Radiology
Research Resources

Research Cores & Centers

The diverse multi-disciplinary teams in our three research sections are supported in their efforts by an array of research resources spanning a range of capabilities that include: computational modeling, image management/processing, MR imaging, Molecular imaging, Proteomics, Chemistry, Cell/Molecular Biology, and Animal Model Management.

3D and Quantitative (3DQ) Imaging Lab

Through interdisciplinary collaboration, Stanford Radiology's 3DQ Imaging Lab develops and applies innovative techniques for the efficient quantitative analysis and display of medical imaging data used in training, research, and the delivery of patient care.

Biostatistics

Stanford's Health Research and Policy, Division of Biostatistics, is involved in the research activities of every clinical division in the School of Medicine, many basic science departments, as well as national efforts. The Biostatistics Division expects to be an integral part of the growth of biomedical science in the near and long term.

Cell / Molecular Biology

Part of the Canary Center at Stanford for Cancer Early Detection, the Cell/Molecular Biology Core facilitates the development of tools for early diagnosis of cancers. Well equipped, the Core develops and characterizes antibody and ligand-based probes for targeted molecular imaging, thus supporting the development of highly sensitive multifunctional optical, PET and MRI probes for imaging cancers by targeting cancer-specific cellular targets.

Chemistry

One of the basic Research Cores at the Canary Center at Stanford for Cancer Early Detection, the Chemistry Core offers instrumentation capability for synthesis, analysis, and characterization of both small and large biologically significant molecules. The Core's chemists design and develop novel molecular agents for both in vivo and in vitro early detection of cancer. Molecular imaging agents in development include optical, photoacoustic, and multimodality probes, as well as agents for non-imaging strategies such as blood biomarker sensors.

Computational Modeling

Stanford Radiology's Information Sciences in Imaging at Stanford (ISIS) offers critical computational modeling capabilities. This Core is developing the capability to collect annotated imaging, clinical and molecular data, and integrate them by creating databases that encode the relationships among them. These pioneering methods are improving the diagnostic and treatment planning value of images and leading the way to personalized, less-invasive approaches to early detection and treatment, while also improving our understanding of human biology and disease.

Image Quantitation, Analysis and Visualization Specialized Resource

Originally formed to support research and developmental projects within the ICMIC@Stanford program, the Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford (MIPS), and other collaborative research groups, the Image Quantitation, Analysis and Visualization specialized resource provides training and support on various molecular imaging data analysis and visualization software tools and methods. The resource provides project-based expert advice for basic science and clinician investigators to maximize the quantitative nature of their image data analysis.

Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

The Richard M. Lucas Center for Imaging, home to the NIH-funded Center for Advanced Magnetic Resonance Technology (CAMRT), houses facilities for MR imaging at multiple fields and for magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Stanford Radiology's MR group also maintains and operates a 7T small bore system in the small animal imaging lab (SCI3). Members of the Radiological Sciences Lab (RSL) have pioneered MRI/MRS technology while developing new techniques that benefit patients with stroke, cancer, heart disease, and brain disorders. MRI research conducted at the Lucas Center includes collaborative and original research using human subjects and also intact animal models.

Proteomics

The Proteomics Core Facility in the Canary Center at Stanford for Cancer Early Detection is a state-of-the-art mass spectrometry resource dedicated to the discovery and verification of blood-based protein biomarkers. This Core is developing and implementing a high throughput biomarker verification platform that exploits magnetic nanoparticle-facilitated immunoaffinity capture as a prelude to mass spectrometric biomarker quantification.

Radiochemistry and Cyclotron

The Radiochemistry Facility and Cyclotron are located on the first floor of the Lucas Expansion building. The cyclotron produces radioisotopes for both clinical and research use and is surrounded by an FDG production lab and research hot labs. Used for production of research radiopharmaceuticals that support clinical and PET studies at the Stanford University Medical Center and the SCI3, these hot labs also house radiochemistry research for the development of new radiopharmaceuticals.

Stanford Center for Innovation in In-Vivo Imaging (SCI3) Lab - Small Animal Imaging

Housed in the Clark Building, the Stanford Center for Innovation in In-Vivo Imaging (SCI3) applies and advances technologies for in-vivo biological assessment and imaging in animal models. The lab's instrumentation supports the development of reagents and approaches that reveal in-vivo changes at the molecular and cellular levels to gain a greater understanding from animal models. The SCI3 lab provides a test bed for evaluating human imaging reagents and strategies building upon the enrichment of data sets, as well as the flexibility and rapid analyses garnered from animal models.

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