in our Department, becoming an assistant professor of radiology in 1996. Dr. Butts Pauly's current research interests are focused on image-guided minimally invasive therapies, including MR-guided high intensity focused ultrasound and MR-guided cryoablation. She has published her work in over 75 peer-reviewed publications. When Dr. Butts Pauly is not working, she enjoys gardening, traveling with her family, and reading with her kids.

    Did You Know?

    Glimpse of Radiologists in 1938
    (from "The Economics of the Practice of Radiology" in JAMA, V. 113, N. 10; 1939:943-948)

    --The total number of radiologists in the United States had grown by 118%, increasing from 1,005 in 1931 to 2,191 in 1938.

    (According to a survey of 876 radiologists in "The Economics of the Practice of Radiology":)

    --The average age of the surveyed radiologists was 49 years old and the mean number of years of specialization was 18.

    --In 102 hospitals, "roentgenologic interpretations" were made by someone other than the radiologist while in 1,148 hospitals, the "roentgenologic interpretations" were made "only by specialists in radiology."

    --25% of the radiologists who also practiced in some other field were likely to have chosen (in order of frequency) general practice, surgery, internal medicine, or pathology.

    --There were proportionately more radiologists in the Mid-Atlantic (704) and Pacific (192) sections than in the North West Central (172) and East South Central (86) states.

    --Most radiologists (640 or 73%) worked part-time in one or more hospitals, and most fees for the services of radiologists were included in the hospital bills sent to patients.

    Dr. Vasanawala and Colleagues Receive the Prestigious Caffey Award

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    Dr. Shreyas Vasanawala, assistant professor of pediatric radiology at the Stanford University School of Medicine and co-director of pediatric MRI at Lucile Packard Children's Hospital, was awarded the Caffey Award for Outstanding Basic Science Research Paper at the annual meeting of the Society for Pediatric Radiology in Carlsbad, California, on April 24, 2009. The award was in recognition of his scientific paper "Faster Pediatric MRI Via Compressed Sensing."
    His collaborators included . . .

    Marcus Alley, PhD; Richard A. Barth, MD; Brian Hargreaves, PhD; John Pauly, PhD; and Michael Lustig, PhD. Please find short biographies of some of his collaborators below.

    The Caffey Research Award is presented annually for the best original research to advance the care of children via imaging. The highly regarded Caffey Award recognizes Dr. Vasanawala's work for exploring a novel MRI method that is faster and permits higher resolution imaging with less motion-related blurring. This is highly relevant to the pediatric population as it holds tremendous promise for performing MRI either without or with substantially reduced sedation or anesthesia.

    Dr. Vasanawala joined the Department of Radiology faculty in July of 2007, after receiving his degree and a PhD in biophysics from Stanford University, followed by residency training in radiology at Stanford University Medical Center and a pediatric radiology fellowship at Lucile Packard Children's Hospital (LPCH). During his fellowship, Dr. Vasanawala received specialty training in pediatric musculoskeletal imaging at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center and in pediatric cardiovascular imaging at Sick Kids in Toronto. At Stanford, Dr. Vasanawala's research aims to improve magnetic resonance imaging techniques for evaluating pediatric disease.

    The Caffey Awards, established in 1969 as the "John Caffey Award Paper," are named in honor of John P. Caffey, MD, who is widely recognized as the father of pediatric radiology. He defined pediatric radiology as a specialty by writing the seminal text book, Pediatric X-Ray Diagnosis. First published in 1945, the book has remained in print continuously since then. The 11th edition was recently published (2008) as Caffey's Pediatric Diagnostic Imaging, 30 years after Dr. Caffey's death. John Caffey's enormous contributions to radiology and pediatrics improved the well being of children and are gratefully acknowledged through the recognition of excellent scientific and clinical work in the specialty he engendered.

    (Text above is from the Packard Media Group, for release on April 27, 2009.)


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    Marcus Alley, PhD, senior research scientist, received his BA in physics from Reed College in Portland, Oregon, and his MS (physics) and PhD (nuclear physics) from the University of Wisconsin, Madison, where he completed his thesis entitled "An Effective Range Determination of Phase Shifts for the Elastic Proton Helium-3 Reaction between the Energies of 0 and 12 MeV." Dr. Alley has been a member of the Stanford Department of Radiology since 1994, when he began as a postdoctoral fellow mentored by Norbert Pelc, ScD. After completing his postdoctoral fellowship, Dr. Alley worked as an MR applications and software developer, and, in May of 2005, he became a senior research scientist in our Department. His current research involves developing MRI with compressed sensing for body and pediatric imaging. His past awards include a third place Scientific Paper Award for his paper entitled "Measurement of T1 of Flowing Blood, Extraction Fraction of Gd-DTPA and Single-Kidney GFR Using Interleaved Spiral Acquisition" from the Society of Uroradiology, Twenty-Fifth Scientific Assembly, in 2000. Dr. Alley also has over 35 publications and 7 patents.

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    Brian Hargreaves, PhD, assistant professor of radiology, completed his doctoral degree in electrical engineering at Stanford University. In 2005, he joined the Stanford Radiology Department faculty. Dr. Hargreaves' research focuses on body magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) applications (including abdominal, vascular, breast, and musculoskeletal imaging) and the development of novel excitation schemes, efficient imaging methods, and reconstruction tools that provide improved diagnostic contrast compared with current methods. Aside from work, he plays ice hockey and soccer, and he is on the volunteer ski patrol at Sugar Bowl ski resort. To view Dr. Hargreaves' pior blog postings, please access http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2009/02/drs_gold_and_ha_2.html; http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2009/01/drs_gold_and_ha.html; and http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2008/04/awards_and_hono_31.html.

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    Michael Lustig, PhD, engineering research associate, received his BSc in 2001 from the Department of Electrical Engineering, in Technion-IIT, Haifa, Israel. He completed his PhD in 2008 from the Department of Electrical Engineering at Stanford University, where his doctoral research focused on the application of compressed sensing to rapid MRI. Currently, he is a research associate in the Magnetic Resonance Systems Research Lab (MRSRL) in the Stanford Department of Engineering, where his research interests include medical imaging reconstruction, MR pulse sequence design, convex optimization, and inverse problems.

    Awards and Honors: May 6, 2009

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    Zheng Miao, PhD, postdoctoral scholar in the Cancer Molecular Imaging Chemistry Laboratory, has been granted the First Prize in Basic Science Award for his abstract entitled "A Protein Scaffold Based Molecule for EGFR PET Imaging" from the Society of Nuclear Medicine (SNM). He will receive his award at the SNM Annual Meeting, which will be held in Toronto, Canada, on June 14-17, 2009.

    As a postdoctoral scholar at Stanford, his research focuses on the application of scaffold protein in molecular imaging. Dr. Miao's other areas of specialization include protein engineering; the synthesis of synthesis of bifunctional metal chelates and of peptides and analogs, with solid phase resin; and the conjugation of proteins and peptides to solid surface resin as well as the cross-linking of proteins. Most recently, he published a research article in Bioconjugate Chemistry: "Cysteinylated Protein as Reactive Disulfide: An Alternative Route to Affinity-Labeling" (2008;19;15-19).

    Dr. Miao received his PhD in biophysical chemistry from the University of California, Davis, where he completed his dissertation entitled "Synthesis and Medical Application of Bifunctional Metal Chelates." When he's not working, Dr. Miao enjoys hiking, rafting, and sports. One of his other favorite activities, he commented, is "spending time with my lovely family."


    National Nurses Week, May 6-12, 2009, "Nurses: Building a Healthy America"

    Sponsored by the American Nurses Association, National Nurses Week 2009, "Nurses: Building a Healthy America," is celebrated each year from May 6th to May 12th. The American Nurses Association characterizes the importance of this week as follows: "Often described as an art and a science, nursing is a profession that embraces dedicated people with varied interests, strengths and passions because of the many opportunities the profession offers. As nurses, we work in emergency rooms, school based clinics, and homeless shelters, to name a few. We have many roles--from staff nurse to educator to nurse practitioner and nurse researcher--and serve all of them with passion for the profession and with a strong commitment to patient safety."

    The week of May 6th to 12th was chosen because of its special significance to nursing. May 12th is the birthday of Florence Nightingale, the founder of modern nursing; May 6th is also known as National Nurses Day; May 8th was designated in 1998 as National Student Nurses Day, which is also celebrated annually; and in 2003, the Wednesday within National Nurses Week (May 6th-12th) was designated as National School Nurse Day. For more information on the history and significance of National Nurses Week, please access http://www.nursingworld.org/FunctionalMenuCategories/MediaResources/
    NationalNursesWeek/NNWHistory.aspx
    .

    Our radiologic nurses at Stanford Hospital and Clinics are dedicated professionals, building a healthy America one patient at a time. During National Nurses Week 2009, our nurses will be honored by a special lunch and dessert. In recognition of National Nurses Week, some of our nurses have created posters that are on display in the SHC atrium. Please stop by to view them.


    Announcements: May 5, 2009

    Organizational Meeting (5/6) for Kids Day at Clark: Wednesday, May 6, 2009, from 12:30 PM to 1:30 PM in Clark, S360. Bring your planning ideas to the meeting as we organize the Friday, June 12th, "Kids Day at Clark." Join us to discuss how to make an impact for the next generation of scientists and engineers! If you want to get involved, but you can't make it to the meeting, please write to: Jill Sakata.

    Announcements: May 1, 2009

    Avon Walk for Breast Cancer: Saturday and Sunday, July 11-12, 2009, from the Golden Gate Bridge to the Sausalito waterfront and back again. Registrants will walk up to 26.2 miles on Saturday and 13.1 miles on Sunday. For information on how to register, please access http://walk.avonfoundation.org/site/PageServer?pagename=sanf_home_2k8.

    Stanford Routs UCSF in Flag Football

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    (Images courtesy of Pat Basu, MD)

    With veteran leaders Sandip "notorious Biz" Biswal and Gary "the Grid-Iron" Glazer on the injured reserve, there were questions about whether #1 ranked Stanford could beat revenge-minded and #2 ranked UCSF on their home field (for the full story, please see the July 19, 2008, "Stanford-UCSF Softball Challenge" at http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2008/07/stanforducsf_so_1.html). However, Stanford just had too much firepower as the Cardinal left no doubt in their 42-12 rout in front of a sell-out crowd. The Cardinal Radiologists racked up over 600 yards of offense and . . .

    45:13 in time of possession to go with their 7 touchdowns.

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    A sign of things to come, captain and quarterback Pat "Peanut Butta" Basu took the opening kick-off deep inside UCSF territory. Subsequently, Andy "gimme the dang ball" Mcbride caught a touchdown in the corner of the endzone setting up Cam Tran's 1-point conversion catch to take an early 7-0 lead, and the Cardinal never looked back. Deep threats Mcbride, Ray Hsu, and Cam Tran were complemented by sure-handed receivers Chris Bealieu and Ivan Petrovich. With the hurry-up offense in action, an audible at-the-line-isolated Petrovich on UCSF's dual sport star Ron Aronson for a 13-0 lead, and Beaulieu's "Jack Clark"-like catch for the PAT made it 14-0. Beaulieu, who was picked up as a free agent from the 49ers, said "Hey, I just want the niners to see what they lost by not protecting me as their franchise player. In football, there are BMWs and there are yugos, I see us as a BMW."

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    Basu completed passes to 8 different receivers and finished the game 25-36, passing for 492 yards completing 4 touchdowns passing, 2 touchdowns running, and with no interceptions or sacks. After the game, Basu added, "they have a great team, we just wanted to come out and compete. I just want to credit my offensive line and our defense for setting the tone out there today. Those guys deserve the game ball. There is no 'I' in team . . . ." Unfortunately, our recorder ran out of memory for his 8-minute quote.

    An Andy Mcbride 30-yard reception and a Craig "still has wheels" McCormick's 20-yard end around set up another score early in the second half that put the game out of reach. Justus Roos caught the conversion in the flat and dove rugby style into the back of the endzone punctuating the dominating performance. Mcbride, fueled by a pre-game debate over who the better Mcbride is, him or his fiance, Andrea, solidified his #1 household ranking with 11 catches for 197 yards and 2 TDs.

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    An opportunisitic and stingy Stanford defense held the overmatched UCSF squad scoreless until less than 10 minutes left in the game. The Scottish connection of Mcbride and McCormick had two key interceptions in the first half while the game was still close. The aggressive defensive line showed flashes of brilliance from the future of the Cardinal squad--rookies Jared Narvid, Mike Kim, and the Twindian Terrors Srihari and Srinath Sampath who harassed and confused the UCSF quarterback into several interceptions. Sampath said after the game, "We'll play them anytime, anywhere--we'll even play them in the lab. I don't care whose field this is; as far as I'm concerned it's always OUR house."

    Seena "Big D" Dehkargani, Ray "Lewis" Hsu, and Cam "the train" Tran racked up tackles for the staunch Stanford defense. In the end, the UCSF players were gracious and their captain vowed to recruit some better athletes in this week's upcoming NFL Match Day. In any case, they will try to avoid the season sweep when the two teams collide in sand volleyball later this year. Until then, the Stanford Radiology Department retains its undefeated record against their rivals from the North with thrashings in both softball and flag football.

    Awards and Honors: April 22, 2009

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    Dr. Shreyas Vasanawala, assistant professor of radiology, has received the Morgridge Scholar Grant, which is awarded to scientists whose research promises to "create a novel design, solve a specific problem, challenge an existing paradigm or clinical practice, address a critical barrier to progress in the field, or develop new technology." Dr. Vasanawala joined the Department of Radiology faculty in July of 2007, after receiving his degree and a PhD in biophysics from Stanford University, followed by residency training in radiology at Stanford University Medical Center and a pediatric radiology fellowship at Lucile Packard Children's Hospital (LPCH). During his fellowship, Dr. Vasanawala received specialty training in pediatric musculoskeletal imaging at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center and in pediatric cardiovascular imaging at Sick Kids in Toronto. At Stanford, Dr. Vasanawala's research focus includes testing the feasibility of magnetic resonance imaging techniques for evaluating pediatric and abdominal disease. His proposal focuses on reducing sedation or anesthesia for pediatric MRI. For his prior blog postings, please access
    http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2009/03/awards_and_hono_78.html;
    http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2009/02/awards_and_hono_76.html;
    http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2008/07/awards_and_hono_43.html;
    and
    http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2007/07/new_faculty_hir.html.

    Awards and Honors I: April 20, 2009

    Cheng_Zhen_72.jpgZhen Cheng, PhD, head of the Cancer Molecular Imaging Chemistry Laboratory (CMICL), has been awarded a Young Investigator Award by the Melanoma Research Alliance, which supports "outstanding young investigators whose work shows great promise in the field of melanoma research." Dr. Cheng received his Bachelor of Science degree in chemistry from Sichuan University. He also holds an MS from the National Research Center of Isotope Engineering and Technology & China Institute of Atomic Energy and a PhD from the Department of Chemistry at the University of Missouri-Columbia. From 2001 to 2003, he was a postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Radiology at Harvard Medical School. His awards include a California Breast Cancer Research Program-IDEA Award in 2008; a Young Investigator Travel Scholarship to attend the 2005 Academy of Molecular Imaging Annual Conference; and a 1997-1998 graduate fellowship at the University of Missouri-Columbia. As head of the Cancer Molecular Imaging Chemistry Laboratory (CMICL) of MIPS, he is developing novel molecular imaging probes and non-invasive techniques for the early detection of cancer and its metastasis. He is also researching the molecular, metabolic, and physiological characteristics of cancers and their responses to therapy by identifying novel cancer biomarkers with significant clinical relevance; by devising new chemistry for the preparation of probes; and by validating new strategies for probes by using high-throughput screening. For his prior blog posting, please access
    http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2008/01/new_faculty_hir_3.html.

    (Image courtesy of Mark Riesenberger)

    Awards and Honors II: April 20, 2009

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    Kazim Narsinh, research fellow in the Multimodality Molecular Imaging Laboratory (MMIL), was awarded the 2009 Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) Research Fellowship. Bestowed upon outstanding medical students, the HHMI Fellowship helps further promising careers in translational research. Mr. Narsinh's research interests include the molecular imaging of human embryonic stem cells, and he has recently coauthored two in press articles: "Application of Reporter Gene Imaging for Studying Human Embryonic Stem Cells in Living Subjects" (Methods in Molecular Biology 2009 vol. 515) and "Comparisons of Gene Transfer Efficiency in Human Embryonic Stem Cells" (Molecular Imaging and Biology 2009). In addition to working as a research fellow in the MMIL, Mr. Narsinh is currently a medical student at the University of San Diego, (UCSD), School of Medicine, where he is the manager of the Cardiology Clinic as well as a member of the UCSD Student-Run Free Clinic and the Global Health Interest Group. Prior to attending medical school, he graduated from the University of California, Berkeley, with a Bachelor of Arts in biochemistry. When not working, Mr. Narsinh enjoys playing tennis and tabla, a hand drum.

    Announcements: April 17, 2009

    CCNE Nano-Bio Seminar Series Presents Donald E. Ingber, MD, PhD, "From Biological Design Principles to Bioinspired Nanotechnologies": Tuesday, April 21st; Seminar & Discussion from 4:30-5:30 PM; Reception from 5:30-6:00 PM; in the Clark Auditorium, S001, Clark Building at Stanford University.

    Donald E. Ingber, MD, PhD
    Director, Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering
    Judah Folkman Professor of Vascular Biology, Harvard Medical School and Children's Hospital
    Professor of Bioengineering, Harvard School of Engineering & Applied Sciences

    Abstract:
    The burgeoning field of Nanotechnology offers exciting new approaches to attack fundamental questions in biology, create smart medical devices, and positively impact human health. Creation of biologically-inspired nanotechnologies also could revolutionize how materials are designed and manufactured for industrial, aerospace, and military applications. But the fields are constrained by a lack of understanding of how living cells and tissues are constructed so that they exhibit their incredible organic properties, including their ability to change shape, move, grow, and self-heal. These are properties we strive to mimic, but we cannot yet build manmade materials that exhibit these features, or develop devices to selectively control these behaviors. To accomplish this, we must . . .

    uncover the underlying design principles that govern how cells and tissues form and function as hierarchical assemblies of nanometer scale components. In this lecture, I will review work from my laboratory and others, which has begun to reveal these design principles that permit self-assembly of 3D structures with great robustness, mechanical strength, and biochemical efficiency, even though they are composed of many thousands of flexible molecular scale components. We also are beginning to understand that biological materials are simultaneously "structure and catalyst": the molecular lattices that form the frameworks of our cells and tissues combine mechanical functions and solid-phase biochemical processing activities. In the course of the lecture, I also will describe how recently developed nanotechnologies have been used to create model systems for biological studies, and how they have led to new approaches to interface living cells with microchips, control mammalian cell and tissue development, and probe the process of mechanotransduction--how cells sense mechanical forces and convert them into biochemical responses. Finally, the more fundamental question of how nanoscale structural networks impact information processing (signal transduction) networks to control cellular "decision-making" also will be explored. Understanding of these design principles that govern biological organization is critical for any nanotechnologist who wants to harness the power of biology.

    Sponsored by: Center for Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence Focused on Therapy Response(CCNE-TR) Program--NIH/NCI U54

    Hosted by: Sanjiv Sam Gambhir, MD, PhD, and the Departments of Radiology and Bioengineering

    Awards and Honors: April 17, 2009

    Wu_100100.jpgJoseph Wu, MD, PhD, assistant professor of medicine (cardiology) and radiology, has received the 2009 Douglas P. Zipes Distinguished Young Scientist Award. According to the American College of Cardiology (ACCR), the award is given "[t]o recognize a young scientist who has made outstanding contributions to the field of cardiovascular medicine and who has amassed an impressive body of scientific research in either the clinical or basic domain." For Dr. Wu's prior awards, please see http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2008/11/awards_and_hono_63.html; http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2008/10/_joseph_wu_md_p.html ; http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2008/06/awards_and_hono_42.html ; and http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2007/04/awards_and_hono_1.html.

    Announcements: April 14, 2009

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    10th Annual Student-Organized "An Art Affair," Stanford's Largest Arts Festival: Thursday, Friday, and Saturday (April 16th-18th) in White Plaza (free and open to the public). The art festival offers three days of artwork, performances, and interactive art with over 90 Stanford student visual artists and photographers displaying their work; an artist reception; DJ and dessert party; and film screening. Twelve ASSU Arts Grant recipients will also be displaying their work from their winter quarter projects, and there will be over 50 performances from Stanford arts groups, including music, dance, and theater. Contact Bria at bria@stanford.edu for more information or access http://soca.stanford.edu for a complete schedule.

    Awards and Honors: April 1, 2009

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    Juergen K. Willmann, MD, assistant professor of radiology (abdominal imaging) and member of the Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford (MIPS), has been named as a 2009-10 pilot awardee by the Stanford Digestive Disease Center, an NIH-funded (P30) research center program led by Dr. Harry Greenberg. After a very competitive selection process, Dr. Willmann was selected as one of five pilot awardees, based on his project, "Non-Invasive Molecular Ultrasound Imaging for Diagnosing and Monitoring Inflammatory Bowel Disease Using Molecularly Targeted Microbubbles."

    Prior to becoming an assistant professor at Stanford, Dr. Willmann was a research fellow in the Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford (MIPS) while concurrently an assistant professor of diagnostic radiology at the Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital Zurich, Switzerland. He received his MD from the Albert-Ludwigs-University Freiburg, Germany, and was the chief resident of diagnostic radiology at the University Hospital Zurich, Switzerland. Under his leadership, the Translational Molecular Imaging Lab focuses on multimodality molecular imaging of angiogenesis and stem cell therapy as well as the development of multi-modality imaging approaches for the early detection of cancer. When he is not working, Dr. Willmann enjoys his life as a new Dad and plays the piano. To read Dr. Willmann's prior award postings, please access http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2009/01/awards_and_hono_73.html; http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2008/11/awards_and_hono_61.html; http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2008/05/awards_and_hono_38.html; http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2007/12/awards_and_hono_21.html; and
    http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2007/02/awards_and_hono_18.html.


    Awards and Honors: March 31, 2009

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    Christoph Lee, MD, third-year radiology resident, has been awarded the American Medical Association (AMA) Foundation's 2009 Leadership Award, which is designed "to encourage involvement in organized medicine and continue leadership development among the country's brightest and most energetic medical students, residents, early career physicians and established physicians." On March 9th, Dr. Lee was honored for his strong non-clinical leadership skills in medicine and the community at the AMA's annual Excellence in Medicine Awards Ceremony in Washington, D.C., along with 30 other award recipients.

    Dr. Lee graduated cum laude from both Princeton University, where he received his bachelor's degree, and Yale University Medical School. Through his authorship of multiple research articles and commentaries in peer-reviewed journals, he has advocated at the national level for public health and education regarding CT radiation risks. He has also served as a project manager of a global tuberculosis initiative for Ralph Nader in Washington, D.C., and as an analyst for a prominent national healthcare policy research and consulting firm. At the community level, Dr. Lee helped implement the Healthcare for the Homeless Program in St. Louis, MO, and assisted in leading a free clinic for migrant farm workers in Connecticut. After completing his residency, Dr. Lee plans to pursue a career in health services and policy research with a focus on the clinically effective and cost-effective utilization of medical imaging. When he's not working, Dr. Lee enjoys running, playing tennis, and keeping up with pop culture.

    Awards and Honors: March 25, 2009

    Neal Bangerter, PhD, research associate; Garry E. Gold, MD, associate professor of radiology and (by courtesy) bioengineering and orthopedics; Brian Hargreaves, PhD, assistant professor of radiology; Seungbum Koo, PhD, assistant professor of mechanical engineering at Chung-Ang University in South Korea; Ernesto Staroswiecki, PhD; and Ronald Watkins, senior research engineer, received the Cum Laude Award at the 2009 Meeting of the Society of Computed Body Tomography and Magnetic Resonance (SCBT/MR) for their exceptional research project, "Early Detection of Osteoarthritis in Patients with ACL Injury Using Sodium MRI." Please access photos and brief biographies of some of our award winners by clicking on the link below.

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    Garry E. Gold, MD, associate professor of radiology and (by courtesy) bioengineering and orthopedics, received a master's degree in electrical engineering from Stanford in 1988 and his MD from Stanford in 1992. Dr. Gold has authored over 60 journal articles, 170 abstracts, and 5 patents in MRI. He has been the principal investigator or a co-investigator on over 30 funded research projects, and he is the principal investigator on two NIH-funded projects to improve MR imaging of osteoarthritis and the use of real-time MRI for the study of biomechanics. The International Skeletal Society recently awarded Dr. Gold the President's Medal, and this is the sixth time he was been awarded the Lauterbur Award for the best MRI paper from the Society for Computed Body Tomography and Magnetic Resonance (SCBT/MR). Dr. Gold reviews manuscripts for ten peer-reviewed journals, including the Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (JMRI) and the Journal of Magnetic Resonance in Medicine (MRM), and he is on the editorial board of several publications. At Stanford, Dr. Gold practices clinical musculoskeletal radiology, teaching medical students, residents, and fellows. He teaches two courses in imaging physics and human anatomy for medical students and graduate students, and he was recently awarded the Kaiser Award for outstanding and innovative contributions to education. He also serves as an advisor and co-advisor for many engineering graduate students and postdoctoral fellows. To view his prior blog postings, please access http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2009/02/drs_gold_and_ha_2.html; http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2009/01/drs_gold_and_ha.html; http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2008/06/people_and_thei_6.html; http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2008/04/awards_and_hono_37.html; http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2008/04/awards_and_hono_31.html; http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2007/10/awards_and_hono_19.html; http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2007/04/awards_and_hono_1.html; http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2007/02/awards_and_hono_18.html; and http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2007/02/new_faculty_hir_1.html.


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    Brian Hargreaves, PhD, assistant professor of radiology, completed his doctoral degree in electrical engineering at Stanford University. In 2005, he joined the Stanford Radiology Department faculty. Dr. Hargreaves' research focuses on body magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) applications (including abdominal, vascular, breast, and musculoskeletal imaging) and the development of novel excitation schemes, efficient imaging methods, and reconstruction tools that provide improved diagnostic contrast compared with current methods. Aside from work, he plays ice hockey and soccer, and he is on the volunteer ski patrol at Sugar Bowl ski resort. To view Dr. Hargreaves' pior blog postings, please access http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2009/02/drs_gold_and_ha_2.html; http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2009/01/drs_gold_and_ha.html; and http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2008/04/awards_and_hono_31.html.

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    Seungbum Koo, PhD, assistant professor of mechanical engineering at Chung-Ang University in South Korea, received his doctoral degree in mechanical engineering at Stanford University in 2006 and worked as a research associate in radiology until February 2009. His research interests include medical image processing and joint biomechanics, with a focus on knee joint biomechanics and articular cartilage degeneration to understand the mechanical pathways of osteoarthritis in the knee. Dr. Koo recently took a faculty position in South Korea.


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    Ronald Watkins, senior research engineer, has been working in medical imaging since joining GE Medical Systems in 1980, where he was part of an engineering team that developed the first commercial version of digital subtraction X-ray angiography. During his career, he has been involved in the development of data acquisition systems for CT as well as several subsystems for the first commercial, high-field 1.5 Tesla magnetic resonance system, including pulse sequence generators, gradient amplifiers, RF amplifiers, and digital image processors. Mr. Watkins began working in the development of transducers and analog front ends for cardiac ultrasound in 1985. Four years later, he developed catheters and electronics for high-resolution, high-frequency intravascular ultrasound at Cardiovascular Imaging Systems in Sunnyvale, a high tech medical device startup company founded by Cardiologist Paul Yock, MD.

    In 1991, Mr. Watkins returned to GE's Corporate Research and Development Division in Schenectady, New York, where he worked with co-inventors Harvey Cline, PhD, and Kullervo Hynynen, PhD, at the University of Arizona to develop the first MR-guided focused ultrasound surgery system. In 2000, this technology was transferred to form the basis for the Haifa Israel start-up InsighTec. Mr. Watkins also led the development of the first commercial whole body 3.0 Tesla MRI system, which initiated a rapid increase in the deployment of 3.0 Tesla systems from a few fMRI research sites to the thousands of mainstream clinical radiology sites present today. Furthermore, he developed much of the hardware for massively parallel receive arrays, parallel transmit, and RF subsystems for 7.0 Tesla MRI systems.

    In 2007, Mr. Watkins joined the Stanford Department of Radiology, where he has been developing coils and hardware for high-field MRI and has continued the development of MR-guided focused ultrasound, including the use of capacitive micro-machined ultrasound transducers, pioneered by the Khuri-Yakub group in the Stanford E. L. Ginzton Lab. In recognition of his research on the development of MR-guided focused ultrasound, Mr. Watkins was awarded a Magna Cum Laude citation by the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) in 1994. In addition, he has 38 issued U.S. patents and more than 40 conference proceedings and journal publications.

    Did You Know?

    A Sketch of Early Radiologists*
    The head of the Department of Roentgenology at Children's Hospital in Boston, Dr. Percy Brown, conducted a survey of all members of the American Roentgen Ray Society (ARRS) in 1910.

    Of the 50% who responded, the majority received their medical degrees during the years 1896 to 1903. Many of those who received their medical degrees between 1900 to 1903 had worked with X-rays as photographers, engineers, physicists, and eletricians prior to medical school.

    20% of the ARRS members surveyed limited their practice to radiology while the remaining 80% "were equally divided between general practice and some other specialty."

    30% of survey participants indicated that they practiced both X-ray diagnosis and therapy while "[a]bout half worked only in diagnosis, and a significant minority (19%) specialized solely in therapy."

    (The above statistics are from Radiology: An Illustrated History by Eisenberg, Ronald L.; St. Louis, MO: Mosby-Year Book, 1992: 61).

    Awards and Honors: March 23, 2009

    Marcus Alley, PhD, senior research scientist; Garry E. Gold, MD, associate professor of radiology and (by courtesy) bioengineering and orthopedics at Stanford University; Robert J. Herfkens, MD, professor of radiology, director of MRI, and associate chair for clinical technology; Michael Lustig, PhD, engineering research associate; John Pauly, PhD, professor of electrical engineering; and Dr. Shreyas Vasanawala, assistant professor of radiology, were awarded the 2009 Lauterbur Award by the Society of Computed Body Tomography and Magnetic Resonance (SCBT/MR) for their outstanding research project "Faster Pediatric MRI with Compressed Sensing." The Lauterbur Award in MR was named in honor of Paul Lauterbur, PhD, who was awarded the Nobel Prize in 2003 for his work in MRI. Please find photos and brief biographies of some of our award winners by clicking on the link below.

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    Marcus Alley, PhD, senior research scientist, received his BA in physics from Reed College in Portland, Oregon, and his MS (physics) and PhD (nuclear physics) from the University of Wisconsin, Madison, where he completed his thesis entitled "An Effective Range Determination of Phase Shifts for the Elastic Proton Helium-3 Reaction between the Energies of 0 and 12 MeV." Dr. Alley has been a member of the Stanford Department of Radiology since 1994, when he began as a postdoctoral fellow mentored by Norbert Pelc, ScD. After completing his postdoctoral fellowship, Dr. Alley worked as an MR applications and software developer, and, in May of 2005, he became a senior research scientist in our Department. His current research involves developing MRI with compressed sensing for body and pediatric imaging. His past awards include a third place Scientific Paper Award for his paper entitled "Measurement of T1 of Flowing Blood, Extraction Fraction of Gd-DTPA and Single-Kidney GFR Using Interleaved Spiral Acquisition" from the Society of Uroradiology, Twenty-Fifth Scientific Assembly, in 2000. Dr. Alley also has over 35 publications and 7 patents.

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    Garry E. Gold, MD, associate professor of radiology and (by courtesy) bioengineering and orthopedics at Stanford University, received a master's degree in electrical engineering from Stanford in 1988 and his MD from Stanford in 1992. Dr. Gold has authored over 60 journal articles, 170 abstracts, and 5 patents in MRI. He has been the principal investigator or a co-investigator on over 30 funded research projects, and he is the principal investigator on two NIH-funded projects to improve MR imaging of osteoarthritis and the use of real-time MRI for the study of biomechanics. The International Skeletal Society recently awarded Dr. Gold the President's Medal, and this is the sixth time he was been awarded the Lauterbur Award for the best MRI paper from the Society for Computed Body Tomography and Magnetic Resonance (SCBT/MR). Dr. Gold reviews manuscripts for ten peer-reviewed journals, including the Journal of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (JMRI) and the Journal of Magnetic Resonance in Medicine (MRM), and he is on the editorial board of several publications. At Stanford, Dr. Gold practices clinical musculoskeletal radiology, teaching medical students, residents, and fellows. He teaches two courses in imaging physics and human anatomy for medical students and graduate students, and he was recently awarded the Kaiser Award for outstanding and innovative contributions to education. He also serves as an advisor and co-advisor for many engineering graduate students and postdoctoral fellows. To view his prior blog postings, please access http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2009/02/drs_gold_and_ha_2.html; http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2009/01/drs_gold_and_ha.html; http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2008/06/people_and_thei_6.html; http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2008/04/awards_and_hono_37.html; http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2008/04/awards_and_hono_31.html; http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2007/10/awards_and_hono_19.html; http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2007/04/awards_and_hono_1.html; http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2007/02/awards_and_hono_18.html; and http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2007/02/new_faculty_hir_1.html.


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    Michael Lustig, PhD, engineering research associate, received his BSc in 2001 from the Department of Electrical Engineering, in Technion-IIT, Haifa, Israel. He completed his PhD in 2008 from the Department of Electrical Engineering at Stanford University, where his doctoral research focused on the application of compressed sensing to rapid MRI. Currently, he is a research associate in the Magnetic Resonance Systems Research Lab (MRSRL) in the Stanford Department of Engineering, where his research interests include medical imaging reconstruction, MR pulse sequence design, convex optimization, and inverse problems.


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    Dr. Shreyas Vasanawala, assistant professor of radiology, joined the Department of Radiology faculty in July of 2007, after receiving his degree and a PhD in biophysics from Stanford University, followed by residency training in radiology at Stanford University Medical Center and a pediatric radiology fellowship at Lucile Packard Children's Hospital (LPCH). During his fellowship, Dr. Vasanawala received specialty training in pediatric musculoskeletal imaging at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center and in pediatric cardiovascular imaging at Sick Kids in Toronto. At Stanford, Dr. Vasanawala's research focus includes testing the feasibility of magnetic resonance imaging techniques for evaluating pediatric and abdominal disease. In recognition of his research, he recently received an International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine (ISMRM) Seed Grant for his proposed research project, "Non-Contrast-Enhanced Renal MRA Using Multiple Inversion Recovery." Developed in collaboration with doctoral student Hattie Dong and Professor Dwight Nishimura, Dr. Vasanawala's proposal was cited for its innovation and potential impact. The competition was open to young investigators, and only one grant was awarded in each of the areas of low back pain and renal MRI. For his prior blog postings, please access http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2009/02/awards_and_hono_76.html; http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2008/07/awards_and_hono_43.html; and http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2007/07/new_faculty_hir.html.


    "The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly" in Imaging: Radio Interview by Dr. Pat Basu

    Pat Basu, MBA, MD, chief radiology resident, was recently interviewed on RSNA On-the-Air regarding the appropriate use of imaging examinations. Dr. Basu's interview was sent to several nationally syndicated radio stations and was derived from his presentation at the 2008 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) Conference entitled, "Creating A Patient Centered Radiology Facility: An Imaging Center Where Radiologists Interact Directly with Their Patients." To listen to his radio interview, please click on the link below.

    Did You Know?

    Public Perception of Radiologists in 1956 and 2008
    A 1956 survey by Eastman Kodak revealed that "[l]ess than one in four patients who had received a radiographic or fluoroscopic examination knew that there was a specialized physician--called a radiologist--who was involved in its performance or interpretation" (from "Who Are You? and Who Cares?" (Download file) by Linton, O; Academic Radiology September 2008;15(9):1212).

    A 2008 national survey by the American College of Radiology (ACR) entitled "The Face of Radiology" revealed that Americans are still "split down the middle" regarding "whether a radiologist is a person who interprets or a person who administers the scan." During four focus groups in Miami, Florida, and Burlington, Vermont, adults age 35 and older had "general attitudes towards radiologists and radiology" that were "positive" and that reflected "the notion that the radiologist is a trained professional," though respondents were "split as to whether a radiologist is a licensed physician or a technician" (Download file).

    People and Their Pets: Daisy

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    Daisy on Halloween 2008 (l) and adoption day (r)

    Two years ago, Sheila Galuppo, marketing manager for outpatient imaging at Stanford Hospital and Clinics, rescued a four-month old Basset Hound named Daisy: "She was surrendered by a young couple who could not spend enough time with her. She escaped once before from their home and the Humane Society picked her up. I originally fostered her first since she was only four-months old and not adoptable yet. When I picked her up at the Humane Society, I suspected that she had caught Kennel Cough, but they insisted she was fine. The next day she was so sick; her breathing was distressed, and she was about five pounds under weight. After medical care, food, and lots of love, she returned to great condition. I adopted her a month later. She is now about two- and a half-years old. She and I have been in obedience training classes for over a year with the goal of obtaining her therapy dog license. We would like to volunteer at care centers and children's hospitals. There is nothing like bringing a smile to a child with the unconditional love of a furry friend."

    Did You Know?

    On March 1, 2009, Drs. Glazer and Beaulieu were quoted in an article from the New York Times entitled "Good or Useless, Medical Scans Cost the Same," regarding the varying quality of imaging scans. To view the article, please click here or Download file. The article also appears in the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.

    New Staff Hires and Promotions: March 3, 2009

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    Sheila Galuppo was recently hired as our marketing manager for outpatient imaging at Stanford Hospital and Clinics. For over 15 years, she has worked in medical sales, building close working relationships with community physicians and their staff. Before joining our Department, she worked as the marketing manager for an independent start-up imaging center in the San Jose area for four years. Drawing on her knowledge and experience concerning excelling in a very competitive imaging industry, Ms. Galuppo's goal for Stanford Radiology is to obtain radiology referrals from our community physicians.

    Born and raised in the San Jose area, Ms. Galuppo is from a second-generation Italian immigrant family: "I went to UC Santa Cruz as a marine biology major with dreams of becoming a veterinarian specializing in marine mammals. My mentors as a child were Jacques Cousteau, Marty Stauffer, Marlin Perkins, and, of course, mom and dad. Funny, how life takes us on a journey. While working as a veterinarian technician after college, I met many sales representatives coming to the physician's office, and I discovered a new passion, medical sales, and I have never looked back. I am also an avid scuba diver, although I prefer warm water diving in my older years. My other hobbies include camping, hiking, and dog training. Two years ago, I rescued a four-month old Basset Hound named Daisy. She and I have been in obedience training classes for over a year with the goal of obtaining her therapy dog license. We would like to volunteer at care centers and children's hospitals. There is nothing like bringing a smile to a child with the unconditional love of a furry friend."

    (Image of Ms. Galuppo courtesy of Mark Riesenberger)


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    Daisy on Halloween 2008


    New Staff Hires and Promotions: March 2, 2009

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    Douglas Cathon, MA, ARRT, has joined our Department as our Radiology quality manager at Stanford Hospital and Clinics. Prior to coming to Stanford, Mr. Cathon worked at the University of Chicago Medical Center. He has over 30 years of management experience working in quality management; leading community programs; and teaching business and health courses, on topics including principles of management, organizational behavior, organizational theory, and human resources. Mr. Cathon has published a book entitled Management Dominos and has over 40 publications in professional journals on subjects such as stress management, performance, buying a computer system, and marketing. Other key areas of his experience include quality assessment and improvement; imaging operations management; departmental policy and procedural manuals; Certificates of Need and RFP's; cost analysis; coding/billing; supply control; and short- and long-range planning.

    In addition, Mr. Cathon has clinical experience from his work as a radiological technologist in all areas of radiology and from his service in the Navy as a hospital corpsman with experience as an operating room technician; lab technician; X-ray technician; and pharmacy technician. In the Navy, he was also the leading petty officer on a number of duty stations, which included 10 ships, 2 clinics, and 4 hospitals, and he has 5 years of experience as a Total Quality Management instructor. In 1982, Mr. Cathon received a Navy Achievement Award for designing a medical department on board a ship. His educational background includes an MA in human resource development from Webster University, St. Louis, MO; an MA in health services management from Webster University, St. Louis, MO; a Bachelor of Science in Occupational Education (medical technology and business) from Wayland Baptist University, Plainview Texas; and EPIC-Radiant certification in the radiology RIS system. He is also an American Health Care Radiology Administrators Fellow.

    When he is not at work, Mr. Cathon enjoys spending time with his two children and four grandchildren as well as driving his 94 Corvette.

    (Image courtesy of Mark Riesenberger)

    Drs. Gold and Hargreaves' Osteoarthritis Research Featured on ABC7 News

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    At 6 PM on Thursday, February 26th, ABC News on channel 7 featured research by Drs. Gold, associate professor of radiology (left), and Hargreaves, assistant professor of radiology (right), regarding the detection of osteoarthritis using the latest imaging techniques in sodium MRI in their broadcast, "MRI Detects Knee Injuries Sooner." To view a video of the broadcast or to read the transcript, please click here or Download file


    To read more about their project, please access their prior blog posting, "Drs. Gold and Hargreaves Detect Osteoarthritis Using Sodium MRI." Please also see an earlier news release from the Stanford School of Medicine highlighting their research, "Stanford Develops Imaging Technique to Catch Arthritis Early in Onset" or Download file.

    Awards and Honors: February 19, 2009

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    Adam Wang, MS, doctoral student in Electrical Engineering and member of the Radiological Sciences Laboratory (RSL), was 1 of only 8 finalists (out of 34 entrants) for the Michael B. Merickel Student Paper Award at the 2009 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE) Medical Imaging Conference for his work entitled "Optimal Energy Thresholds and Weights for Separating Materials Using Photon Counting X-Ray Detectors with Energy Discriminating Capabilities."

    Mentored by Dr. Norbert Pelc, Mr. Wang is currently a research assistant in the RSL where he is investigating task-based optimal multi-energy discrimination techniques for CT systems and developing lossy compression methods to reduce CT data rate without diagnostic impact.

    Prior to entering the doctoral program, Mr. Wang received his master's in electrical engineering from Stanford, after completing his BS in electrical engineering at the University of Texas at Austin. In addition to being a finalist for the Michael B. Merickel Student Paper Award, Mr. Wang's other awards include an Electrical Engineering Departmental Fellowship from Stanford University and the Distinguished College of Engineering Scholar Award at the University of Texas at Austin. When he's not working, he enjoys running, cycling, and working on his bikes.

    Dr. Atlas' Commentary on Our Healthcare System Featured in The Washington Times

    Atlas_100.gif In his commentary, "ATLAS: Pardon the Interruption," Dr. Scott Atlas, professor and chief of neuroradiology and senior fellow at both the Hoover Institution and Freeman-Spogli Institute for International Studies, critiques the call for a larger role for government in our healthcare system. Citing several published studies, Dr. Atlas highlights a "few unheralded facts about America's health-care system." To read his commentary, please access http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2009/feb/18/pardon-the-interruption/ or download the article here: Download file.

    New Stanford Medicine Imaging Center Opens in Redwood City

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    In February of 2009, we opened an innovative imaging center in Redwood City at the Stanford Medicine Outpatient Center (SMOC) (see photo on left), which will allow us to accelerate the delivery of patient-centric imaging services. Our new facility, Stanford Medicine Imaging, Redwood City, includes two 3T MRIs and one CT and focuses on musculoskeletal and abdominal studies. Future plans include increasing the number of modalities to three CT and three MR scanners. For more information, including directions, maps, parking, and scheduling an appointment, please click here: Stanford Medicine Imaging, Redwood City. To read the latest articles on our new outpatient imaging center, please access the following:

    "For Many Outpatient Services, the Doctor Will Now See You in Redwood City"

    "Stanford Medicine Outpatient Center Set to Open on February 17" (Download file here)

    "Outpatient Center Was Built with Patient-Centric Care at Its Heart" (Download file here)

    "A Closer Look: The Clinics at the Outpatient Center" (Download file here)

    "Did You Know" (Download file here)


    Awards and Honors III: February 13, 2009

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    Brian Rutt, PhD, professor of radiology and director of the High-Field MRI Program, has been elected to Fellow of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering (AIMBE). Election to Fellow of the AIMBE is awarded to outstanding bioengineers in academia, industry, and government who have distinguished themselves through their contributions in research, industrial practice, and/or education. On February 12th, Dr. Rutt traveled to Washington, DC, to receive his award as part of the induction ceremony of new fellows of the AIMBE. Before coming to Stanford, Dr. Rutt was a scientist at the Robarts Research Institute and professor of diagnostic radiology and nuclear medicine at the University of Western Ontario, where he has held the Barnett-Ivey Endowed Research Chair, Heart and Stroke Foundation since 1997. At Robarts, he co-founded the Cellular and Molecular Imaging Program; served as the scientific director for the 1.5T and 3T research MRI facilities; and established a hardware engineering core facility. Under his direction, the first 1.5T MRI scanner and one of the first 3T MRI systems in Canada were installed in London, Ontario.

    After completing his BASc in engineering science at the University of Toronto, Ontario, Dr. Rutt received his master's degree in electrical engineering from Stanford, returning to Canada to attain his PhD in medical biophysics at the University of Western Ontario. Subsequently, he completed a postdoc at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF). His research interests include MRI technology development and the application of advanced MRI techniques for studying the cardiovascular system, brain, and cancer. When he is not working, Dr. Rutt enjoys bicycling and wood working. For Dr. Rutt's prior blog posting, please access http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2009/02/meet_brian_rutt.html.

    Did You Know?

    RADIOLOGICAL FEES IN 1910*

    Sinus Examination: $25 to $50
    Location of Foreign Bodies in the Eye: $25 to $50
    Examination of Teeth: $10 to $75
    Diagnosis of Renal and Vesical Calculi and Gallstones: $50 to $200
    Chest Examination: $25 to $100
    Shoulder Examination: $25 to $50
    Elbow Examination: $15 to $50
    Hand and Wrist Examination: $15 to $50
    Foot and Ankle Examination: $15 to $50
    Leg and Knee Examination: $25 to $75
    Stomach and Bowel Examination: $75 to $200
    Hip and Pelvis Examination: $50 to $100

    (*The above statistics are for examinations and work done "inside the laboratory of the operator"; for work done outside the laboratory, "add 50 to 500 percent more." All statistics are from the ARRS Committee on Fee-Table [sic] published in "Minutes of the ARRS Meeting" from the Americal Quarterly of Roentgenology (1910;3:80) and quoted in "Radiology--Then and Now," by NJ Nazinitsky and BM Gold from the American Journal of Radiology (1988;151:251)).

    Awards and Honors II: February 13, 2009

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    Dr. Shreyas Vasanawala, assistant professor of radiology, has won an International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine (ISMRM) Seed Grant for his proposed research project, "Non-Contrast-Enhanced Renal MRA Using Multiple Inversion Recovery." Developed in collaboration with doctoral student Hattie Dong and Professor Dwight Nishimura, Dr. Vasanawala's proposal was cited for its innovation and potential impact. The competition was open to young investigators, and only one grant was awarded in each of the areas of low back pain and renal MRI.

    Dr. Vasanawala's research focus includes testing the feasibility of magnetic resonance imaging techniques for evaluating pediatric and abdominal disease. Dr. Vasanawala joined the Department of Radiology faculty in July of 2007, after receiving his degree and a PhD in biophysics from Stanford University, followed by residency training in radiology at Stanford University Medical Center and a pediatric radiology fellowship at Lucile Packard Children's Hospital (LPCH). During his fellowship, Dr. Vasanawala received specialty training in pediatric musculoskeletal imaging at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center and in pediatric cardiovascular imaging at Sick Kids in Toronto. For his prior blog postings, please access http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2008/07/awards_and_hono_43.html and http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2007/07/new_faculty_hir.html.

    Awards and Honors I: February 13, 2009

    de la zerda.jpgAdam de la Zerda, PhD candidate in the Multimodality Molecular Imaging Laboratory (MMIL), has been awarded the Best Poster Presentation Award for his poster on enhanced sensitivity photoacoustic imaging agents at the Photoacoustic Session of the Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE) Photonics West 2009 Conference.

    Mentored by Dr. Gambhir, Mr. de la Zerda researches photoacoustic molecular imaging and its broad applications for cancer. He is the PI of two predoctoral grants: one supported by the Department of Defense (DOD) Breast Cancer Research Program and the other by Bio-X. He has received numerous awards for his work including the Young Investigator Award at the World Molecular Imaging Congress 2008; the Bio-X Student Travel Award; and first place at the Bay Area Entrepreneurship Contest. He holds a number of publications and patents, and he is also a professional reviewer for Nature Nanotechnology and Medical Physics. Prior to coming to Stanford, Mr. de la Zerda received his BScs Summa Cum Laude in computer science, electrical engineering, and physics from the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology in Haifa, Israel.

    For Mr. de la Zerda's prior blog award announcements, please access http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2008/11/awards_and_hono_60.html; http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2008/07/awards_and_hono_45.html;
    and http://radiology.stanford.edu/blog/archives/2007/06/awards_and_hono_6.html.

    Meet Brian Rutt, PhD, Professor of Radiology and Director of Our High-Field MRI Program at Stanford Radiology

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    By Julie Ruiz, PhD

    With over 20 years of experience in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), Dr. Brian Rutt is an expert in MRI technology development and the application of advanced MRI techniques for studying the cardiovascular system, brain, and cancer. As director of our High-Field MRI Program in the Radiological Sciences Laboratory (RSL), he is looking forward to furthering our efforts in building a 7T research program. "We need to update and integrate the 7T with the other scanners at the Lucas Center and on campus so that users can easily use it to produce reliable and excellent images," he commented. "Although higher field strength makes everything more challenging, the promise of higher image quality means that we should be able to detect disease earlier. We don't really know what all the clinical applications of 7T MRI will be, but . . .

    I would expect that most will be in the brain and extremities (for example, knee cartilage). There is a lot of interest, and I hope to act as a catalyst for bringing new users to the 7T, which should be easy given the research strengths and interests of our faculty, staff, and students. I would also like to establish synergies between the Lucas 7T and the 7T animal scanner located at the Clark Center, which should help to build bridges between RSL and MIPS."

    Dr. Rutt has an excellent track record of building interdisciplinary programs. Before coming to Stanford, he was a scientist at the Robarts Research Institute and professor of diagnostic radiology and nuclear medicine at the University of Western Ontario. At Robarts, he co-founded the Cellular and Molecular Imaging Program with Paula Foster, PhD; served as the scientific director for the 1.5T and 3T research facilities; and established a hardware engineering core facility. Under his direction, the first 1.5T MRI scanner and one of the first 3T MRI systems in Canada were installed in London, Ontario.

    However, it was in Stanford, California, not London, Ontario, where Dr. Rutt was first introduced to medical imaging. "I was a very young and green engineering student when I came to Stanford for my master's degree in electrical engineering in the late 70s. After graduating from the University of Toronto with a degree in engineering science, I applied to Stanford but was wait listed. I already had a job lined up when Stanford accepted me for admission to their master's program in electrical engineering late in the summer of 1976. I turned down the job; accepted the Stanford offer; packed a couple of bags, a bike, and a guitar onto a plane; flew out to San Francisco; and proceeded to have the most wonderful year of school of my life. I knew nothing about medical imaging when I got to Stanford, but that year I took a course on the principles of medical imaging from Albert Macovski, Stanford professor of electrical engineering and a pioneer of many imaging methods. He was assigned to me as my MSc advisor and during my second term, I did an independent research project with him, which exposed me to the exciting world of research in medical imaging. I loved attending Stanford that year. I rented a room in a house in Ladera on the way to Portola Valley and rode my bike to school every day, watching the sun rise over the big dish each morning during a famous drought year. At night, I would bike back up Alpine Road in the dark, and that last mile home was straight up hill, so I was in the best physical shape of my life!"

    After earning his master's degree, Dr. Rutt went back to Canada to complete his PhD in medical biophysics with a focus on dual energy methods in X-ray, then returned to California for a postdoc. As a postdoc at the University of California, San Francisco, (UCSF), he was surrounded by the pioneers of the IMATRON ultra-fast CT technology in the early 80s (i.,e., Doug Boyd, PhD, and others, including Sandy Napel, PhD). Just down the road from his lab in south San Francisco, scientists were making MRI breakthroughs, notably Lean Kaufmann, PhD, and Larry Crooks, PhD, and word of these developments was spreading throughout the University and the world. Although his graduate and postdoc research had been in CT, Dr. Rutt decided to s